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  • Phrase the questions in abstract, without focusing on the specific guest. Make it relevant for anyone not familiar with this podcast.

    For example, instead of asking "How did Jake learn to ride a bike," change that question to "How can I learn to ride a bike?" and give an answer from this episode, as if it was a statement, "To learn to ride a bike, you have to ... A-B-C...etc.".
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1.

What was Paul Berberian's first contact with entrepreneurship? 01:06

Paul Berberian grew up in Los Angeles, California. His father was an immigrant to the United States, originally from Beirut, Lebanon. He spoke English as his six language and he was the typical American rags-to-riches story; hard-working, running a bunch of little businesses. Paul grew up working for all of his dad's little companies.

They made liniments for professional race horses, sold used pinball machines, had a diner, made hand lotion for emergency medical kits and even made the stuff that numbs your gum before a dentist gives you the novocaine.

They were not great at running those businesses, but they would buy them along with the whole building, and use the business's cash flow to pay for the mortgage, eventually owning a bunch of buildings in Southern California.

2.

What was Paul Berberian's first exit? 03:12

A company called link VTC, a video conferencing software, which he grew from nothing and sold within two years.

3.

What is Sphero? 04:36

Sphero makes robotic products focused on getting kids interested in coding through stem based education. They sell to schools around the world and are currently the number one robot used in schools K through 8. Students use Sphero robots to bring their lessons to life.