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Top Podcast Insights in 60 Seconds


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Status is your ranking in the social hierarchy, and unlike money, status is a zero-sum game. If you have an asset, like a house, you are not taking away from another person's ability to acquire a house. On the other hand, if someone's "status ranking" is #3, in order for them to move up, the #2 person has to move out of the way. Sports and politics are some examples of zero-sum games, where in order to have a winner, you have to have a loser.

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Price for the amount of time that you are saving the host. Courtland was immediately sold on Bradley's podcast editing services because it was saving him hours every day.

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A co-founder is a partner. Technical people are in high demand, and if they are willing to join a startup, they are definitely not looking for a job. What they want is to be equal partners, to have a steak in the business, to own something, to have a say.

Realistically, a startup is a long and grueling journey that cofounders take together.

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1) Worrying about something so far out that it might not happen.

The way to stop worrying about future problems is to get more information to understand the problem, and to figure out the next step.

2) Being nervous about the things outside of your control.

As stated, they are outside of your control so there is nothing you can do; the only sensible solution is to stop worrying about them.

3) Worrying about something that you know you need to do, but you also do not want to do, like laying people off, for example.

This is perhaps the most challenging worry as it involves emotions, and emotions are not easily quantified.

To stop worrying about this type of problem, put the emotions aside and think through the logic of the business case first, quantify the business issues. Once you understand why you have to resolve the issue at hand, you will find a way to deal with the emotions of doing it.

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Nothing that you chase will ever make you happy.

You may think that by getting to a certain outcome or a milestone will make you happy, but when you get there, you will get a short-term boost, and then go back to being unhappy.

To be happy, you have to be happy with self.

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You hire someone who does! Ramon went to oDesk and hired a freelancer who knew exactly how to write his type of content. She still works at ths company to this day.

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A big as YouTube. In 10 years, every day you'll open Smash Notes and you'll check what is new from your favorite podcasters, and your followers. Then, instead of listening to 20 hours of podcasts, you will get the gist in just a few minutes.

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Tikhon was in graduate school in theoretical physics, when he read Paul Graham's essay on How to Start a Startup. Inspired by what he saw, Tikhon applied, not at all sure that he would get in, but once accepted, Tikhon dropped out of grad school and moved to Cambridge, where YC was based at the time. The rest is history!

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Startup products initially appeal to innovators, people who like to be the first to try the newest thing. They seldom spend a lot of money, but they're super important because they curate new ideas for everyone else who follows.

Then come the visionaries. These people are the trailblazers who are living in the future, and they see an opportunity for a new product to solve a burning problem that's blocking that better future. They're willing to take a leap of faith on a proof of concept.

Then come the pragmatists. No matter how well the product serves their needs, they need social proof to buy it. They're more motivated by not getting fired than by living in the future. They start using a product when they feel left out because all their other friends are starting to use it.

Jeffrey Moore shows that a startup needs to dominate a niche of passionate, visionary early adopters, but then expand from that position of strength, to early niches of pragmatist.

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Solve your decision problem first.

Most likely, you don't have too much email, but rather you have a problem deciding what and how to do with your email.

Here is how you could deal with this:

1) Automate most commonly requested emails, and even consider putting a disclaimer on what you will and will not talk about via email.

Put processes in place for your email workflows.

If you get emails that always require a certain type of response, or a follow up, make sure that those processes kick off on their own, without requiring you to participate in the email flow.

Filter anything you don't want to read, and auto-trash useless emails, like out-of-office replies.

2) Use tools like text-expander to fill in auto-responses to common issues. This way you can still sound human, and appear like you are responding with a personal message, while in reality doing almost no work to respond.

3) Set a time for when you processes email, and do not touch your emails in any other time. Also, Do not put aside email that you actually want to respond to. You will never get back to them, so either respond right away, or forget.

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Leverage someone else's followers! Get on social media and start making intelligent comments on other people's posts. If your comments are worthy, they will bubble up and you will get value. Don't fake it, add your personal perspective instead.

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Instead of measuring Covid-related deaths as a proportion of the infected population, we are measuring it as an average percentage of people who got diagnosed, the demographic that is skewed towards much older age.

The death rate for folks under 40 is incredibly small, vs. those over 70 where the rate is high.

If we want to get over this pandemic, it would be ideal if we could figure out how to let the population in danger to remain isolated, while everyone could go on with life as usual.

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99% of the time, people think that the expectation is obvious, that it was already discussed, while in reality it's probably not true. Deliberately setting expectations of what you expect from people, and what they expect from you is important for a successful outcome.

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Don't make it more complicated than it has to be. Figure out a need, and find a way to solve it. Your business might not be sexy, and it's going to be hard work, but it will make money. The hard part is all emotion. Hard part is making cold calls, being rejected, putting yourself on the line.

Start simple, get your first customers, and then look for more opportunities from there on.

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Doctors are not generally concerned with how high the fever is (until a certain point), but rather they look for symptoms of what else is going on with the body. Fever can make you feel a little bad, but by itself it is not going to hurt you. Whatever is causing your body to spike a really high fever is what the doctors want to identify and treat.

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Jonathan's parents were Chinese and Korean, and at the time, his parents were not allowed to get married; it was seen as a very shameful thing. Jonathan ended up living with his mom, and had only met his dad recently, at the young age of 49.

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You have the role of being the spouse and you cannot neglect it because it will impact the kids. Making sure to have date nights and quantity time, not just quality. Diess emphasizes to not miss out on events.

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Back in the day people went to Silicon Valley because they wanted to build companies; the offices were run down, and the glamour was none. People were poor, at least to start, but they were all excited about what they were doing. Now every office looks like it came from the Silicon Valley show, but people inside are deeply unhappy.

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Many founders identify clicks on their lives when they realize they will become founders. That happened to Buster while working at Amazon and feeling disillusioned of doing the same things over and over again.