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Top Podcast Insights in 60 Seconds


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Instead of making decisions based on circumstances, choose a principle that will be your guiding star, and make decisions based on it.

In Airbnb's case, Brian knew that by overwriting hosts' cancelation policy to return money to his guests was going to be a big challenge, but choose "health and safety" as the guiding principle had enabled him to justify it as the right path forward.

To smooth out the impact, Airbnb then ended up using their cash on hand to partially reimburse the hosts who lost out on income.

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A 3x5 card can be used to simply place a daily to-do list on based on the weekly accountability check-in. Write 3-5 tasks on the card and then star the most important item that needs to be completed.

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Single people may not realize it now, but they have four times the amount of time compared to someone who has three kids. You don’t realize how much free time you have until your time is controlled by kids.

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It is hard to have someone living in the house with you all the time, and even if you spend a long time selecting the right person, you might find out they are really not a great match in the long run.

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Hiten suggests that over time startup founders learn to put away their own personality and instead take on a business one, which they use to communicate with the outside world. As a result, their own personality is put aside, and with it, their feelings.

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If you compared high-school to someone's day job, you'd realize that the workload is pretty easy, it's not really demanding on your time, and you might even be able to do other things while doing your school work.

"If you have to be in prison, at least learn to be a good chess player." - PG.

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Yes. You do not have to respond to their every desire. It builds resilience. Think about it - do people jump and respond to your every need as adult? No. Maybe it is good to condition your kids to not expect that either.

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Reverse engineer them.

Look at your competitors: what are they doing well, what are they failing at? Pick ideas from that. Then look at sites that are doing great at content in general, see what they are doing well, and try some of that.

Don't be a genius, just get results.

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Sleep should be 8 hours a day and is the foundation of life. If one's bed and sleep habits are not optimized, it can impact a whole day. Air filters can help provide clear air/easier breathing. Try out different pillows until finding one that is suitable. A mattress topper can also add comfort.

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If a student responds with, "I don't know?" about a question they are asked, a teacher can pose that same question to another student, then has the original student simply repeat, rephrase, or add to the answer provided. This way each student knows they cannot simply opt out of answering, by saying "I do not know," but at the same time they can get help when needed.

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The textbook definition of a fever is 100.4 Fahrenheit and 38 Celcius. This number is created by sampling a bunch of people who are considered not sick and using their average temperature as a "norm."

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In order to have a winner, a status game must have a loser. Playing status games makes you an angry combative person, and that's no way to live a happy and fulfilling life.

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Zubovsky can’t provide a specific answer, but thinks that if you follow open AI, you will have a really good sense of what’s possible. He hopes that AI will remove mindless tasks from our lives.

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Because without a market, even a great relentless team with a great product cannot succeed.

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Status is your ranking in the social hierarchy, and unlike money, status is a zero-sum game. If you have an asset, like a house, you are not taking away from another person's ability to acquire a house. On the other hand, if someone's "status ranking" is #3, in order for them to move up, the #2 person has to move out of the way. Sports and politics are some examples of zero-sum games, where in order to have a winner, you have to have a loser.

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A co-founder is a partner. Technical people are in high demand, and if they are willing to join a startup, they are definitely not looking for a job. What they want is to be equal partners, to have a steak in the business, to own something, to have a say.

Realistically, a startup is a long and grueling journey that cofounders take together.

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Price for the amount of time that you are saving the host. Courtland was immediately sold on Bradley's podcast editing services because it was saving him hours every day.

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(1) Implement emergency protocols that removes bureaucratic guidelines and enable widespread testing.

(2) Get test production into US start using new technologies which enable instantaneous testing.

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1) Worrying about something so far out that it might not happen.

The way to stop worrying about future problems is to get more information to understand the problem, and to figure out the next step.

2) Being nervous about the things outside of your control.

As stated, they are outside of your control so there is nothing you can do; the only sensible solution is to stop worrying about them.

3) Worrying about something that you know you need to do, but you also do not want to do, like laying people off, for example.

This is perhaps the most challenging worry as it involves emotions, and emotions are not easily quantified.

To stop worrying about this type of problem, put the emotions aside and think through the logic of the business case first, quantify the business issues. Once you understand why you have to resolve the issue at hand, you will find a way to deal with the emotions of doing it.

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A big as YouTube. In 10 years, every day you'll open Smash Notes and you'll check what is new from your favorite podcasters, and your followers. Then, instead of listening to 20 hours of podcasts, you will get the gist in just a few minutes.

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Nothing that you chase will ever make you happy.

You may think that by getting to a certain outcome or a milestone will make you happy, but when you get there, you will get a short-term boost, and then go back to being unhappy.

To be happy, you have to be happy with self.

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Solve your decision problem first.

Most likely, you don't have too much email, but rather you have a problem deciding what and how to do with your email.

Here is how you could deal with this:

1) Automate most commonly requested emails, and even consider putting a disclaimer on what you will and will not talk about via email.

Put processes in place for your email workflows.

If you get emails that always require a certain type of response, or a follow up, make sure that those processes kick off on their own, without requiring you to participate in the email flow.

Filter anything you don't want to read, and auto-trash useless emails, like out-of-office replies.

2) Use tools like text-expander to fill in auto-responses to common issues. This way you can still sound human, and appear like you are responding with a personal message, while in reality doing almost no work to respond.

3) Set a time for when you processes email, and do not touch your emails in any other time. Also, Do not put aside email that you actually want to respond to. You will never get back to them, so either respond right away, or forget.

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Startup products initially appeal to innovators, people who like to be the first to try the newest thing. They seldom spend a lot of money, but they're super important because they curate new ideas for everyone else who follows.

Then come the visionaries. These people are the trailblazers who are living in the future, and they see an opportunity for a new product to solve a burning problem that's blocking that better future. They're willing to take a leap of faith on a proof of concept.

Then come the pragmatists. No matter how well the product serves their needs, they need social proof to buy it. They're more motivated by not getting fired than by living in the future. They start using a product when they feel left out because all their other friends are starting to use it.

Jeffrey Moore shows that a startup needs to dominate a niche of passionate, visionary early adopters, but then expand from that position of strength, to early niches of pragmatist.

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You hire someone who does! Ramon went to oDesk and hired a freelancer who knew exactly how to write his type of content. She still works at ths company to this day.

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Tikhon was in graduate school in theoretical physics, when he read Paul Graham's essay on How to Start a Startup. Inspired by what he saw, Tikhon applied, not at all sure that he would get in, but once accepted, Tikhon dropped out of grad school and moved to Cambridge, where YC was based at the time. The rest is history!