Rise Seattle on Smash Notes

Rise Seattle podcast.

December 28, 2019

Where's the best place to get a beer in North Seattle? How is our City Council planning to address the growing need for housing affordability? What does it take be a "local" in Seattle today? On the Rise Seattle Podcast you'll hear all this and more. Sit down for intimate discussions with Seattle leaders about the pros and cons of the city's growth and what they are doing amidst the rise.



Recently updated notes

We all need a secure and a safe place to live. Water, food and shelter are the baselines of Maslow's hierarchy of needs. One fundamental realization I’ve learned during our social distancing experience has been how important the home is. Your environment is paramount to your emotional, psychological, mental and even spiritual health. So how has COVID-19 impacted real estate? Where were we at a month ago? Where are we now? Where will we go? 

Key points in this episode

Dr. Dan Hartman is the director of Integrated Development for Global Health at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation here in Seattle, and in this episode of the Rise Seattle podcast, Dan helps us to better understand the ever-evolving situation surrounding COVID-19. 

Dan and podcast host Tyler Davis Jones chat via Zoom, and Dan answers questions like:

  • What is the U.S. healthcare system experiencing now? 
  • Is Washington State on the tail end of this? 
  • When and how do you think we'll get back to normal? 
  • What is the Gates Foundation doing in response to coronavirus? 
  • Where did we go wrong in our response to this? 
  • If you could wave a magic wand and make everyone know and understand one thing, what would it be? 

As a physician trained in internal medicine and pulmonary critical care, Dan now works with a highly talented team in product development assisting the different disease area teams at the foundation.

Dan starts off the episode explaining some of the science behind SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (aka COVID-19):

“It’s very different than the flu… the way it's transmitted is about 2 - 3 times easier than the flu, AND it’s about 10 - 20 times more deadly,” he shares. “When you combine those 2 things together, that’s when you start seeing healthcare systems start to be crushed under the weight of this particular disease.” 

As far as what the U.S. healthcare system is experiencing right now, Dan has heard from friends who still work in hospitals who are experiencing firsthand everything that’s been happening. In the past couple of weeks, COVID-19 has been hitting different parts of the country in waves, and in some places, the majority of patients that are coming into a hospital have COVID-19. Some first responders are also reporting that 90 - 100% of people they’re helping are all dealing with COVID-19. 

While those who need intervention from the healthcare system are in the minority of cases, it’s still enough that in many places, it’s completely overwhelming the healthcare system. Many people can stay at home and get better, but the people who are seeking healthcare are the ones who are experiencing serious respiratory symptoms such as shortness of breath. 

And of course, there are many people who are pre-symptomatic and asymptomatic but aren’t aware of it. 

“What we’re learning is there are a significant number of people who are walking around without symptoms, and that’s both good and bad,” shares Dan. “It’s good that they're not having symptoms, it’s bad that they’re walking around spreading it.” 

COVID-19 has a much longer incubation time than the flu, making the spread even more likely. 

“I think it was a really good idea to start to request that people would wear masks if they’re going outside and are going to be close to people,” Dan says. 

TREATMENT FOR COVID-19

“It’s important for people to understand that there’s no specific therapy to treat SARS-CoV-2 and it’s really just supportive care,” Dan says. There's a lot of misinformation out there right now, and there have been many reports that specific treatments are helping people get better. But anecdotal success stories are much different than actual studies. 

“If you’re on a ventilator in an ICU your probability of getting off is only around 20%. And almost all of those people are getting these drugs,” Dan shares. The drugs that Dan is referring to cover a wide range of potential treatments; if a patient is in serious decline, doctors are using all of the knowledge and tools that they currently have to try their best to treat their patients. Sometimes their methods work, and sometimes they don’t. 

Of course, this is not a long-term strategy, and the Gates Foundation is actively working on treatment options. 

“We’re working on 10 to 15 different products that could work in this area,” shares Dan. 

“It’s great working with two humanitarians like Bill and Melinda, and they jumped into this just like we jumped into Ebola,” says Dan. “For the pandemic we’re currently in the middle of—or even at the beginning of—the response was quick, and we’ve set up all kinds of different things. We have like 20 different workstreams going on looking at a whole host of different signs whether it's therapeutics, diagnostic, vaccines, the [treatments] you’ve mentioned.”

The Gates Foundation is especially focused on how they can help low-income countries deal with this in the near future. Dan paints a picture of what COVID-19 will look like in different low-income countries with fewer resources, and for many, the situation will be much more dire.

 

WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? 

“I think Seattle has done a really good job in terms of trying to control this. We were the first city to really have to deal with this,” shares Dan. 

But while Washington State may be “flattening the curve,” Dan adds that “the delta between where we’re at today and where we need to be is still far.” 

Tyler asks what our new norm is. How do we come out of this, and what’s the trajectory? Tyler also wonders if wearing a mask to the grocery store for the rest of our lives is the new normal, or if we just need to do this for the next few months. 

Dan thinks the answer is somewhere in the middle. “This does not have an off switch,” he says. “There’s a whole bunch of different things that need to happen before we come out of what I might call Phase 1 and into Phase 2. So we’re going to have to see the number of cases continue to drop dramatically so we know that there’s not ongoing transmission. We’re going to have to have testing widely available.”

That brings up a few big questions: When will we have enough tests? And where did we fail in this situation when it comes to testing? 

“I think we failed in just about every way imaginable,” Dan says.

Not only did we not have a great test, but the test we did have wasn’t widely available. Even when a test was available, it became about whether or not you could get the results back in a timely way so you could actually act on the results. Then, even if there are enough tests, they might run out of nasal swabs, for example. 

“I think with the information that I have today, life will be different until we get a vaccine, and that’s 12 to 24 months away. How different it will be I think remains to be seen… It will be different, I’m predicting for months, if not years, and restrictions that we’re going to have could change over that time period too.” 

“There really isn’t going to be an off switch to this,” Dan adds. “There’s going to be an off ramp. So what we can all do is pay attention to good information and try to adhere to the guidelines. Where am I hearing the best information? Probably people like Dr. Fauci from the NIH… he’s really been spot on with all of his advice.” 

At this point, Dan says that experts aren’t positive yet as to whether or not those who have had COVID-19 are immune to getting the virus again. There are some reports that people have had it twice already, but the evidence is not concrete enough to know for sure. Either way, “Everybody should have some type of test of immunity at some point,” he says. 

Once many people can return to their normal everyday lives, there are healthcare experts who are saying that people over 60 should probably continue to shelter in place as best they can. “I joke with my parents who are 84, the next time I see you, I’ll be bringing a vaccine,” adds Dan. 

With the economy taking the hit that it has, it also has people wondering if the cure is worse than the disease. “I think the disease is probably worse than the cure, but at a certain point, that will flip, and people just have to get out and the economy has to get going again,” Dan shares. “But we have to do it in a smart way and this is where we use the best science that we have today to make those decisions.”

“I’m quite hopeful that we’ll get out of it, I just don’t know what that will look like. And I'm energized to try to be part of a group that’s working on ways to get us out of it. This is something like none of us has ever seen in our lives.” 

Dan leaves us with some other great advice that we can all use as we take on the challenging days ahead: 

“Be smart, be kind, and be safe.” 

Here are a few links that you may find useful: 

Dr. Dan Hartman at the Gates Foundation | Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Website | Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases Tracker by Johns Hopkins University

Key points in this episode

Homeowners, renters, and Seattle in general all stand to benefit from an increase in DADUs, but all too frequently, the cost of building a DADU can be prohibitively expensive. Then MyKabin came along. 

In this episode of the Rise Seattle Podcast, host Tyler Davis Jones sits down with Rob Hill from MyKabin, an innovative company that builds DADUs in the backyards of single-family homes in Seattle for a flat-rate price. Not only does this offer homeowners a cost-effective and convenient way to invest, DADUs help to increase the density and diversity of Seattle’s neighborhoods. Tyler and Rob also dive into everything from the specific steps that go into the MyKabin building process to how much these DADUs can rent for. 

Key points in this episode

Jesse Bradley is a former professional soccer goalkeeper (played in Zimbabwe, Africa and Aberdeen, Scotland), radio host,
podcaster, author, and speaker. At Dartmouth College, Jesse took an Intro to World Religions course that sparked a curiosity about faith traditions giving him a sense that there was far more to this life than what meets the eye. After surviving several close calls with death, Jesse has developed a gratitude for every new day and opportunity to encourage people in their journey. 

On this episode, Tyler asks honest questions about Christianity and the church. Jesse shares his inspiring story of facing his own mortality and finding a new identity and passion. He also talks about his vision for an evolution of faith communities across the Puget Sound and beyond.  

Key points in this episode

INTRO

Let's face it, wine shopping is overwhelming.

When you walk into a grocery store or wine shop you’re confronted with hundreds of options. How do you pick a decent bottle? Wouldn’t it be nice if there was someone there with you to suggest a few?

Crunchy Red Fruit is based in Seattle and acts as your own personal Master Sommelier .  They curate and send you wines you love to drink. Wines that tell a story. Wines that are different from what’s offered at big box stores. 

Most of the wine bought and drank in the US today is made in bulk quantities, using machine-harvested grapes and utilizing heavy chemical intervention in both the vineyard and winery. These wines are full of ingredients that we can’t pronounce, and look more at home on a shampoo bottle than on something that you’re going to drink.

Jackson Rohrbaugh, founder and president of Crunchy Red Fruit wants to show you a better way. 

Jackson has a passion for sharing wine from small grape producers who work organically in their vineyards and don’t obscure the natural taste of their grapes with chemical intervention in the winery. His company works with wineries that are transparent in their process, and are honest about what they create. They believe that this honesty makes for more interesting wines in the end.

Jackson is additionally the former Master Sommelier for Seattle’s most famous gourmet restaurant Canlis, and was born and raised in surrounding area in Gig Harbor.

JACKSON'S STORY

In this episode Tyler and Jackson start the conversation by cracking open a bottle of vino.

"I'm always tasting." Rohrbaugh said, "part of this business is trying to figure out what are the wines that make sense for my business, what's going to go in the box...there's a lot of things I am on the hunt for in a bottle of wine that other people aren't on the hunt for, I have my own specific criteria." 

"This is a wine that someone is an importer sent me samples of. It's pretty cool having wine coming to your door all the time," Jackson continued.

They two men are sipping on a Pinotage from South Africa...it's made by Painted Wolf.

"Pinotage is interesting because it is not the favorite grape of Sommeliers. It's usually relegated to garbage bin status, " Jackson said. 

It is then revealed that Pinotage is even equated to a "rubber band, band-aid" taste.

Fortunately for Tyler, Jackson assures him as is not the case with the Painted Wolf Pinotage.

Tyler takes a sip and the two agree the wine meets both their criteria. Tyler then goes into Jackson's personal story, starting with the German roots of that hard to pronounce last name. 

The discussion then goes into German wine and a Sommelier favorite German Riesling. Jackson calls German Riesling "undervalued" and says that you can get amazing bottle of German Riesling for $15 to $20. 

"Riesling was once the most expensive wine available," Jackson said. He blames this on a sweeter pallet of people living centuries ago. 

Jackson may have German roots but was born and raised in Gig Harbor and went to college at the University of Washington. He now resides in Seattle with his family. 

Jackson was introduced to the world of gourmet food and wine while living abroad for a year in Italy. During the conversation, Jackson speaks a bit of Italian to illustrate his time in the place internationally known for incredible food and wine.

Jackson said he returned to Seattle for the natural beauty and the exceptional produce.

"We have the greatest oysters in the world, some of the greatest salmon...it's pretty cool to live here with the quality of our natural products and fresh air..." Jackson said. 

Where did this love for quality food come from? Tyler asked.

"My mom was a great cook, we didn't grow up with a ton, my parents cleaned houses to make ends meet and that was after their day jobs and so she knew how to do a lot with a little and she had great recipes that we came to know and love," Jackson said. 

JACKSON'S CAREER

Tyler dives deeper into what it was like working for the Seattle-famous Canlis family and the stigma surrounding gourmet food. 

"It is expensive to dine there and wealth and equality is a thing in our society and I would never want to gloss over that. But the point is the people behind it have huge hearts and are super generous and have taught so many other people who have worked there or been guests there or vendors who have sold there and you learn how to treat everyone with generosity and hospitality when you are in that system, it's not about exclusion or making someone feel bad. It's about welcoming them in and that's formed my life in a huge way, and my business in a huge way and who I am...and that's the biggest take away from working there." Jackson said. 

"It's face to face, I am here for you, I embrace you," Jackson continued. 

THE SOMMELIER CERTIFICATION PROCESS

So, what does it actually take to become a Master Sommelier? 

NOTEWORTHY QUESTIONS

  • Why was it so hard? 
  • Which part of the test was the most difficult? 
  • What advice would you give someone wanting to do something hard that requires failure?
  • What interested you about wine that inspired you to do it as a profession?

JACKSON'S COMPANY

A Bite into the Crunchy Red Fruit

NOTEWORTHY QUESTIONS

  • Why start the company?
  • How does it work? 
  • What’s it cost? 
  • What wines do you have in the current box? 
  • Why did you choose them? 

SEATTLE'S WINE ECOSYSTEM

NOTEWORTHY QUESTIONS

  • What do you think of the culture here in Seattle? 
  • Are there cities that are bigger wine cities? 
  • How has tech played a role in wine? 
  • Where do you see Seattle in the next 10 years? 
  • Where do you see the wine world in the next 10 years? 
  • What’s your biggest hope for Seattle? 

Jackson also let's us know his two favorite places to grab wine and dinner in the city.

"If you want a really fun french bistro vibe...go to Le Caviste...killer little champagne and wine bar," Jackson said. 

La Caviste is located at 1919 7th Ave.

"If you want your pallet stretched and want to taste something funky, a little off the beaten path go to Bar Ferdinand in Capitol Hill," he said. 

"They are going to pour you things that will stretch your imagination a little bit," Jackson said. 

FIND JACKSON

Jackson Rohrbaugh: InstagramFacebook, Website 

Key points in this episode

INTRO

Let's face it, wine shopping is overwhelming.

When you walk into a grocery store or wine shop you’re confronted with hundreds of options. How do you pick a decent bottle? Wouldn’t it be nice if there was someone there with you to suggest a few?

Crunchy Red Fruit is based in Seattle and acts as your own personal Master Sommelier .  They curate and send you wines you love to drink. Wines that tell a story. Wines that are different from what’s offered at big box stores. 

Most of the wine bought and drank in the US today is made in bulk quantities, using machine-harvested grapes and utilizing heavy chemical intervention in both the vineyard and winery. These wines are full of ingredients that we can’t pronounce, and look more at home on a shampoo bottle than on something that you’re going to drink.

Jackson Rohrbaugh, founder and president of Crunchy Red Fruit wants to show you a better way. 

Jackson has a passion for sharing wine from small grape producers who work organically in their vineyards and don’t obscure the natural taste of their grapes with chemical intervention in the winery. His company works with wineries that are transparent in their process, and are honest about what they create. They believe that this honesty makes for more interesting wines in the end.

Jackson is additionally the former Master Sommelier for Seattle’s most famous gourmet restaurant Canlis, and was born and raised in surrounding area in Gig Harbor.

JACKSON'S STORY

In this episode Tyler and Jackson start the conversation by cracking open a bottle of vino.

"I'm always tasting." Rohrbaugh said, "part of this business is trying to figure out what are the wines that make sense for my business, what's going to go in the box...there's a lot of things I am on the hunt for in a bottle of wine that other people aren't on the hunt for, I have my own specific criteria." 

"This is a wine that someone is an importer sent me samples of. It's pretty cool having wine coming to your door all the time," Jackson continued.

They two men are sipping on a Pinotage from South Africa...it's made by Painted Wolf.

"Pinotage is interesting because it is not the favorite grape of Sommeliers. It's usually relegated to garbage bin status, " Jackson said. 

It is then revealed that Pinotage is even equated to a "rubber band, band-aid" taste.

Fortunately for Tyler, Jackson assures him as is not the case with the Painted Wolf Pinotage.

Tyler takes a sip and the two agree the wine meets both their criteria. Tyler then goes into Jackson's personal story, starting with the German roots of that hard to pronounce last name. 

The discussion then goes into German wine and a Sommelier favorite German Riesling. Jackson calls German Riesling "undervalued" and says that you can get amazing bottle of German Riesling for $15 to $20. 

"Riesling was once the most expensive wine available," Jackson said. He blames this on a sweeter pallet of people living centuries ago. 

Jackson may have German roots but was born and raised in Gig Harbor and went to college at the University of Washington. He now resides in Seattle with his family. 

Jackson was introduced to the world of gourmet food and wine while living abroad for a year in Italy. During the conversation, Jackson speaks a bit of Italian to illustrate his time in the place internationally known for incredible food and wine.

Jackson said he returned to Seattle for the natural beauty and the exceptional produce.

"We have the greatest oysters in the world, some of the greatest salmon...it's pretty cool to live here with the quality of our natural products and fresh air..." Jackson said. 

Where did this love for quality food come from? Tyler asked.

"My mom was a great cook, we didn't grow up with a ton, my parents cleaned houses to make ends meet and that was after their day jobs and so she knew how to do a lot with a little and she had great recipes that we came to know and love," Jackson said. 

JACKSON'S CAREER

Tyler dives deeper into what it was like working for the Seattle-famous Canlis family and the stigma surrounding gourmet food. 

"It is expensive to dine there and wealth and equality is a thing in our society and I would never want to gloss over that. But the point is the people behind it have huge hearts and are super generous and have taught so many other people who have worked there or been guests there or vendors who have sold there and you learn how to treat everyone with generosity and hospitality when you are in that system, it's not about exclusion or making someone feel bad. It's about welcoming them in and that's formed my life in a huge way, and my business in a huge way and who I am...and that's the biggest take away from working there." Jackson said. 

"It's face to face, I am here for you, I embrace you," Jackson continued. 

THE SOMMELIER CERTIFICATION PROCESS

So, what does it actually take to become a Master Sommelier? 

NOTEWORTHY QUESTIONS

  • Why was it so hard? 
  • Which part of the test was the most difficult? 
  • What advice would you give someone wanting to do something hard that requires failure?
  • What interested you about wine that inspired you to do it as a profession?

JACKSON'S COMPANY

A Bite into the Crutchy Red Fruit

NOTEWORTHY QUESTIONS

Why start the company?

What need are you satisfying? 

How does it work? 

What’s it cost? 

What wines do you have in the current box? 

Why did you choose them? 

What’s your favorite part about your job? 

SEATTLE'S WINE ECOSYSTEM

NOTEWORTHY QUESTIONS

What do you think of the culture here in Seattle? 

What advantages does Seattle have over other cities in terms of wine? 

Are there cities that are bigger wine cities? 

What are some of the best places to grab wine here in Seattle? 

How has tech played a role in wine? 

What’s it like running a business here? 

Where do you see Seattle in the next 10 years? 

Where do you see the wine world in the next 10 years? 

In your opinion, what makes a good entrepreneur?   

What’s your biggest hope for Seattle? 

FIND JACKSON

Jackson Rohrbaugh: Instagram, Facebook, Website 

Key points in this episode

A question Tyler asks every guest at the end of each show is “What is your biggest fear for Seattle.” The number one answer to this question (in over 80 episodes) is that we don’t want Seattle to become San Francisco, but what does that mean? Butch Haze – one of the “Top 100 “real estate agents in the country joins the show to talk about what we can learn from San Francisco now to change Seattle’s future and how we can get into “the game” of real estate in an ever-growing costly market.

Key points in this episode

Sarah Adler returns! Back with a new book, new mission and new baby! Sarah is a Seattle native, best-selling healthy cookbook author, nutrition coach, healthy lifestyle expert, food blogger, real food lover and owner of Simply Real Health—a healthy lifestyle company on a mission to educate, teach, and inspire others to live their happiest and healthiest life. She’s back to talk about her new book Simply Real Eating and how her life and business has changed since. 

On today's episode we dive deep into what it was like to write a second book after such monumental success with her first. What it's like running a business while being a new mom, how to get your little one to eat healthy foods and how her business has evolved specifically to helping women create healthier lifestyles that last.

Key points in this episode

In the wake of the Australia fires it's more evident than ever that climate change is impacting our world. But what can we do as individuals to make an impact? Chris Hanson is the COO of Sage Conservation, a Seattle based efficiency consulting firm that offers services to help you optimize your building’s performance. Sage has created a comprehensive audit process to help you lower your operating costs of your home or commercial buildings while you relax. I've hired Sage for my personal home as well as for my clients. Not only did Chris' team save us over $200 a year, he showed us how much water we'd be saving and the impact that will make on the environment. This is an episode you won't want to miss. 

Key points in this episode

After spending years as a wedding and events planner running her small business Anticipate Weddings & Events, Amy had a dream to use her event planning skills to bring women together in a social setting to create together and learn from each other while trying something. Out this dream Social Creative was born.

Social Creative is a Seattle based business that provides a way to collaborate with different creatives and local businesses by hosting workshops with the sole purpose of bringing women together to be social and creative.

On today's episode Amy discusses the biggest lessons she's learned in the time she's been running her business. What advice she would give to someone wanting to start their own thing. And what it's like running a small business here in Seattle.  

Key points in this episode

Moira Bugler and Mel Arnold Gillett are the Co-Owners and Co-Directors of Emerald City Dance Complex, an urban dance studio that offers a warm and creative space to grow your love of dance. Located near the heart of downtown Seattle in the historic SODO neighborhood, Emerald City Dance Complex is offers dance classes and technical training for both recreational students and competitive dancers. From Ballet to Jazz. Hip Hop to Tap. Emerald City Dance Complex offers all types of classes for all types of dancers. 

On this episode Moira and Mel share their biggest take aways from starting a small business in Seattle, what the Seattle dance scene is like and how dance can teach you to relax, focus and become more confident.

Key points in this episode

Jason Mesnik rose to pop culture fame after being the runner-up on season 4 of ABC's The Bachelorette. Shortly after, America fell in love with him as he was chosen to be the first single dad Bachelor on season 13.

Rewind back to the final rose ceremony where Jason was choosing between Mellisa and Molly. What was going through his head when he sent Molly home and asked Melissa to marry him? Why did he change his mind? What was that like for Molly? 

What was it like to be the Bachelor? What's it like behind the scenes? What was his biggest take away from the experience? 

Today, Jason finds himself in a post-celebrity life selling real estate on the Eastside. What has that transition been like for him and Molly?   

We go deep on one of the longest RSP shows ever. We hope you enjoy this as much as Tyler and Jason did.

Key points in this episode

Rudy Willingham is a Seattle native that has recently been catapulted into the limelight with his incredibly creative and Seattle forward Instagram account, @rudy_willingham. From elevator decals featuring Russell Wilson throwing the perfect pass to Tyler Lockett - to a woman wearing beer filled Das Boots at the Rhein Haus. Rudy has found a way to creatively capture remarkable images by blending two Seattle pop culture subjects together. Rudy and Tyler have a joy filled discussion about what it takes to be a creative and what it’s like to run an Advertising and Social Media Marketing agency in Seattle.

Key points in this episode

Kimberlee Gorsline is the founder and CEO of Kimberlee Marie Interiors, one of the top luxury interior design companies here in Seattle. Her team's mission is to simplify the decorating process. On this episode we discuss what it’s like to run a small business in Seattle, practical tips on how to spruce up your home and what the design world is like here in Seattle. If you’re like us, you find it overwhelming to find the perfect items to decorate your home. Luckily on this episode - Kim has you covered with her new company Placed!

Key points in this episode

It’s the conversation we’re all having. Seattle is a tech city. Whether you like it or not technology is here to stay. And with it comes higher cost of living, beautiful new buildings and more people. 

On today’s episode Tyler sits down with Paul Peterman, the Regional President of Compass. Compass is a heavily funded real estate startup that just opened its tech center in Amazon's SLU neighborhood. Paul has spent his career helping companies innovate and reach their full potential. From beginning his career with the Seattle Sonics to leading the Technology & Connectivity team at Facebook for over 8 years while helping them grow their Seattle presence. Paul has since taken the role of Regional President for Compass Washington to lead the mission of helping everyone find their place in the NW.

We talk about the Seattle technology culture and why Compass chose Seattle as it’s West Coast Engineering hub. Paul also shares a few stories of his time at Facebook with Mark Zuckerberg and where he sees the future of the social media giant. 

Key points in this episode

If you're like most of us, you've dreamed of being a rock star. Standing on stage singing to thousands as they chant your name. It takes a special person to pursue that dream. It takes tremendous courage to do it at 17. Laureli is a Seattle based seventeen-year-old pop singer who has been making music since she could talk. Influenced by artists similar to Ariana Grande, Billie Eilish, and Post Malone, her music has evolved into a powerful blend of pop/trap instrumentals with lush vocal melodies. Her dream is to share her unfiltered emotions, confidence, and self-love with the world. On today's episode Tyler and Laureli talk about growing up in Seattle, the Seattle music scene and how she's hustling to make her dream become a reality. 

Key points in this episode

Dr. Deborah J Oyer, MD is a Seattle based Doctor with 32 years of experience. She currently serves at the Cedar River Clinic specializing in Adult and  Family Medicine. Recently, Dr. Oyer was featured on the critically acclaimed documentary called Our Bodies Our Doctors, where she defends the importance of birth control and access to abortions. On today’s episode we get into this controversial topic and break down both sides. We also discuss how Seattle is leading the charge on women’s rights across the country. 

This is a difficult topic to discuss, so if you’re listening with you kids or are triggered by what we’re saying please turn this off and come back next week. Let's be brave and respectful together and approach this episode with curiosity and no judgement. 

Key points in this episode

Jason Caveness is a U.S. Army retiree who became involved with the tech and startup scene here in Seattle after a long career in the military. After working in the college recruiting space here in Seattle for a few years, Jason noticed that small businesses desperately needed help with recruiting but often couldn't afford to work with a big recruiting firm.

That's when we decided to branched out on his own to start cavnesHR, a tech recruiting firm that gives quality HR services to businesses no bigger than 49 employees. Using technology to empower small businesses to get the right candidate for the right price.

Jason spends what little free time her serving as the Seattle City Leader for Bunker Labs - a national non profit that helps Veterans and Military Spouses start businesses.He also is the host of the cavnessHR podcast where he talks to small business owners, founders and people in tech, startups and HR. 

Jason's goal is to serve his clients with value and integrity. Sit back and enjoy an honest conversation with a Seattle tech/service business owner.

Key points in this episode

Yusef Nadir moved to Seattle from the Big Island of Hawaii when he was in high school with his mother. As a single mother to 4 boys, Yusef s mom did everything in her power to ensure the best life for her kids. After graduating from the University of Washington, Yuesf went on to work in Property Management here in Seattle focussing on HOA management, large scale apartments and micro-units. After 10 years in the business he moved into residential real estate at RE Max NW Realtors in Northgate. Yusef now serves as a Director at Large for the Seattle King County Realtors Association and re-elected for 2020. Join the conversation as we discuss what it was like to grow up in Seattle, how the Seattle market has shifted in favor of buyers and how the National Association of Realtors is evolving towards a more moderate and inclusive position as millennial members become more involved.

 

Key points in this episode

John B Johnson is the Identity Architect at a small studio, a design studio specializing in branding and design systems. Since its inception, John’s team has worked with over 30 different companies and generated over $300k in revenue. 

John and his wife moved to Seattle in 2017 charged with an entrepreneurial passion to create community and inspire entrepreneurs. 

John also started the 1 million cups Seattle chapter, a networking group that gives Seattle business professionals a space to learn, grow and share ideas. Through this work he intends to create a more inclusive city for newcomers.

Many people move to the city to take from its resources. John is one of the few who has moved here to serve it. But getting to a place of altruism and peace hasn't come without its challenges. John describes how his childhood, shaped him int the man he is today.

 

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In a world of technology and data, there has been a lot of critique on the FINANCIAL Services industry. Why pay an advisor big bucks to do something an index fund could?

On today’s episode I sit down with Will Hicks, Founder and solo-practitioner of Sapling Wealth Management, LLC. Will started his career on Wall Street in 1986 and was one of the first analysts to cover Real Estate Investment Trusts and Master Limited Partnerships. Later, he specialized in health care service stocks and was voted an “All-Star” analyst by the Wall Street Journal.

These days, he lives the Seattle dream running Sapling from his home office in the delightful neighborhood of Queen Anne.

On today’s episode we discuss how an investment adviser can add approximately 3.0% to annual returns over time. How certain tax levers can be pulled to save big on healthcare expenses and how to know whether you should invest in the market or put your money into real estate.

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It seems in today’s divisive political environment, not many people have positive things to say about politicians. In episodes past we’ve had conversations about Seattle city council decisions that have left the city split. As we approach Seattle’s Primary Election‎ on August 6th and General Election‎: ‎November 5th, we wanted to give Seattleites a way to hear and get to know who they’re voting for.  For the next few months Tyler will be interviewing select City Council Candidates from each district.

Our first guest in this series is Terry Rice, a Seattle City Council Candidate for District 6. Terry describes himself as a practical progressive candidate. His upbringing with a single mom of 4 who worked multiple jobs and relied on government funded services to survive and eventually thrive has driven him run for office. His experience in travel and technology business has given him a skill to assess complex issues and problem solve using the best data.

He is a native of the Pacific Northwest and has lived his entire adult life here in Seattle.

Terry is running for office because he believes in maintaining a business climate that is hospitable to economic growth, while holding businesses accountable to the community.

 

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Pete Rex is the founder and CEO of Trustwork, a comprehensive technology platform that gives entrepreneurs in major cities across the US the power to create and grow businesses, obtain capital and build brands. Pete was a young real estate mogul who built a billion-dollar real estate company from the ground up and is now using his capital to build an ambitious technology aiming to help the small businesses and disadvantaged working class.

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On today’s episode we talk about how Seattle Prohibition consumed Seattle, igniting a war that lasted nearly twenty years and played out in the streets, waterways and even town hall.

Brad Holden is an author, historian, and finder of old Seattle things. His Instagram @seattle_artifacts is a treasure trove of old Seattle artifacts that he finds all over the city. Brad recently wrote a book called, Seattle Prohibition: Bootleggers, Rumrunners and Graft in the Queen City.

We hope you enjoy today’s episode of spectacular stories of Seattle in the time of Prohibition. Stick around to the end of the episode to find out how you could win a free copy of Brad’s book Seattle Prohibition for yourself.

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As a Seattle Real Estate Agent, I’m often asked, "Are we headed for another housing bubble?" While my team and I watch the market closely, I’m hesitant to answer that question with authority. I can tell you what our local housing market is doing but I can’t speak for the entire King County, let alone the nation.

On today’s episode, I sit down with someone who can answer that question and more.

Matthew Gardner is the Chief Economist for Windermere Real Estate and is responsible for analyzing and interpreting economic data and its impact on the real estate market on both a local and national level. Matthew has over 28 years of professional experience both in the U.S. and U.K. He also contributes regularly to Reuters’, Home Price Forecast Survey and Zillow’s Home Price Expectation Survey.

We dive deep into topics like:

- How Trump’s economic policies are affecting our local and national economy

- How the Seattle business ecosystem and culture are affected by our current policies

- How we, as a city, are embracing upzoning and paving the way for our economic future

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We see it everyday. The tents, the trash, the drugs. Everyday, we walk by people who are struggling, flying cardboard signs asking for money or food. Should we give? Say hi? Or just pass by? On one hand the heart wants to help a struggling neighbor. On the other, the mind wonders what the person will do with the money you gave them. 

Homelessness is a complicated issue. As the city rises our problems rise with it. It seems that every problem that’s solved, another one gets created. Recently, KOMO news released a documentary called "Seattle is Dying" which now has over 3.1 million views. Whether you liked it or not, it’s sparked a passionate and politically fueled debate where both sides are screaming at each other.

On today’s episode, we sit down with someone who is actually homeless. Raven Crowfoot moved to Seattle in 2003 to be with his mom. Little did he know, his mom had a severe drug addiction. In 2004 they were kicked out of their home and Raven has been living on the streets ever since.  We dive into what it’s like to be homeless, how difficult it is to get housing, how Seattle is considered a paradise for homeless folks and what it’s like to stay sober while living on the streets.

We also talk with Samaritan Co-Founder, Jason Keil. Samaritan is a Seattle based tech company that is using app technology to give homeless people dignity, respect and community while offering vital services in the moment of need.

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Bryan and Becca Pape are the Co-Founders of MiiR. A Seattle based product to project company that designs and creates world-class drinkware products that empower people for a better future. For every product sold they set aside a portion of revenue from the sale to give to organizations with sustainable methods of empowerment. To date they’ve given $850,000 to organizations making change in the world and impacted over 100,000+ people’s lives for the better.

It’s hard to go into a Seattle coffee shop and not spot their award winning camp cups, tumblers or growlers. They’ve partnered with world renowned brands like Patagonia, Blue Bottle and Starbucks and have empowered thousands of businesses create a meaningful and lasting product for events and merchandising, including Rise Seattle.

But creating a globally recognized brand doesn’t come without struggle. Sit back and enjoy an honest conversation with two authentic and brilliant Seattleites trying to create something bigger than themselves while raising a family and giving back.

Stick around for the full interview to hear the newest addition to the MiiR product fleet.

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Todd Bishop is the co-founder and editor of GeekWire, the nationally recognized technology news site based right here in Seattle, WA. GeekWire’s large audience consists of of loyal, tech-savvy readers around the globe, who follow the site for breaking news, expert analysis and unique insights into the technology industry.

Todd is a longtime technology journalist who has spent his career covering tech giants such as Amazon, Apple, Microsoft and Google. As a California native, Bishop moved to the Pacific NorthWest in the early 2000’s to start his journalism career at the Seattle P-I followed by the Puget Sound Business Journal. In 2011 Todd and his journalism colleague and co-founder, John Cook started GeekWire.

But starting a technology news company from scratch isn’t always easy. Join the conversation with Todd as we discuss what it was like to take the leap of faith from a stable job with benefits to a start-up dream. We also discuss Seattle’s unprecedented tech ecosystem, Todd’s current favorite Seattle companies and GeekWire’s unique and sustainable business model.

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Benjamin Schmitt is the Best Book Award and Pushcart nominated author of three books, most recently Soundtrack to a Fleeting Masculinity. His poems have appeared in the Antioch Review, Hobart, Worcester Review, Columbia Review, Roanoke Review, and elsewhere. He’s the co-founder of Pacifica Writers’ Workshop, and has also written articles for The Seattle Times and At The Inkwell. Ben lives in Seattle with his wife and children.

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Shane Kovalsky and Vince Coppola are the Co-founders of Mystery, a Seattle based company that sends you on your own personalized adventure to unique restaurants, bars, and experiences. For an added twist, they keep each destination a surprise until you get there. The excitement is in experiencing the thrill of not knowing what's next. But starting a company isn’t all fun and games, Shane and Vince share what it’s really  like to create a new idea from scratch. As a special thanks to Rise Seattle listeners, they’ve offered to waive their $20 processing fee if you use the promo code RISE.

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After 14 years of being stay-at-home moms and recently having launched their youngest kids off to full-day school, best friends Kristi Brumbaugh & Brooke Anderson wanted something more out of life. They had worked hard to create more space in their lives to do the things they loved and wanted to help others do the same. Out this vision, Studio Life Seattle was born. Studio Life is a premier event, workshop and class space in the University District.  On today’s episode we talk with these two inspiring Mom-prenuers redefining their next season in life with art and beauty. After the interview check out studiolifeseattle.com for upcoming classes their offering and use the offer code RISE for 10% off.

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These days, it seems you can’t go to a dinner party or coffee shop without hearing something about the Enneagram. But what is this ancient personality typing test? On today’s episode, Tyler sits down with Marilyn Vancil, an author, trained spiritual director, coach and Certified Enneagram Professional to dive deep into understanding the Enneagram and how this ancient practice can transform our lives for the better. We also discuss how Seattle’s collective Enneagram number is pushing our city forward.

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While some industries have made headwind in attracting women to the workforce, the technology industry continues to fall behind. According to a 2016 Women in the Workplace Study by McKinsey & Co and Leanin.org, the gender gap between women and corporate America is still prevalent in the tech industry. The research states that there are only 36% women workers in entry level positions, 25% in VP roles, and only 17% in C-suite executive roles.

In 1987, Mukilteo, WA resident and computer scientist Dr. Anita Borg set out to make an impact on this gender gap by starting a digital community for women in computing called Systers. Since then, this community has grown into a leading organization for women in technology. Today, AnitaB.org works with women technologists and in more than 50 countries and partners with leading academic institutions and fortune 500 companies.

On today’s episode, Tyler sits down with Anita Borg Institute Community Leaders, Professor Sheila Oh, who serves as the Senior Instructor and Director of the Computer Science Fundamentals Certificate Program at Seattle University and Ross Smith, Director of Skype for Good at Microsoft. They discuss the gender gap in technology and how we as a society can change it together.

They also discuss how you can make an impact on the gender gap in technology by attending the upcoming Hopper X 1 Seattle Women in Tech Conference taking place March 22nd - 23rd. Tickets are available February 13th here. Don’t wait too long to register as tickets sold out within 36 hours last year!

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Let’s face it Seattle. Our homelessness issue continues to grow everyday. While there are many companies and organizations doing their part, I often wonder what tangible act I can do to make an impact on our homeless neighbors lives. Well today is our chance to make that difference.

On today’s episode, I sit down with my good friend and long-time Seattle homeless advocate, Tyler Gorsline. Tyler is the lead pastor at A Seattle Church, a church start up downtown that’s focus is to serve the city of Seattle’s greatest needs. ASC has partnered with The Collective, a popular urban co-working space and social club on Dexter in downtown Seattle, to open the doors to hundreds of Seattle homeless, fix them a meal and give them a coat.

Listen in as we discuss unorthodox faith in a liberal city, and how you listener can make a tangible impact on those sleeping on our cold streets.

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Ever wonder why Lake City way gets such a bad rap? From pot shops to strip clubs, Lake City has often been seen as the blemish on Seattle’s sexy tech image. But little do the haters know, Lake City is one of Seattle’s cultural and culinary treasures. From world class beer to authentic globally inspired cuisine, Lake City offers a part of Seattle that has almost been forgotten. On today’s episode, Tyler sits down with Lake City native, Thomas Kohnstamm.Thomas is the author of the new novel Lake City as well as the memoir Do Travel Writers Go to Hell? His dry and witty perspective on Seattle’s changing landscape is perfect for Rise Seattle’s first episode of 2019.

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Buki is a Seattle based clothing company that uses state of the art fiber technology to create luxurious clothing that is breathable, sustainable and machine-washable.

On today’s episode, Tyler sits down with Buki founders and married couple Joey Rodolfo and Stacy Bennett. They tell stories of their experience working with Seattle clothing giants like Union Bay, Callaway, Eddie Bauer and Nordstrom. And how they’re using their expertise to change the clothing industry globally.

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We all want to make an impact on the world. Whether it’s consuming products responsibly or choosing a career that serves others, as Seattleites, we all are striving to make our city and the greater world around us better.

 

On today's episode Tyler sits down with Seattle serial entrepreneur, Brian Howe. Bryan has started and sold his own socially conscious law firm, founded Impact Hub - a co-working space geared towards nonprofits and B Corp companies and has recently co-founded and is the acting CEO at Format Health - a company that’s built a mobile Cardiac Arrest Guidance System that is saving lives and innovating health care data capturing at the same time.

But while starting a company is one thing, growing it into a flourishing business is another. Hear Brian's advice on how to begin your big idea and and stay motivated through it all. We also discuss why Seattle is the perfect place to start.

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Ever had an idea for a business but didn't know where to start to create it? Research shows that one of the key barriers to a successful and sustainable company is a lack of mentorship and camaraderie. On today's episode, Tyler talks with Aswin Pranam, Co-Director at the Founder Institute Seattle - the world's premier pre-seed startup accelerator.

Topics Discussed:
- How the Seattle startup scene is different from San Francisco
- How you can apply to FI for free as a Rise Seattle Listener

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Happy Halloween Seattle! On today’s episode, Tyler sits down with biz-tech guru and Director of Program Management in Data Science and Analytics at Nordstrom, Wayne Heller. While Wayne has a lot to say about the Seattle business world, this is no ordinary episode and Wayne is no ordinary guest. For the past 10 years, his family picks a theme and decorates their house with Hollywood worthy props and sound. From a Willy Wonka theme with an actual chocolate river to a Stranger Things theme with electrical current patterns flowing through lights. This episode is sure to inspire you to get creative with those you love this Halloween. Sit back and enjoy this special spooky edition of the Rise Seattle podcast.

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Zach Wingfield is a creative producer and visionary filmmaker based out of Seattle, WA. With over 42k YouTube subscribers to his channel ZwingFilms, Zach has built a platform that’s allowed him to work with some of the most prestigious car brands around the world. From filming a FERRARI crashing into a wall in Dubai to hosting the first ever Zwingrally from Seattle to Seaside, OR, Zach’s goal has always been to bring car enthusiasts together all over the world through his work. But building an authentic lifestyle car brand in Seattle from scratch doesn’t come without struggle. Sit back and enjoy my interview with Zach Wingfield as he shares stories from his world travels in the car industry and the many lessons he’s learned from an aspiring entrepreneur in Seattle.

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Since September 2016, Seattle has been the hottest housing market in the country. Home prices here have grown about $200,000. But all of that changed in August of 2018 when inventory almost tripled and home prices fell on average $25,000. So what does this mean for the Seattle housing market? Will we see another housing crash like in 2008? Will we lose all of the equity our investments have gained? Will we be okay, Seattle?

Tyler discusses all of that and more on today’s episode of the Rise Seattle Podcast.

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What was the Seattle skateboarding scene like in the 80’s and 90's? How has the internet impacted skateboarding culture? What does Seattle think of skaters today? Who better to ask than the Grandfather of Seattle Skateboarding, Marshall Stack Reid.

For over 30 years, Marshall has organized skate competitions, started skate companies and been an outspoken activist for the skateboarding community in Seattle. But looking out for Seattle’s future skate scene doesn't come without a few fights with the city. 

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La Marzocco has been the leader in espresso machine innovations since 1927 and has helped to build the Seattle coffee community into the robust, quality-driven industry that it is today.

In 2016, La Marzocco opened its cafe and showroom collaboration with KEXP across from Key Arena in downtown Seattle - a cafe experiment where each month, a new, coffee roaster or coffee brand from across the world takes over their cafe space.

Join the conversation as Tyler sits down with La Marzocco USA General Manager, Andrew Daday, to discuss how his team is leading the caffeinated pursuit of quality, excellence and innovation one coffee shop at a time.

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It's no secret that Seattle loves dogs. With more dogs than children and fourteen off-leash dog parks, being a canine in the Emerald City is a pretty good gig. But while off-leash dog parks are a great service, not all dogs are friendly. There have been numerous cases in Seattle dog parks where pups have been dominated, bitten or in the worst case scenarios even killed by other aggressive dogs. These experiences have caused some in-city pet owners to steer clear of the off-leash park options. Sniffspot hopes to be the answer to this problem while also giving dog-loving property owners a way to make passive income. Join Tyler as he sits down with David Adams, Founder and CEO of Sniffspot to discuss how he wants Seattle to be the Airbnb for dogs. 

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Cathedral, is an event space in Ballard that donates 100% of their profit to charity. Their belief, is that we all see the problems of our world and have a desire to help, but often don't know where to start.

They plan to change that by empowering Seattleites to host an event in their historic Ballard location. Once the event is over and expenses are paid, the remaining profits go directly to a charity of the hosts choice.

But giving away your business's profits doesn’t come without it challenges. Especially in Seattle. Join Tyler and Nate as they discuss how Seattle parties for good.

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In 1995, after a disheartening Pee Wee football experience, undersized fifth-grader Ben Malcolmson solemnly vowed never to step onto a football field again. And no one was more shocked than Ben, 11 years later, to find his name on a list of football players added to the #1 ranked USC Trojan football team after their spring walk-on tryouts. 

In 2010, Malcolmson was asked to move to Seattle with Head Coach, Pete Carroll, to be his Special Assistant. Ben has been with the Hawks ever since. 

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Tim Goggin is a leading authority on digital transformation and advancing technology change in today’s established companies. He is the CEO of Sappington and founder of the Pacific Northwest Digital Business Hub, a consortium of top brands in the region focused on setting the direction for the future of business. He began his technology career at IBM and has spent decades advising major brands here in Seattle like Amazon, Microsoft, Starbucks and Nordstrom.

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On this episode, Phil talks about his decision to leave Rise Seattle and pursue his new vlog endeavor "Selling Seattle". Tyler shares his honest feelings about Phil leaving and questions the move. Join us for one final episode between the two co-hosts and celebrate what they've accomplished and what's to come for the future of Rise Seattle. 

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In 2014, Seattle City Council voted to incrementally raise the minimum wage from $9.32 to $15 per hour. Puget Sound Sage, a community driven policy think and do tank, was the policy engine behind that decision. For eleven years their team has been on the forefront of some of Seattle's most controversial policy decisions. Join Phil and Tyler's discussion with PSS Deputy Director, Kim Powe on Seattle affordability, systematic racial inequality and strategic tips on how we as Seattleites can progress towards a more equitable city for all. 

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This week, we sit down with Monica Guzman, the founder and director of the Evergrey. A leading digital news publication that helps Seattleites make the most of their city. On this episode you’ll hear how Guzman started the Evergrey and what she hopes it accomplishes for residents of Seattle. We also discuss her thoughts on Seattle’s current affordability issues, and her views on the idea of “good” journalism in today’s political climate.

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This week we hear how Kevin Sur and his company, Artist Home, started the Timber! Outdoor Music Festival and what attendees can expect from the weekend’s festivities. We also learn Sur’s advice for music lovers who want to support local artists and his fear for the music scene in Seattle amidst the city’s recent boom and the nation’s economic hardships.

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While we tend to think of Seattle as an inclusive and diverse city, the data shows that we still have a lot of work to do. With the growing gap of affordability, progressive Seattle workplaces are partnering with companies like Diverse City LLC to ensure they continue to pull the best talent from all demographics. Join us for an inspiring and challenging conversation with Cheryl Ingram, PhD and CEO of Diverse City, LLC.

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On this episode, Tyler and Phil sit down with technology guru and YouTube star, Chris Pirillo to discuss what led him to the Seattle area and how he started his current business. They also discuss Pirillo’s thoughts on how technology has impacted Seattle and what may be on the horizon.

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In 2016, we interviewed Jill Killen, owner of three beloved Seattle coffee shops. El Diablo, Cloud City and Royal Drummer. In April of this year, El Diablo received a notice demanding their exit of the premises by April 30th, 2018. 

This came as a tremendous shock to Jill and her team, as they are current on their rent, have never missed a lease payment during the course of their agreement, and continue investing in the space to improve the overall experience of El Diablo customers and staff.

In an effort to ensure El Diablo Coffee Co. staff can continue working during the upcoming move, maintaining their income, while at the same time needing a boost in funds to cover the unexpected costs of transporting our business infrastructure, community members have banned together to help Jill and her team in their time of need. 

Please join us in helping our dear friend, Jill Killen and her wife Jenn Steff to support their pursuit to keep El Diablo as a part of the Queen Anne community. 

Donate a few dollars to their GoFundMe Page Here.

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This week we sit down with Roger Valdez, the Director of Seattle for Growth, a partnership advocating for creating more housing of all types, in all neighborhoods, for all levels of income. He is a self-proclaimed lobbyist for developers and evangelist for growth and free-market economics. In this episode we discuss Valdez's “slice the pie thinner” vs. “bake more pies” analogy and how Seattle’s citizens must learn how to balance their morals with their own self-interests.

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On this episode, Tyler and Phil sit down with Seattle resident and Exstreamist.com founder Rob Toledo to discuss how streaming is changing the landscape of entertainment for cable companies, content providers, and customers. We also chat Toledo's favorite watering holes in Seattle’s Wedgwood neighborhood and how he managed to turn binge-watching Netflix into a career.

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On this episode, Tyler and Phil sit down with Brennon Staley, who is the Strategic Advisor on Urban Planning and Policy for Seattle’s Office of Planning and Community Development. Staley shares how he first came to Seattle and what his job as a strategic advisor entails. He also answers some of the locals’ most burning questions, including what systems are in place to address the growing need for parking and housing affordability in the city. 

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On this episode, Tyler and Phil sit down with Fred Moody a retired journalist, author, and part-time bartender at the local North Star Diner & Shanghai Room (featured on Anthony Bourdain’s show, Part’s Unknown). Moody has been featured in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal and has authored four books. You can read his book, Seattle and the Demons of Ambition, a dramatic, entertaining, and insightful portrait of the city that defined economic and technological change in the America of the 1990s.

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In this episode we dug into the archives for one of our favorite episodes with 2016 Washington State Teacher of the Year, Nathan Bowling. In 2016, Nate met with President Barak Obama; lectured at Harvard and taught Bill Gates about Civil Rights and Star Wars. Since then, he's gone on to speak all over the country about education, segregation, racial tensions a police brutality. While this episode was recorded in 2016 the message couldn't be more relevant to our society today. 

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On this episode, we turn the mic around and Tyler interviews Phil and Emilie McFarlane about their collaborative effort to create the Seattle School Guide. McFarlane shares tips for parents when it comes to communicating to school staff and her hopes and concerns for Seattle going forward. We also discuss her thoughts and feelings on living in Seattle and Shoreline, especially when it comes to having a large family with multiple kids. 

 

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On this episode of the Rise Seattle podcast, Tyler and Phil sit down with Gabriel Scheer, the director of strategic development for LimeBike, to discuss the recent influx of bike-share systems in Seattle and what that means for the future of the city. Scheer shares his knowledge of the origin of the bike-share trend, including where other companies have failed and how LimeBike changes the game. He also discusses the push-back LimeBike has received from the locals, the positive effects he has seen and hopes to see in the future, and how the introduction of LimeBike and other bike-share systems has opened the door to a much-needed discussion about transportation and the eventual need for shifting expectations and paradigms in Seattle.

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On this episode of the Rise Seattle podcast, Tyler and Phil sit down with former long-snapper for the Seattle Seahawks, Clint Gresham, to discuss his time in the NFL and what it has taught him about life. He shares his experience as a player in the Super Bowl and breaks down a very common, yet dangerous mentality that the NFL spreads to its employees. Gresham also discusses how the tutelage of his former coach, Pete Carroll, has influenced his personal philosophy, changed his views of God, and led to the creation of his book, Becoming: Loving the Process to Wholeness.

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If you’ve ever wanted to know what not to do while traveling, Geraldine DeRuiter is your top resource. On this episode of the Rise Seattle podcast, Tyler and Phil sit down with DeRuiter to discuss the creation of her award-winning travel blog, the Everywhereist, as well as her process in transitioning from blog writing to book writing. DeRuiter also shares a glimpse of her oddball sense of humor as she relays her experience with being diagnosed with a brain tumor back in 2012 and declares her stance on the political issues that are occurring in our country today.

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Do you have a dream to one day write a book? On this episode, Tyler and Phil sit down with Seattle Author, Andrea Dunlop to discuss her journey from working at a NYC publishing firm to becoming professional author here in Seattle. Dunlop shares her insights in the areas of marketing and self-publishing vs. traditional publishing. We also discuss her writing process and routine, as well as what makes Seattle’s writing scene different from other major cities.

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In this episode Tyler and Phil sit down with musician and podcaster Matt Carter to discuss the “Bad Christian” podcast and his opinions on Seattle’s Christian scene following the infamous Mars Hill movement. We also hit on his now decade long career as the lead guitarist in the band, Emery.  They also discuss how Carter handles being self-employed in the fastest growing city in the US.

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On this episode, Tyler and Phil hear Laurie Frankel’s perspective on being an author in Seattle, including her feelings about the general writing process and her thoughts on Seattle’s writing community in particular. They also discuss Frankel’s experience as a parent to a transgender daughter, her opinion on the recent transgender bathroom bill legislation, and her advice on navigating the transgender world (both as a person and a parent). They wrap up with Frankel’s hopes and concerns for the future of Seattle, and how you can win a copy of her newest book, This is How it Always Is.

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Tyler and Phil discuss the current and future Seattle real estate market as well as share a few fun stories from the field.  

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We're back! Season 2 kickoff!  Local tech founder, Rand Fishkin of Moz goes deep on the struggles of starting a company; what venture capitalists REALLY want to see and his personal struggle with depression.  If you live in Seattle, you must hear from this super smart and super awesome man who describes himself as a feminist.  Did you just attend MozCon? Hear more about what makes your favorite SEO wizard tick. 

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Tyler and Phil are back with a brand new season of Seattle stories and a few surprises as well! This season will periodically have mini episodes discussing local Seattle real estate, business and political news. This episode is the first of many. Enjoy! 

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In this season finale episode of “Rise Seattle” podcast, Phil and Tyler recap eight of thier favorite moments from episodes throughout the first season. From stories of survival to new perspectives on issues affecting Seattleites, each of these interviews encapsulate Rise Seattle's mission and show the true depth of the ways people contribute to the community everyday. 

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Nate is a Seattle transplant and digital marketing guru who cares deeply about his community of North Seattle. By day Nate works as the Customer Success team lead at Socedo a marketing technology company in Seattle and by night he’s the owner and Blogger of ournorthseattle.com a North Seattle community blog that has blown up in popularity, by focusing on infrastructure issues, local politics and economic trends affecting North Seattle. In this episode, we discuss the Seattle tech marketing scene, North Seattle hacker commutes and how Nate’s community blog ournorthseattle.com is activating North Seattleites to engage in local issues.

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Jeff Shulman is an Associate Professor at the University of Washington’s Foster School of Business, and the host of the “Seattle Growth” podcast. On this episode, Tyler and Phil sit down with Jeff to discuss the lessons he's learned exploring the tension between pro growth developers and Seattleites resistant to change. We also talk about how local podcasting brings people together and whether the Seattle Supersonics will ever come back to Seattle. 

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WIth the recent executive orders from President Trump regarding the travel ban and sanctuary cities, our nation is in the middle of a polarized debate. Many Seattle residents are asking themselves how this affects our city. Who better to provide clarity on what’s at stake than former Mayor Mike McGinn. 

Join us as, Mayor McGinn shares his thoughts on the new presidential orders, what you as a resident of Seattle can do to impact your community and how citizens of our city and our nation can unify despite our differences. We also couldn’t help but ask him about the possibility of a Seattle NBA team.

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Kelly Dole is the co-owner of Growler Guys in NE Seattle.  Living in Maple Leaf for 22 years, Kelly has a passion to offer high quality craft beer and food to NE Seattleites. The Growler Guys building is in the old Ying’s Drive-in on LCW, which was designed by legendary Seattle architect, Roland Terry. n this episode Kelly shares his story of opening an already beloved Seattle business, where he got the huge tree trunk that sits out front and of course his favorite beers. 

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Nathan Gibbs-Bowling is the 2016 Washington State Teacher of the Year.  In the last year, he’s met President Barak Obama; lectured at Harvard University and taught Bill Gates about Civil Rights and Star Wars. In this episode, we discuss with Nate how Seattleites can create a better future for our kid's education. 

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When it comes to Seattle homelessness, most people want to help in some way but don't know where to start.  Do we give a few dollars?  Do we not?  And if we do, where is the money being spent?  One tech entrepreneur in Pioneer Square believes that technology can fix this dilemma we all face.

Join Tyler and Phil's conversation with Jonathan Kumar, founder of GiveSafe.  A smartphone app designed to bridge the giving gap between people living on the streets and those who want to pass along a few dollars when asked.

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Since the market crash of 2008, Seattle has rebounded in a major way.  Rental rates and home values have rocketed to all time highs. And those who want to live in the city of Seattle are definitely feeling the pressure. Finding affordable housing in the city is a big challenge and we are seeing a trend of moving outside the city.  One popular destination is Tacoma, WA. On this episode Marguerite Giguere discusses how people are opting out of Seattle and moving to Tacoma. 

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In 2002 Jill Killen saw a need for a family-friendly, community space in the northeast Seattle neighborhood of Maple Leaf. Armed with a passion to provide quality food and coffee, Jill opened the beloved Cloud City Coffee on Roosevelt and 88th. Since it’s inception, Cloud City has evolved into the “town hall of Maple Leaf” with a following of regular customers who make each day feel like home. Since then Jill purchased El Diablo on Queen Anne and recently started Royal Drummer in Ballard. While her menus have expanded, and the coffee program has evolved, the mission and spirit to provide a place for Seattle to call home remains the same. Join our coffee conversation with Jill Killen as we discuss the Seattle coffee scene, her favorite at home coffee drinks and what it’s like to run three beloved coffee shops in the city of coffee.  

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Jeff Lilley is the President of Seattle’s Union Gospel Mission. UGM has been providing emergency care and long term recovery services to hurting and homeless people in the greater Seattle area for over 80 years. In this episode we talk to Jeff about his journey to becoming the CEO of UGM, UGM's work towards clearing the homeless encampment underneath I5 known as "the Jungle" and the homeless camper’s rights vote currently before Seattle city council.

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Suzie Burke has been given the title "Land Baroness of Fremont", as she owns over half of Fremont’s industrial commercial space. It’s because of her work that Fremont boasts some of the most powerful businesses in existence. Businesses like Google, Brooks, Adobe and Tableau just to name a few. 

The Seattle skyline has changed dramatically in the last decade. In this interview we’ll meet a big hearted, energetic, passionate and sometimes a bit pushy woman tell the story of how she single handedly changed the landscape in Fremont into the center of the universe. Acquiring this much land in Seattle doesn’t come without its challenges. Here Suzie unapologetically tells stories of her battles with competitors and Seattle governing authorities. 

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In 2012, Seattle native Sarah Adler created the company Simply Real Health with a mission to help more people live a healthy daily lifestyle. Through her programs and services, Sarah teaches a simple approach to a healthy life.  In this episode, Sarah shares a few simple tips on how to eat healthy, her favorite recipes and how to make a healthy cocktail. We also discuss the Seattle health food scene, and so much more! 

 

 

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In many ways Seattle is experiencing unprecedented prosperity. But in the dark corners of the city a tragic epidemic rages that no one wants to discuss and that is sex trafficking. According to the Department of Justice Seattle is considered one of the worst cities in the U.S for sex trafficking. While Washington led the nation to criminalize human trafficking it remains a hot bed for the trade.

A local organization, REST (Real Escape From the Sex Trade) was founded in 2009 to offer freedom, safety and hope for victims of sex trafficking and those involved in the trade.  Join us as we sit down with REST Director of Development, Edward Sumner to learn more about what REST is doing to contribute towards the solution.

We at Rise Seattle, envision a community that is free from commercial sexual exploitation. Listen, to the podcast, learn about the problem and join our partnership with REST as they strive to provide pathways of freedom, safety and hope for victims of sex trafficking and people involved in the sex trade.

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Bryan Papé is not your average entrepreneur. In 2006 a life threatening skiing accident helped inspire him to marry his sweet heart and start MiiR, a Seattle based Product to Project Company that focuses on creating high quality, well-designed water bottles, bikes and bags that fund water, transportation and education projects all over the world.  

Since MiiR’s inception in 2009, Bryan’s team has funded 55 water projects, given away 4,500 bikes and built one school. And he’s just getting started.  Join us as we get front row seats to watching this Seattle Company become one of the most respected and profitable global brands for good.   

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Julie Lewis is the founder of the 30/30 Project, a partnership between Julie, Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, and Construction for Change to build healthcare facilities across the globe. She is the recipient of the 2015 Nelson Mandela Changemaker Award, a mother, grandmother and local Seattleite. In this episode, we hear Julie's story of what it was like to be diagnosed with HIV, the way in which her and her family fought against the disease, and how she's using her story to give back to those in need. BONUS: We also hear a few personal stories of what it was like raise a young Ryan Lewis. 

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Seattle, Seafair & Rock'n'-Roll

After nearly 60 years as a disc jockey, radio station manager and concert promoter, Pat O’Day has cemented his legacy in the entertainment industry in Seattle and abroad.  In this episode, we hear Pat's stories of a young Jimi Hendrix; Elvis’ love of White Castle burgers and Led Zepellin continually trashing the Edgewater Hotel.  We also discuss one of Seattle’s long-standing traditions: Seafair. 

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