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Venture Stories on Smash Notes

Venture Stories podcast.

December 28, 2019

Venture Stories by Village Global takes you inside the world of venture capital and technology, featuring enlightening interviews with entrepreneurs, investors and tech industry leaders. The podcast is hosted by Village Global partner and co-founder Erik Torenberg and produced by Brett Bolkowy. Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast for more.



Episodes with Smash Notes

Katherine Boyle (@KTmBoyle), investor at General Catalyst, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Katherine’s piece in the Washington Post about religion and how software can help transform it.

- Polarization in society, politics, news, and the end of the fairness doctrine.

- Journalists as free agents and why she says subscription will be the future of good journalism.

- Why any institution that has existed for a long time is being questioned now.

- Whether there will be increasing uniformity of political views within companies.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Dhruv Jain and Kent Bennett (@kentbennett) of Bessemer join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Why B2B marketplaces version 1.0 didn’t work and how version 2.0 can succeed.

- How to make a vertical marketplace work.

- Shifts happening in industries that are using older technologies to transact.

- Specific sub-sectors they are looking to invest in and which they find most interesting.

- How they analyze different verticals and the key dimensions they look at.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Sean Linehan (@seanlinehan), co-founder and CEO of Placement, joins Erik on this episode. It was recorded as part of an OnDeck Fellowship event.

They discuss:

- How he navigated the idea maze after leaving Flexport before founding Placement.

- How to know when the time is right for your idea.

- Early experimentation with an idea and why you need customers, employees, and investors to all be excited about it.

- How to find the right co-founder.

- His advice on hiring at the earliest stages.

- His philosophy on compensation for early hires, including how to think about equity.

- How to think about competition, product-market fit, and moats.

- How the labor market is changing.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Charles Hudson, founder of Precursor, joins Erik on this episode. It was recorded live as part of an OnDeck Fellowship event.

They discuss:

- How he decides what to invest in.

- Why he says that he is often “looking for good ideas that initially look like bad ideas.”

- Why he has “an allergy to top-down market assessments.”

- How entrepreneurs should think about margins.

- Advice for founders working in frontier tech.

- Whether he invests based on the entrepreneur or on the idea.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Landon Brand of Wren (@project_wren) and Dani Grant (@thedanigrant) of USV, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Dani’s deep dive on the climate crisis and which solutions might be able to help.

- Requests for startups in the space and where they would be investing if they were running a fund focused on climate change.

- Why cleantech is worth investing in now after the bust in the late 2000s.

- Opportunities for investment in different types of power producers.

- How Wren can become a billion dollar company.

- How carbon-consciousness is spreading throughout businesses and society.

- The role of government and the key disagreements about the direction to take to address climate change.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Ramez Naam (@ramez), author of the Nexus series, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The arc of his career and what drove him to work on what he did.

- Why clean energy didn’t realize its potential in the 2000s and why now is a good time to invest in clean energy.

- His market map of opportunities in clean energy and the impact on the space that Moore’s Law is having.

- The influence of Kevin Kelly and Robert Wright on his thinking.

- The future of globalization.

- How to reconcile egalitarianism and meritocracy.

- The state of climate change.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Yancey Strickler (@ystrickler), co-founder of Kickstarter and author of This Could Be Our Future: A Manifesto for a More Generous World, joins Erik on this episode.

The discuss:

- His experience working on Kickstarter and what he realized about the power of the profit motive in an early-stage company.

- His vision of the world if the ideas from his book become widespread.

- The possibilities for co-op arrangements online and how to organize to ensure that people creating value for a network are the ones capturing that value.

- Why he’s a believer in tech and why he hopes that the power of tech can be used to deliver critical goods rather than to serve ads.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Jeff Morris Jr., founder of Chapter One, and Henry McNamara (@henrylmcnamara) of Great Oaks VC join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The reasons for the change in the D2C market and why companies that were part of “D2C 1.0” would have a hard time scaling today.

- Which spaces they’re excited about and where they’ve been investing.

- Trends and possibilities in consumer social.

- Industries where they see opportunities, including in CBD and consumer fintech.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Mike Rudoy (@mrudoy) and Luke Cohler (@ljcohler) of Jetty join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The story of founding Jetty and how they got to where they are today.

- The problems around rent affordability in the US and how they’re solving those issues.

- The evolution of insurance over the last two decades and what enabled the changes.

- Where they would be investing if they were running a fund focused on the space.

- How they think about the market and the most appropriate business model differently from other companies.

- How insurance will have changed in 5-10 years from now.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Fareed Mosavat (@far33d), EIR at Reforge and former director of product at Slack, and Jeff Chang (@jeffchang30), growth engineering lead at Pinterest and angel investor, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What’s changed in growth over the last several years.

- How to think about product-market fit and when to start investing in growth.

- Which metrics to pay attention to and which to ignore.

- How to think about payback periods, LTV, and CAC.

- How founders should think about acquisition channels.

- Common misconceptions that founders have about growth.

- How to think about SEO and referrals.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Darcy Doyle, SVP of Enterprise Sales at Carta and formerly of Box, joins Erik and co-host Yasmin Razavi, GP at Spark Capital. They discuss:

- How they found their first customers at Box and the sales process in the early days.

- How to find the right composition for your sales team and how it changes as a company grows.

- How they built their bottom-up sales motion.

- How to think about compensation models for sales reps.

- How to think about planning for hiring in the context of different revenue targets.

- Common dos or don’ts for growing sales teams.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Peter Kazanjy (@Kazanjy), co-founder of Atrium and author of Founding Sales, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The difference between selling to SMBs versus large organizations.

- How founders should think about sales as their company grows and evolves.

- Common mistakes that people make when growing their sales organization.

- What differentiates companies who scale sales successfully versus those who don’t.

- How to think about pricing models.

- How to measure the effectiveness of your sales team.

- How to think about compensation for salespeople.

- The best resources he recommends for learning about sales.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

David Eckstein (@davidneckstein), CFO of Menlo Security, joins Erik and co-host Yasmin Razavi (@yasminrazavi), GP at Spark Capital, on this episode.

They discuss:

- How their sales team works at Menlo Security and why their funnel is 50% marketing and 50% sales.

- How to get to a large sales team capable of selling to enterprise clients from a small early-stage team.

- Common mistakes he sees CEOs making as they try to scale their sales team.

- How to think about expanding internationally.

- How they measure how productive a rep is.

- How to think about compensation models for salespeople.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Arthur Johnson (@98arthurj), VP at Pure Storage and formerly of Twilio, joins Erik and co-host Yasmin Razavi (@yasminrazavi), GP at Spark Capital.

They discuss:

- Twilio’s origins as a company for developers by developers and the grassroots efforts they had to spread the world about the company.

- Building a team of developer evangelists and why they initially ignored the mainstream tech press in favor of outlets preferred by developers.

- How they got to half a billion in ARR and shifting to an enterprise go-to-market.

- The “hunter and farmer” model that they had for their sales team and what that enabled them to do.

- The evolution of the company into other areas and why the skeptics have been proven wrong.

- What he’s seeing change in the field during the pandemic and how it has impacted the sales motion across companies.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Chris Best (@cjgbest), co-founder and CEO of Substack, joins Erik on this episode. They discuss:

- How the idea for Substack came about and the early days of the company.

- How the internet has impacted media and journalism.

- How the world changes if Substack is successful.

- How they are enabling journalists to “go independent.”

- The implications of the subscription model.

- What’s been most popular on Substack and what has surprised him.

- How they are thinking about aggregation and distribution.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Annie Kadavy (@akad), of Redpoint, and Meera Clark (@itsmeeraclark), of Obvious Ventures, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The trends behind increasing loneliness and the decline of religion.

- Where they’re looking to invest.

- Why they’re interested in the mental health space.

- Why we should have more new social apps by now.

- Investing possibilities in online dating.

- How all of this changes in a post-COVID world.

The final deadline for applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Mike Duboe (@mduboe) of Greylock, Dan Hockenmaier (@danhockenmaier) of Basis One, and Dave Weinstein, also of Basis One, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The impacts of the pandemic on businesses and what will be lasting versus temporary.

- What makes food marketplaces an exciting investment in these times.

- Why there will be a shift away from using data and experimentation in growth teams.

- How to evaluate monetization and a re-thinking of how it interacts with growth.

- The impact of the pandemic on hiring.

- Opportunities in customer acquisition and marketing due to COVID-19.

The final deadline for applications to our Network Catalyst accelerator is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Jesse Walden (@jessewldn), formerly of a16z and founder of Variant Fund, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How he got into crypto.

- What has changed in the space since Bitcoin came out.

- What it means to be an “innovation maximalist.”

- Why he’s excited about co-ops.

- How crypto impacts ISAs and the possibilities for equity to be used where debt currently is.

- What he means when he talks about “crypto-adjacent startups” and their impacts.

- How crypto might change VC.

The final application deadline for our Network Catalyst accelerator is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Chris Hutchins (@hutchins) of Wealthfront joins Erik to talk about:

- How he became a “huge personal finance nerd.” He tells the story of ordering Domino’s in college and selling it by the slice to earn extra money.

- The history of creating Grove and why Wealthfront was a great fit for them.

- How software is democratizing access to wealth management.

- Passive versus active investing in the time of COVID-19.

- His requests for startups in fintech and where he’s excited in the space.

- What personal finance will look like when their vision of “self-driving money” is achieved.

The final deadline for applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Mike Maples (@m2jr), co-founder and partner at Floodgate, joins Erik to talk about:

- Insight hacking as a scientific way to generate insights, including specific steps to take and how to “backcast.”

- The types of inflections that create potentially huge companies.

- How to systematically find those inflections.

- Lessons from founders who have successfully created companies built on inflections.

- Frameworks for thinking through whether a worthwhile company can emerge from a chosen inflection.

- How to lead effectively in the earliest stages through the growth phase.

- Why he says “you don’t want to be the best, you want to be the only.”

- His advice on pitching.

The final deadline for applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

This episode with Balaji Srinivasan (@balajis) was recorded as part of an OnDeck fellowship session.

They discuss:

- The concept of ikigai and how it can help you plan your next career move.

- How to think about when to leave or join a company, and when to start something of your own.

- How Balaji generates and validates ideas.

- Finding a co-founder and the most important issues to work out before starting a company with them.

- The impacts of COVID-19 on different markets.

The final deadline for applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Dan McMurtrie (@SuperMugatu) of Tyro Partners joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- His writing on the crisis, how he has analyzed it, and why his view has changed from bearish to bullish.

- The “bottom-up” recovery that’s taking place and all the ways that it might falter.

- What specifically he’s watching for that might change his opinion on the market.

- The impact on politics and society and why he says “it gets weird from here.”

- What Schrodinger’s put means and the implications for the stock market.

- Why he says this reveals the existential problems with the US economy and why he’s bearish on the US over the next twenty years.

The final deadline for applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Lee Edwards (@terronk) of Root Ventures joins Erik on this episode. They discuss:

- The story of how he became interested in the topic.

- His requests for startups in the space.

- The ISA model.

- Which companies he’s interested in in the space.

- Debt financing and possible alternatives.

- Whether it’s possible to build a practical and portfolio-based education in liberal arts.

- Why people remain cost insensitive when it comes to college.

- Whether government should direct more money to education and how that should break down between incumbents and upstarts.

The final deadline for applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. 

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Fred Destin (@fdestin), founder of Stride.VC, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What the ideal fund size is in Fred's opinion.

- His thoughts on diversification in venture.

- What his prediction for a possible bounce-back is and why he thinks this is more like '01-'03 than '08-'09.

- Why founders need to reset their mindset in the COVID-19 era.

- Whether there are too many entrepreneurs and if not, how to add more.

- His message for entrepreneurs in this time.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Byrne Hobart (@ByrneHobart), creator of The Diff (diff.substack.com), joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How have the past few months changed our understanding of institutions and our trust in them
- Is the current environment a win for modern monetary theorists?
- Is the current environment a win or loss for bitcoin maximalists that see the Fed as a huge liability?
- What should the Fed and Congress have done differently?
- Is the government running on autopilot?
- How do we make sense of what’s happening in the stock market?
- Is the stock market dominated by institutional or retail investor sentiment? How should we think about bailouts and stock buybacks?
- Future of Journalism and thoughts on Citizen Journalism
- How will China’s brand evolve over time?
- Byrne’s thoughts on “It’s Time to Build”
- What’s happening with pensions and how do we make sense of it?
- Has COVID accelerated the decline of traditional universities?
- How do we think about the oil markets right now, especially during the asme time as COVID?
- What are the second order effects of COVID?
- Is the stock market pricing in a recession?

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Arnold Kling (@klingblog), economist and author, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What experts disagree on with respect to COVID-19.

- How Arnold would deal with the pandemic if he was in charge.

- What he would do about lockdowns.

- Where he agrees and disagrees with the government’s fiscal and monetary response to the crisis.

- The difficulty with models predicting cases.

- The effects of the pandemic on globalization, libertarianism, and progressivism.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Scott Sumner, research associate on monetary policy at the Mercatus Center, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What the US has done well and what it has not done well when it comes to fiscal and monetary policy.

- Why there has been a reversal of thinking on inflation between now and decades ago, and his thinking about dealing with inflation.

- Other tools that are available to influence the economy beyond interest rates.

- His thinking on modern monetary theory.

- The future of the economy with social distancing and high unemployment.

- The current debates within the Fed on monetary policy.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Ann-Miura Ko (@annimaniac), joins Erik on this episode. It was recorded as part of an On Deck Fellowship event.

They discuss:

- Her perspectives on what it was like to start a company in the last several downturns and why this one is different from the others.

- Why they are telling their portfolio companies that they need to be “outlasting, not outspending” their competitors.

- What a “minimal viable company” means and how to avoid “fake growth.”

- What will continue to be different when the pandemic is over.

- Which spaces she’s excited about.

- Her theory on the new social contract emerging between workers and employers.b

- How startups should think about competition.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Brad Menezes (@bradmenezes), Director of Product at Datadog, joins Erik and co-host Yasmin Razavi, GP at Spark Capital.

They discuss:

- How go-to-market and product reinforce each other.

- The different elements of a sales team and how they think about sales at Datadog.

- Why events and conferences are key parts of their sales strategy.

- Why their product managers are important pieces of their sales team.

- Why it’s a mistake to ignore your competitors.

- How they think about creating new products.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

John Danner (@jwdanner) of Dunce Capital and Michael Staton (@mpstaton) of Learn Capital join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How EdTech has evolved and the ways that perspectives have changed on the space.

- Their theses about the future of the space and the key challenges that it faces.

- Why the pandemic might be the catalyst for an increase in homeschooling.

- The problems with the current ways that education is delivered and how certain companies are well-positioned to change things for the better.

- Whether there will be an expansion of ISAs to different, more regulated, verticals.

- The challenges that for-profit companies face in education.

- Whether there will be such a thing as a “Walmart University” or “Amazon University.”

- Their requests for startups in the space.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Austen Allred (@austen), CEO of Lambda School, and Rishi Mandal (@rmandal), founder of Future, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How Austen took education that typically happened in person and transformed it into digital form at Lambda School.

- How Rishi is taking fitness training that happened in person and transforming it into digital form with Future.

- What Austen calls the “skeuomorphic” way of translating experiences into digital form and why it doesn’t work.

- How they ensure motivation and accountability on each of their platforms.

- Why relationships with a coach or a teacher are so special and how they can be cultivated digitally.

- How to think about community-building in a digital-only world.

- Why Austen says that it’s important to “compensate for weaknesses by doubling down on strengths.”

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Gabe Bassin (@gabebassin) and Taylor Pearson (@TaylorPearsonMe) join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The ins and outs of what each of the fed and treasury are doing at this time.

- The impacts of the pandemic on credit markets and pension systems.

- The disruptions to the demand side and the effects of possible supply-side disruptions.

- How the pandemic exacerbates inequality.

- The impact on Bitcoin and what this says about Austrian economics.

- Whether there’s a bubble in passive investing and the S&P 500 as a savings account.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Conor White-Sullivan (@Conaw), founder of Roam Research, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What they're working on at Roam and what will be different about the world if they achieves their dreams with the company.

- The different ways of representing the structure of thought and how tools impact thoughts themselves.

- How Roam relates to and is different from Twitter, GitHub, Notion, Quora, and others.

- What it means when he says he wants the product to have a “low floor and a high ceiling” like Excel.

- Some of the current debates in knowledge management and his thoughts on them.

- His requests for tools in the space.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Samir Kaji (@SamirKaji), managing director at First Republic Bank, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The state of the financial world before COVID and the cracks that Samir saw in the system last year.

- Why this shock is like a “train going 150 miles per hour hitting a brick wall.”

- What venture funds should do in this environment.

- Whether there’s hope for a recovery in the near future, or not — and why this is different than any other previous recession.

- How the behavior of LPs will change and what they will require of fund managers.

- Why he’s been bullish on smaller funds.

- The future of venture and whether there are truly disruptive alternatives to today’s system.

- Why he thinks that the financial world might come out of this in a better place than before.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Jesse Genet (@jessegenet) and Stephan Ango (@kepano), co-founders of Lumi, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How Lumi works, and how the company changes how a DTC brand does business.

- How community influences the success of DTC brands.

- Which areas within DTC are VC-fundable.

- Where they would be investing if they were running a fund focused on the space.

- What will happen with some of the more obscure consumer products that are sold, and whether they will be sold DTC eventually.

- Who the losers might be among entrenched players.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Andreas Klinger (@andreasklinger), head of remote at AngelList and creator of Remote First Capital, joins Erik on this episode. This was recorded as part of an OnDeck session.

They discuss:

- The impact of COVID-19 on remote work and why he says it’s really a “double-edged sword” when it comes to the spread of remote working in the future.

- Whether remote can work for early-stage companies.

- Which types of companies are most suited to remote work.

- What he learned from hiring engineers for Product Hunt five years ago, and what has changed since then.

- Why he says that “most productivity problems have more to do with you than with your team.”

- How to think about comp for remote workers.

- How to be a good interviewer for remote jobs.

- His requests for startups.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Sheel Mohnot (@pitdesi) of Better Tomorrow and Jayni Shah (@shahjayni) of Accomplice join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The state of fintech pre-COVID and the high level of activity in the space over the last several years.

- Their thoughts on challenger banks and why they will have a hard time in this environment.

- Which consumer habits will change permanently after the pandemic is over and which companies are best poised to capitalize on those shifts.

- The impact of COVID on SMBs and the startups working with them.

- The trends in fundraising that they’ve seen since the start of the pandemic and the advice they’re giving to founders.

- The impacts on lending, roboadvisors, life insurance, real estate, and more.

- The unique dynamics of fintech in India.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Kristin Baker Spohn (@kbakes) of CRV and Deena Shakir (@deenashakir) of Lux Capital join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What Kristin has noticed about the space after moving from operator to investor.

- How COVID has rapidly accelerated digital health adoption.

- Which spaces and companies they’re more interested in in a post-COVID world.

- Advice for founders trying to sell to large organizations and employers.

- The difference between companies focused on prevention versus treatment.

- The status of data in healthcare and whether it can be a differentiator.

- Other spaces in healthcare that they’re interested in.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Ali Hamed (@AliBHamed), investor at CoVenture, and Brent Beshore (@BrentBeshore), founder and CEO of Permanent Equity, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Their advice for venture firms and companies trying to fundraise in this environment.

- How LPs will change their capital allocations in a post-COVID world.

- Whether it’s a good time to be investing right now or not.

- How this time is different from the 2008 financial crisis.

- How they’re spending their time.

- What will go back to normal in time, and what might not.

- Which spaces will change or accelerate, and where they’re looking at investing.

- The government programs available for startups, and whether startups should be taking advantage of them.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Nir Eyal (@nireyal), bestselling author of "Hooked" and "Indistractable", joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The psychology behind distraction and discomfort

- The role of willpower and forethought in productivity

- Is willpower a limited resource?

- Why to-do lists backfire

- Becoming indistractable

- Raising indistractable children and forging indistractable relationships

- How you can use technology to prevent technology distraction

- Why do children overuse technology?

- Have smart phones caused increases In teen suicides?

- Nir’s investments in the space

- What is the root of the tech backlash?

Check out Nir's new book "Indistractable"at http://nirandfar.com/Indistractable

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Village Global co-founder Erik Torenberg (@eriktorenberg) chatted with Jo Varshney (@jo_getter), founder and CEO of VeriSIM Life and Kiran Bellubbi (@smalldozes), founder of Keyo, about their experience with the Village Network Catalyst program.

Jo and Kiran explain what it was like to be a founder in Network Catalyst, including how the team at Village Global helped them with their business model, leveraged Village Global’s unique structure as a network to their advantage, and guided them through the fundraising process.

This is a rebroadcast of a live episode that was recorded at Village Global HQ in San Francisco on June 14 2018. The event was put on in partnership with Xoogler, a network of former Googlers who have come together to help each other with their startup ambitions.

Village Global’s Network Catalyst accelerator is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Matt Clifford (@matthewclifford) and Alice Bentinck (@alicebentinck), co-founders of Entrepreneur First, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What EF is all about and why Matt says that being an entrepreneur is one of the highest-leverage ways to change the world.

- How to do ideation well, and how they think about it differently from traditional VC firms.

- What they’ve learned about good founding teams and what makes a good co-founder match.

- The challenges around changing the culture around entrepreneurship.

- How they think about expansion and what their future will look like.

- How to encourage more people to become founders.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Akshay Kothari (@akothari), COO of Notion, and co-host Yasmin Razavi (@yasminrazavi), GP at Spark Capital, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How Akshay started working at Notion.

- The tools that people use for work and how they’ve evolved over time.

- Some of the cool things that people have created with Notion.

- The story of the genesis of Notion.

- What they are working on for the future of the product.

- How they are growing and thinking about scaling.

- Akshay’s advice for founders.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Karan Talati (@ktal90), Co-founder and CEO of First Resonance, and Keenan Johnson (@keenanjohnson), aerospace engineer, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The role of software versus processes in manufacturing innovation

- Why has manufacturing been so slow to innovate and why is now the right time to disrupt it?

- How platform shifts in hardware are changing the way we manufacture products

- The future of manufacturing

- Request for startups in the space

- The role of the public sector in manufacturing

- Are hardware startups compatible with venture funding?

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Andrew Wilkinson (@awilkinson) co-founder of Tiny, joins Erik and co-host David Booth (@david__booth), CEO of OnDeck, on this episode.

They discuss:

- His story of building businesses in high school and how he ended up as the head of a family of 25 different companies with over 400 employees.

- How they think about acquiring or investing in businesses and what they are looking for.

- Where they get their capital.

- How they think about founder liquidity and why they often invest in founders who want to leave the business.

- Where they’re looking to invest and what’s most interesting to them.

- Why they don’t want to be a venture studio.

- How they make sure they have alignment with their CEOs.

- Why private equity is suited to remote work.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Immad Akhund (@immad), founder and CEO of Mercury, and Jude Gomila (@judegomila), founder and CEO of Golden, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What’s top of mind for them with respect to COVID-19 and the response.

- Decentralized versus centralized approaches to the problem.

- Which underlying problems in American society this has brought to the surface.

- Which trends are going to accelerate because of the pandemic.

- Common mistakes that founders make when fundraising.

- Why it’s important to have balancing forces for certain attributes of the culture at your company.

- Thoughts on futarchy.

- What they disagree on.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Jesse Walden (@jessewldn), formerly of a16z and founder of Variant Fund, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How he got into crypto.

- What has changed in the space since Bitcoin came out.

- What it means to be an “innovation maximalist.”

- Why he’s excited about co-ops.

- How crypto impacts ISAs and the possibilities for equity to be used where debt currently is.

- What he means when he talks about “crypto-adjacent startups” and their impacts.

- How crypto might change VC.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Channing Ferrer, VP of Sales Operations and Strategy at HubSpot, joins Erik and co-host Yasmin Razavi of Spark Capital.

They discuss:

- The sales process and strategy at HubSpot.

- How to build a sales team at different stages in a company’s life, including who to hire and how to find the right candidates.

- How to determine quotas for new sales reps.

- What the right size is for different sales teams.

- The common mistakes that people make with respect to sales at different stages.

Applications for the summer vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are now open! The early decision deadline is May 15th and final deadline is June 5th. Learn more and apply today at www.villageglobal.vc/network-catalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Sahil Lavingia (@shl), founder and CEO of Gumroad, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The story of starting Gumroad, raising money, and getting featured in the media.

- Going from a twenty person company to a five person company to a single-person company.

- The advice he would give to a younger version of himself if he was starting over again.

- The creator economy and which types of content do well.

- How to think about raising capital.

- Time as a status symbol, the merits of cities, and what it means to “play poker with an open hand.”

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Gigi Levy-Weiss (@gigilevy) of NFX joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The history and evolution of gaming and why he’s excited about the space.

- His requests for startups in gaming and what gaming will look like in ten years.

- His thoughts on e-sports and why he’s excited about VR.

- Crypto, blockchain, and how those technologies interface with gaming.

- Why biotech will be transformative and how data and machine learning are enabling new discoveries.

- Common fundraising mistakes that founders make.

- What people misunderstand about product-market fit.

- Startup leadership and what makes a great leader and culture.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Andy Chen (@andychen), partner at Coatue, and Jose Guardado (https://www.linkedin.com/in/joseguardado/), founder of a new company, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How hiring has evolved over the last decade.

- Why startups are focusing on recruiting earlier, and hiring people dedicated to the task as some of their earliest employees.

- How to find a co-founder who will work well with you, and how to deal with disagreements between co-founders.

- The most common mistakes made when hiring.

- How to figure out how equity should be distributed between founders and early hires.

- How to source the best candidates at early-stage companies.

- Their best advice for doing reference checks.

- Startups in the talent and recruiting space and potential opportunities for founders.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

This episode was recorded in front of a live audience in January 2020 at Ayn Rand Con. Erik interviewed Jason Crawford and Yaron Brook.

Jason (@jasoncrawford) writes about the history of technology and industry at Roots of Progress.

Yaron (@yaronbrook) is host of The Yaron Brook Show.

They discuss:

- What can destroy — or save — Silicon Valley.

- What Rand would say about Silicon Valley if she could see it today.

- How to reconcile egalitarianism and meritocracy.

- How to make her ideas more mainstream.

- Objectivism, libertarianism, and individualism.

- Progress as a human achievement and how to appreciate it.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Rahul Vohra (@rahulvohra), founder and CEO of Superhuman, and Todd Goldberg (@toddg777), angel investor, join Erik on this episode. They’ve raised a $7M angel fund together called the Todd and Rahul Angel Fund.

They discuss:

- The nano fund trend, first-time fund operators, and their thinking on fund size.

- How they thought about their next ideas when getting ready to start their companies.

- The spaces they’re most excited about.

- What it means to build “prosumer software” and what Rahul learned from building Superhuman.

- The common mistakes founders make when thinking about product-market fit.

- How to think about raising — and spending — money.

- How to create product experiences that result in flow.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Nick Mehta (@nrmehta), CEO at Gainsight, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- SaaS sub-sectors that Nick is excited about

- Is Customer Success a skillset, function, a software stack?

- What are the most common misconceptions about customer success?

- When should a startup start thinking about the customer success function?

- How do you scale the customer success function?

- What’s the profile of a successful customer success manager?

- How has customer success evolved over the past decade and where is it going?

- Nick’s thoughts on the sales enablement space

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Andy Chen (@andychen), partner at Coatue, and Jose Guardado (https://www.linkedin.com/in/joseguardado/), founder of a new company, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How hiring has evolved over the last decade.

- Why startups are focusing on recruiting earlier, and hiring people dedicated to the task as some of their earliest employees.

- How to find a co-founder who will work well with you, and how to deal with disagreements between co-founders.

- The most common mistakes made when hiring.

- How to figure out how equity should be distributed between founders and early hires.

- How to source the best candidates at early-stage companies.

- Their best advice for doing reference checks.

- Startups in the talent and recruiting space and potential opportunities for founders.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Angela Tran (@angelatytran), GP at Version One, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How digital health is helping to empower consumers.

- The unbundling of healthcare.

- Her requests for startups in healthcare.

- The questions she asks when evaluating marketplace companies.

- Why she looks for marketplace companies that are creating new behaviours for consumers, rather than just unbundling them from their previous providers.

- Her thoughts on fitness, consumer social, and the Toronto Raptors.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Alex Bangash (@alexbangash), founder of Trusted Insight, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Why and how he wants to disrupt venture.

- How VC is changing and why later stage investing is becoming more private equity-like.

- Why he says common stock is the biggest driver of disruption in the industry now, and why it’s also the most misunderstood.

- The myth of being a great picker in venture.

- If and where data can provide an unfair advantage.

- Why he likes the platform model.

- What he thinks of the nano fund model.

- Trends on the LP side of things, including investing directly in companies.

- How crypto and crowdfunding might disrupt venture in the future.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Amit Mukherjee (@AmitMukherjee) of NEA and Kyle Doherty (@kydoh) of General Catalyst join Erik on this episode:

They discuss:

- How data is being used in private market investing, how it differs from the approaches used in public markets, and how it will evolve in the future.

- Crossover investing between public and private-oriented firms and why public investors are moving to earlier stages.

- The advantages and disadvantages of going public and whether in the future there will be companies that never go public.

- The importance of founder vs. team vs. market at the early stages versus the later stages.

- Whether VC firms will expand into other specialized practices like real estate, crypto, biotech, and others.

- Their predictions for how VC firms will evolve in the next ten years.

- Their lessons from investing in food companies.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Delian Asparouhov (@zebulgar), principal at Founders Fund, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Delian’s essays on what he’s learned from working with Keith Rabois at Founders Fund, and why he says “osmosis is the best way to learn.”

- How they evaluate talent in general, and specifically founders.

- Why he says that the more technical the company, the better the founder has to be at fundraising and storytelling.

- Why they are more excited about lending these days.

- Companies that help you improve your sleep with personalized solutions.

- What the “business equation” means for a company and Keith’s rules of thumb for figuring out whether it’s viable or not.

- What to look for when interviewing executives, and the difference between value-creating and value-protecting positions.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Ajay Agarwal (@ajay_bcv) and Kevin Zhang (@kevinzhang) of Bain Capital Ventures join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The history of enterprise software and how the way it has been sold has changed over time.

- How SaaS, cloud-based software and changing customer expectations have transformed enterprise software.

- The ways that investors are investing differently in software in a bottom-up world.

- The most interesting places where bottom-up software can go next.

- Why Ajay says that supply chain innovation has been and will be the key to long-term success.

- Some of their requests for startups in the space.

- Predictions for the next 5-10 years.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Byrne Hobart (@ByrneHobart), creator of The Diff (diff.substack.com), joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The fox/hedgehog dichotomy
- Is it better to be a specialist or generalist?
- Do institutions drift leftward over time?
- How will the culture war evolve over time?
- How are financial bubbles created?
- What we can learn from financial bubbles?
- The future of K-12 and higher education
- The future of identity and anonymity
- Why filter bubbles are good
- The future of journalism
- Why we’re polarized
- What should be the role of government and Wall Street?
- The value of social capital and how to think about it
- Are financial bubbles necessary
- The tyranny of the long generation

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Byrne Hobart (@ByrneHobart), creator of The Diff (diff.substack.com), joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The role of cost disease in healthcare, education, and construction
- The future of globalization
- Can bitcoin become a reserve asset
- Is Wall Street good for society
- How interest rates will change over the next 5-10 years and the role of negative interest rates
- Mental models for thinking about financial bubbles
- Betting on the future of Silicon Valley
- Reasons for the Tech Lash and how it will evolve over the next decade
- Future of the US-China relationship

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Joining Erik on this episode are:

- Dan Hockenmaier (@danhockenmaier), founder of Basis One

- Casey Winters (@onecaseman), Chief Product Officer at Eventbrite

- Lenny Rachitsky (@lennysan), former founder as well as former growth PM at Airbnb

They discuss:

- How marketplaces have evolved over the last several years.

- The trend towards owning more of a user’s experience, and the pros and cons of that approach.

- The possibilities for new vertical marketplaces.

- Where they would be investing if they were running a fund focused on the space.

- Why some of the biggest companies in the space were initially overlooked.

- How to think about building liquidity in a marketplace.

- Some of the interesting debates in the field, and their takes on them.

- The most surprising learnings they’ve had while working in the space.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Don Stalter (@westsides) of Global Founders Capital and Ryan Darnell (@ryan_darnell_) of Max Ventures join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Where are the opportunities in the ISA space and the new businesses ISAs will enable
- How ISAs will enable new forms of homeschooling
- The downsides of ISAs
- The evolution of Digital Health and where it’s going
- The evolution of digital commerce
- The potential in the Vertical SaaS space
- The future of U.S. and international innovation
- Long or short Silicon Valley

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Jerry Neumann (@ganeumann), founder of Neu Venture Capital, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Carlota Perez’s work and the implications for investors and founders, including what would change if VCs took her ideas seriously.

- What people misunderstand the most about moats.

- Why he wants to invest in situations where there is uncertainty, and what the right kind of uncertainty is.

- Whether you can predict what the next technological revolution will be, and why the predictions themselves end up shaping the future.

- Why he says that the power law distribution in venture is a result of the picking process.

- How he thinks about follow-on investments.

- Venture capital and poker.

- The reasons that the structure of venture funds hasn’t changed.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Daniel Gross (@danielgross) of Pioneer and Brett Berson (@brettberson) of First Round join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The different types of founders and the different companies they eventually end up building.

- Creating positive feedback loops for aspiring entrepreneurs.

- The psychology of founders, and why at the end of the day they are status and hierarchy maximizers, and why it’s important to find the right hierarchy to maximize within.

- The advice that you can’t truly appreciate until you experience it firsthand.

- The three most harmful structures that keep people from starting companies.

- The best interview questions.

- Why peculiar ways of running a company are celebrated early on, and whether companies succeed because of or in spite of those peculiarities in management.

- Structural changes that could increase the number of founders.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Andreas Klinger (@andreasklinger), founder of Remote First Capital, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What has led to the rise of remote work

- The recent acceptance of remote work by Silicon Valley VCs

- What companies can now be built because of remote work

- How private equity is driving the transition to remote work

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Andy Coravos (@AndreaCoravos), Nina Alli (@headinthebooth), and Beau Woods (@beauwoods) join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Software’s role in medical devices and our increasing dependence on it
- What is DEF CON and who attends
- How medical device manufacturers should be working with hackers
- What’s the relationship between regulators and security researchers
- The state of DIY biohacking
- The relationship between the FDA and startups
- What would the FDA look like if you could rebuild it from scratch

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Dan McMurtrie (@supermugatu), founder of Tyro Partners, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The similarities and differences between hedge funds and venture capital.

- Why “you’re usually competing against yourself” in liquid markets.

- His thoughts on the crypto gold rush in 2016-2017.

- What venture capitalists need to know about short-selling.

- His view of trends in healthcare, housing, and education, and the political implications of those trends.

- Why he’s deeply concerned about the 2024/2028 election cycle.

- How to evaluate management and how to think about leadership styles.

- How to think about risk management when investing.

- His writing on online dating and the future of relationships.

- His thoughts on comedy and why it’s such a powerful medium.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Ali Hamed (@AliBHamed) of CoVenture and Chris Keller of Moelis Asset Management join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What do LPs look for when investing in venture funds
- How will the LP and VC dynamic shift over time
- Concentration in LP portfolios
- The role of power law in venture capital
- Incentive misalignments for LPs
- How should VCs foster relationships with LPs
- Why hasn’t the VC model been innovated upon much in the past decade
- Will the middleman ever get cut out
- How the LP ecosystem will change in the next decade

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Sheel Mohnot (@pitdesi), fintech investor, and Jake Gibson (@iamjakestream), co-founder of NerdWallet and Better Tomorrow Ventures, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Why it’s still so hard to start a fintech company.

- The history of retailers moving into financial services, a trend that Sears started back in the day.

- How different categories within fintech have evolved over time and the challenges and opportunities inherent in each of them.

- Why financial education hasn’t worked, why it is likely not to work in the future, and the implications for building personal financial managers.

- Where the opportunities are in the insurance and re-insurance markets.

- Which of the big incumbent tech companies will have made the most progress in the financial space in the next five to ten years.

- Their requests for startups.

- How the space will look different in the next five years.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Rick Zullo (@Rick_Zullo), General Partner at Equal Ventures, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The different phases of technological revolutions

- Will incumbents become stronger in the next platform shift

- What Carlota Perez’s work means for the venture capital landscape

- Which categories will create the most successful startups in the next decade

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Anu Hariharan (@anuharharan), partner at Y Combinator, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Common mistakes that CEOs make when growing their companies.

- How to think about compensation plans in a growing startup.

- How to think about managing your board, including why you should get to know your board members as people, as well as when to listen to them or not.

- How founders should think about the possibility of a reckoning in the macro environment.

- Her talk on the nine different types of business models and how investors should think about them.

- Her unique take on network effects and the three laws that she learned from Marc Andreessen.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Will Houghteling (@willhoughteling), Founder & CEO at Strive, and Paul Freedman (@pmfreedm), Founder and CEO of Entangled Ventures, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Mental models for thinking about the higher education space
- The future of bootcamps and schools like Lambda
- What does the future of credentials look like
- What’s the role of government in higher education
- Where’s the whitespace in higher education
- Requests for education startups
- Navigating the idea maze for higher education startups
- How will innovation in K-12 happen

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Tyler Cowen (@tylercowen), economist and author, joins Jasmine Wang (@j_asminewang), technologist and philosopher, and Erik’s co-host for this episode.

They discuss:

- What Tyler has learned about identifying talent and why he thinks that IQ is overrated.

- The forces shaping education today and how Tyler would change it if he could.

- Whether leftism is “eating the world.”

- What will replace cyberpunk and the role of aesthetics in intellectual life.

- How to find the best people for government jobs.

- Why globalization has not led to more innovation.

- And finally, a rapid-fire round where Erik and Jasmine name a person and Tyler explains where they agree or disagree with each other.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Jonathan Hsu (@jonathanhsu), co-founder and general partner at Tribe Capital, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- His background in data science, how it has impacted (or not) venture, and how using data can help remove bias.

- Why so much of talent evaluation by venture capitalists is instinct-driven instead of data-driven.

- The common misconceptions that people have about product-market fit and how he thinks about it.

- How to pick the right metric when setting strategy for your startup, including common mistakes that people make in early-stage companies when thinking about metrics.

- How to evaluate pre-product-market-fit companies and where he stands on the lean startup vs. “fat startup” debate.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Beezer Clarkson (@beezer232) of Sapphire Ventures and Aydin Senkut (@asenkut) of Felicis Ventures join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Their perspectives on the operator-angel and nano-fund trends.

- How to think about scouts.

- Moats in venture capital and whether they really exist.

- Whether we need more venture capital or more venture capitalists.

- How the LP and GP ecosystems will evolve over the next five to ten years.

- How to figure out what the right fund size is for a firm.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Winter Mead (@wintmead), an LP formerly of Sapphire, and David Booth (@david__booth), co-founder and CEO of OnDeck, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Assessing fund managers from an LP perspective, and what it means to be “too diversified” in VC.

- Enabling the next generation of GPs.

- What it means to say that “venture capital is a human capital game.”

- The impact of the current market on LPs’ willingness to invest.

- Whether there will be an alternative to the ten year fund cycle.

- The consequences of power shifting to founders from VCs.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Alex MacCaw (@maccaw), founder and CEO of Clearbit, joins Erik on this episode. He is a co-author of the book The Great CEO Within.

They discuss:

- The power of good management and the lack of a modern handbook for managers.

- Why and how they treat interviewing and hiring as a science experiment.

- What to know for a great reference check.

- Managing conflict effectively.

- Why you only really close a hire after the first ninety days of them working at your company.

- How to think about compensation at a startup.

- How to give feedback and his breakdown of which kinds of words to use or not.

- How to think about building culture at a startup.

- Common management and meeting mistakes.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Sriram Krishnan (@sriramk), investor and former product lead at Twitter, Facebook, and Snap, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- His experiences working at the three big social media companies and what he learned there.

- Why each company is a reflection of the founder.

- What people misunderstand or under appreciate about each of them.

- Why he thinks that Facebook missed a golden opportunity when they decided not to build a web browser.

- What he thinks each of Twitter, Facebook, and Snap should do next.

- Some of his mental models for thinking about social media.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Spencer Bogart (@CremeDeLaCrypto) of Blockchain Capital and Brayton Williams (@BraytonKey) of Boost VC, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Their analysis of the different eras of crypto and how the thinking of the people involved in the space has evolved.

- Whether the crypto bubble in 2017 can be compared to the internet bubble of 1999.

- Unpacking the Bitcoin-as-programmable money thesis.

- Specific problems that crypto is solving that they have invested in, as well as their requests for startups.

- How crypto can disrupt VC.

- What might have changed in the crypto space when looking back from 5 years in the future.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Fabrice Grinda (@fabricegrinda), entrepreneur and angel investor, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What Fabrice believes about marketplaces and the trend towards verticalization that VCs don’t believe.

- How they evaluate investments and the four criteria that they use to determine whether they will invest or not.

- His breakdown of some of the failed marketplace startups.

- What you need to know if you’re building a marketplace business in 2020.

- His analysis of marketplaces for home school, child care, therapy, construction, and more.

- How this intersects with the future of work and the future of food.

- Why certain legacy marketplaces have managed to stick around.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Marco DeMeireles (@MarcoDeMeireles), partner at TCG, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How the firm came to be and how they think about portfolio construction.

- What owning the life stage means and why it makes for better businesses.

- Some of the spaces they’re thinking about, including weddings, fertility, and funerals.

- Marco’s thoughts on e-commerce enablement.

- His other requests for startups.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Michael Galpert (@msg) and Greg Isenberg (@gregisenberg) join Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- What’s changed about consumer social in the past year
- The rise of vertical social networks
- The success and future of TikTok
- The role of startup acquisitions in making a successful social network
- Will there be a new social network for every generation
- Will future social networks incorporate a physical element
- How will consumer social be different a year from now

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Burak Yenigun (@BurakYngn), founder of Stylus Capital, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The problem of founder scarcity and why it exists.

- The most effective levers for increasing the number of founders.

- Whether we are in a bubble or not.

- What founders need to know when thinking about interest rates.

- The advantages and disadvantages of risk-sharing arrangements for founders, and how they would work.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Brent Beshore (@BrentBeshore), founder and CEO of Adventur.es, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- What makes Adventur.es “the inverse of traditional private equity,” including why they don’t add debt to a company’s balance sheet when they purchase a company and intend to keep the existing leadership around.

- What Silicon Valley doesn’t get about private equity, how it’s different from venture, and how VC and PE might interact in the future.

- Some of the industries that Brent thinks are overlooked and the breakdown of some of their past investments.

- The book he wrote, The Messy Marketplace, and the lessons it holds for business owners.

- The state of the macro environment and how they think about it at Adventur.es.

- How they evaluate potential investments and business partners, and his strategies for evaluating people in general.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

David Booth (@david__booth), co-founder and CEO of On Deck, joins Erik on this episode.

They talk about:

- Why they started On Deck and the problem they were trying to solve.

- Common misconceptions about successful founding teams and the type of relationship needed between co-founders.

- The importance of community and how to build a positive one.

- Co-Sign and the idea of peer-to-peer credentialing.

- Where it’s best to be building a company today.

- How young people today can build their own syllabus and learn outside of a traditional college.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Sam Lessin (@lessin) and Bobby Goodlatte (@rsg) join Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- The future of consumer social
- How can consumer social startups compete with incumbents
- How do you incentivize user growth on new platforms
- Are Twitter and Instagram going away
- What are the most interesting new ideas in consumer social
- Which new consumer social networks will be successful
- What technologies will enable the next wave of social networks
- Will decentralized social networks ever happen
- How can platforms capture and enable social capital


Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Vlad Magdalin (@callmevlad), co-founder and CEO of Webflow, and Yasmin Razavi (@YasminRazavi), partner at Spark Capital, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The history of the no-code space and the evolution of Webflow.

- Whether it was obvious that no-code would take off when Vlad was working on the company in the mid-2000s.

- How Webflow is giving the people closest to the users the power to work on solutions for the users.

- Why to Vlad it feels like 1999 on the internet again.

- Vlad’s requests for startups and where he would be investing if he was running a no-code fund.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Patrick Blumenthal is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Dan Runcie (@RuncieDan) of Trapital joins Erik to business and strategy in hip-hop.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Zack Kanter (@zackkanter), founder and CEO of Stedi.com, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How Zack thinks about Twitter, why from outside it seems absurd, and why he calls it a “text-based role-playing game.”

- How he navigated the idea maze in starting Stedi and the key insight he had that led him to start the company.

- How the legibility problem from the book Seeing Like a State has changed how he approaches company-building.

- Why he says that “code is not an asset, code is a liability” and how AWS Lambda has changed how he built Stedi —and how all of this is related to legibility.

- Why they don’t do performance reviews and what it means to have an “event-driven” culture.

- His perspective on bootstrapping versus taking VC, why he says that founding companies requires domain expertise now, and why he built the company in Boulder.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Nadia Eghbal (@nayafia) of Substack joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How the internet changes how we find meaning and why new religions haven’t emerged from the internet yet.

- The future of newspapers and publishing, and what happens if people can go direct to the reporters they trust via tools like Substack and others.

- Her interest in the economics of content creators on the internet.

- Shamelessness as a strategy.

- Status on the internet and whether it’s really zero sum.

- Global cooperation and local versus global impacts.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Sarah Tavel (@sarahtavel), partner at Benchmark, and Ben Rubin (@benrbn), founder of Houseparty and Meerkat, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Where the white space is in social and the possibilities for vertical-specific social networks.

- Why Facebook looks to young people today the way Yahoo! looked to Sarah’s generation.

- What participatory social looks like and how to solve the problem of presence.

- Their ideas for new social networks.

- What Twitter could have been.

- How social interacts with gaming, audio, dating, and other spaces.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Phin Barnes (@phineasb) and Brett Berson (@brettberson), partners at First Round Capital, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Why when First Round was started VC was mainly an “anti-network business.”

- How the needs of founders and companies have evolved since First Round was started.

- The four phases of a company and when to think about raising funds.

- How to think about price as an investor.

- What, in their opinion, are the predictors of founder success.

- Some of the projects and initiatives they’ve worked on at First Round.

- How they get up to speed quickly on different spaces.

- The future of the firm.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Hiten Shah (@hnshah), Co-Founder of FYI, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Frameworks for picking startup ideas
- Navigating the Idea Maze
- How has the enterprise market changed in the past decade
- Investment outlook for “future of work”
- How has growth hacking and go-to-market evolved over the past decade
- How to select your customers
- Deciding on pricing
- When do you start charging
- How to think about retention
- Can Linkedin be disrupted

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Justin Mares (@jwmares), founder of Kettle & Fire and Perfect Keto, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The state of CPG, the history of the market, and the problems with the incentive structure today.

- What has led to the decline in the health of the average American and where Silicon Valley goes wrong with its approach to food.

- Where he would be investing if he was running a fund focused on health and wellness.

- How to find non-traditional talent.

- Why he is short San Francisco.

- And much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Santiago Suarez (@SantiaSua) of Addi joins Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- Is lending a cyclical business
- Lending as a form of customer acquisition
- What can fintech lending companies learn from Affirm and Square
- How lending in LatAm differs from North America
- How to develop competitive advantages as a lending business in LatAm
- Lessons to learn from scaling very fast
- How to hire early employees
- How to decide your company’s culture
- How can lending startups compete with banks
- How should lending startups think about balance sheet risk
- How has the lending ecosystem changed in the past decade
- Thoughts on Clearanc
- Common mistakes of finch startups

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Erik is joined on this episode by Mike Maples (@m2jr) of Floodgate. They Discuss:

- Have all of the low hanging fruit of startup ideas been picked
- How do the best founders approach entrepreneurship
- Mike’s thoughts on the various conventional wisdoms of building startups
- The power of “change events” for startup creation
- How important is market timing
- How important is it for your idea to be non-consensus
- What makes a great founding team
- Can you predict product market fit
- Why do co-founder breakups happen and how do you prevent them
- How do you know when you have an insight that’s worth pursuing
- Thoughts on the Operator Angel movement
- What does VC look like a decade from now
- The relationship between VCs and their LPs
- Investing in non-tech businesses
- Can crypto disrupt the VC model
- Mental models for what makes a successful investor


Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

James Currier (@JamesCurrier) of NFX join Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- Why hasn’t Linkedin been disrupted yet
- What does crypto do for generating network effects
- Where are today’s opportunities in consumer social
- Market networks and how they’ve evolved over time
- What’s wrong with education and can homeschooling be a solution
- Commoditization of higher education
- How to evaluate startup ideas
- How will venture evolve over the next decade
- What should founders better appreciate about the psychology of VCs

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Neal Hansch (@nhansch) and Liz Keen (@Liz_Keen) of Silicon Foundry join Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- How Silicon Foundry is building bridges between communities
- How corporations have interfaced with Silicon Valley over time
- The purpose and rise of Corporate Venture Capital
- How have accelerators evolved and what opportunities have they created for corporations
- The role venture studios play in corporate innovation
- When should startup founders start talking to Corp Dev teams
- What are the most common mistakes of corporations dealing with startups and vice versa
- What does great corporate innovation look like from an organizational perspective
- The role of Economic Development Corporations
- Corporate VCs betting against their core business


Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Charlie Noyes (@_charlienoyes) of Paradigm joins Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- How has the crypto landscape changed in the last year
- The future of Decentralized Finance
- Is Bitcoin likely to be more valuable a decade from now
- The future of Ether
- Will ICOs make a comeback
- How tied is the rise of crypto to global disorder
- Will prediction & idea markets ever happen
- Charlie’s request for startups
- Crypto narratives in 2020

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Carlota Perez (@CarlotaPrzPerez) joins Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- The stage of the current technological revolution
- The effects of income polarization in the 21st century and how we correct it
- Planned obsolescence as the dominant theory in manufacturing
- The benefits of a basic income
- The similarities and differences between the mass production era and the information era
- Changes to the U.S. tax system
- Should Facebook be broken up
- How do you recognize when a technological revolution is happening
- What does the next revolution look like
- How revolutions influence which ideas become popular
- Is China on its own economic cycle

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Ike Lasater (@IkeLasater) joins Erik on this episode to discuss nonviolent communication.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Turner Novak (@TurnerNovak) of Gelt Venture Capital joins Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- Can the Vision Fund find product market fit through mega LPs
- The relationship between LPs and VCs and how it’s going to change over time
- How will venture as an asset class change over the next decade
- The future of WeWork
- Is Uber's valuation reasonable
- Who are the winners of micro mobility
- What’s exciting about consumer social
- Should we be bullish on Snapchat and Bitmoji

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Phil Bonello (@PhilJBonello) joins Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- Building an investment thesis around The Sovereign Individual
- The future of nation states
- Crypto’s role in self-sovereignty
- What will lead to user adoption of crypto
- Why is censorship on the rise
- How has the logic of violence evolved over time
- The future of cities
- How does education need to respond to the Information age
- The future of fiat currencies
- The defensibility of bitcoin
- Valuation models for crypto assets
- The promise of governance tokens
- Why haven’t prediction markets taken off
- What are decentralized networks uniquely suited for
- What’s going to be the biggest milestone in crypto in the next couple of years

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Jonathan Haidt (@JonHaidt), a social psychologist at NYU-Stern, joins Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- What are the problems with social media and are they temporary or lasting issues
- How social media has affected Gen Z
- What led to the rise of polarization
- What needs to happen to solve the issues of social media
- When do you design for humanity’s evolutionary flaws
- Has politics replaced religion as a source of identity
- Activism versus truth seeking
- Is Democracy doomed

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Patri Friedman (@patrissimo) of Pronomos Capital joins Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- Why now for charter cities
- The role of Incrementalism versus disruption in creating charter cities
- Request for startups
- Which geographies will be the most important for the charter city movement
- How will geopolitics affect the growth of charter cities
- What’s going to be the spark that allows charter cities to take off
- The role of venture capital in funding charter cities
- How will national identities evolve over time
- How crypto networks will play a role in real world governance
- The future of nation states
- The decline of religion and its role in society
- How will charter cities affect equality
- When to overcome evolutionary instincts versus when to accept them
- What’s the future of cities and suburbs
- The future of Silicon Valley

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Ash Fontana (@ashfontana), General Partner at Zetta, and Leo Polovets (@lpolovets), General Partner at Susa Ventures, join Erik on this episode. They Discuss:

- What does the future of venture capital look like?
- Which firms are leading venture capital and who will be the top venture firms 10 years from now?
- Being a generalist investor versus a specialist
- Portfolio structure and the role of follow-on funding as part of a firm's strategy
- Is it important to have one portfolio company that can return the entire fund?
- Are there moats in venture capital?
- The role of pricing power in venture capital
- How is venture similar and different to company building?
- Compounding Data Moats
- Request for Startups

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Olaf Sakkers (@osakkers), Partner at Maniv Mobility, and Prescott Watson (@prescottwatson), Principal at Maniv Mobility, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- How mobility has changed in the past 5 years

- Investable companies in mobility

- The role of private infrastructure versus public infrastructure

- Buying versus leasing assets in mobility

- When and where do incumbents beat startups

- The incumbents that will still be around 10 years from now

- The winners and losers of the mobility race

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Nan Li (@nanli), Managing Director at Obvious Ventures, and Zavain Dar (@zavaindar), partner at Lux Capital, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

-How Deep Tech has evolved over time

-The state of Computational Biology today

-What the future of Biology looks like

-What Big Pharma is focused on and the market opportunity for biotech startups

-What’s their request for startups in computational biology

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Malay Ghandi (@malayhgandhi) of Evidation Health and Nikhil Krishnan (@nikillinit) of TrialSpark join Erik to talk all things digital health in 2019.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Venture capitalists Greg Rosen (@Grosen) at Bedrock and John Melas Kyriazi (@jmelaskyriazi) at Spark join Erik to discuss:

- Deep tech as the answer to the drought of pure play consumer companies.

- Leveraging regulatory arbitrages for deep tech companies to get to market faster.

- Intersection of consumer and biotech.

- Enabling infrastructure for biotech.

- Emergence of food/agtech.

- New computing platforms.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Sarah Tavel (@sarahtavel), partner at Benchmark, and Nabeel Hyatt (@nabeel), partner at Spark Capital, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Why they love investing in marketplaces and the evolution of marketplaces over the last decade.

- Why the wave of Uber For X startups didn’t take off.

- How they evaluate marketplaces, and why founders get confused about “which race they’re running” when creating a marketplace startup.

- Where they’re excited about seeing more marketplaces and which spaces they advise founders to avoid.

- The impact of SoftBank and their analysis of the current crop of public marketplace companies.

- Common mistakes they see founders making in marketplace startups.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Eric Vishria (@ericvishria) and Chetan Puttagunta (@chetanp), general partners at Benchmark, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The unique partnership structure at Benchmark and how it has led to the continued success of the firm.

- Why they are purposefully not trying to scale the firm, unlike other venture firms.

- Their investments in open source, why the space is unique, and where the white space is.

- What will change in the future in open source and web infrastructure.

- Biotech as a space and some of the companies they’ve invested in.

- Why entering the healthcare market is fraught with difficulty in the US.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Bailey Richardson (@baileyelaine), partner at People & Company, and co-author of Get Together, and Rei Wang (@heyreiwang), founder of The Grand and former CEO of the Dorm Room Fund Investment Team, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The companies they’re creating and the unique insight about communities that lies behind each company.

- How they define community, and what makes a community different from other things like networks.

- How communities change over their lifetimes.

- The differences between the big companies in the social media space and how they’ve evolved over time.

- Whether community startups can be venture-backable.

- The future of countries and religions as communities.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Brian Frank (@bfrank) of FTW Ventures, and Rob Rhinehart (@robrhinehart) of Soylent, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Some of the most exciting developments in bioscience these days.

- The possibilities for biohacking and whether there is an “AWS for bioscience” emerging.

- The interplay of startups and incumbents in the space and how incumbents can be more helpful to the startup community.

- What is under- or over-hyped in the space.

- The existing big companies in food and bioscience and what will change in the next 5-10 years.

- The future of retail and how data can transform supply chains.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Joel Monegro (@jmonegro), partner at Placeholder, joins Erik on this episode.

They talk about:

- The waves of centralization and decentralization in finance, government, and culture over time.

- How value accruing to incumbents has resulted in completely new fields opening up for innovation.

- Why crypto networks are analogous to countries.

- Joel’s thesis that "ultimately capital is control."

- Why crypto is not a new technology revolution.

- How crypto can change the problem of mis-distribution of capital in societies.

- How Joel’s thinking on these topics has influenced his investment thesis.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Keith Rabois (@rabois), partner at Founders Fund, joins Erik on this episode. It was recorded live at an On Deck Fellowship event in San Francisco.

They discuss:

- The kinds of companies and founders he looks to fund, including why he wants half of his VC friends to laugh at how ambitious and ridiculous the companies he’s funding are.

- Why going from zero to one involves roughly the same amount of pain no matter whether the “one” the company gets to is tiny or a billion-dollar-plus enterprise.

- Some of the different spaces he’s invested in recently and how he’s navigated the idea maze in different sectors.

- Stories from the early days of PayPal.

- Why he likes regulated markets, and why he says “the more legal risk, the better.”

- How to think about creating a founding team, and why you need to absolutely make sure you and your co-founders agree on first principles.

And of course, they also discuss basketball and politics.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Katherine Boyle (@KTmBoyle), investor at General Catalyst, and Bilal Zuberi (@bznotes), partner at Lux Capital, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Their requests for startups in the space.

- The current landscape and the types of companies they are looking to invest in.

- What implications geopolitics has for the deep tech space.

- Their predictions for the next ten years.

- Katherine’s thesis about the privatization of government.

- What to know about how the defense sector works.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Ruben Harris (@rubenharris), founder of Career Karma, and David Phillips (@davj), founder of Hackbright Academy and BloomJoy, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The history and evolution of bootcamps, including how and where they got their start.

- Why Ruben thinks that in the long term the cost of education goes to zero.

- Whether bootcamps for non-technical skills can become as big as those for technical skills.

- Why there haven’t been bigger exits in the space.

- Their requests for startups.

- Why big companies like Microsoft or Google haven’t yet created their own bootcamps.

- Their predictions for how the landscape will have changed in the next ten years.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Isaac Morehouse (@isaacmorehouse), CEO of Crash, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- His background and why he started Crash.

- What he would change about the incentive structure of the world if he could wave a magic wand.

- What kinds of big companies will possibly emerge in the education space.

- What self-credentialing and peer-to-peer credentialing would look like.

- Why he would like to see markets in everything.

- Why the burden of proof for going to college has reached a tipping point, where students are now mostly skeptics while parents remain believers.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Greg Castle (@gpcastle12) joins Erik on this episode. He is managing partner at Anorak Ventures.

They discuss:

- What the future of computing beyond laptops and phones will look like, the obstacles companies will face, and the cultural challenges ahead.

- Why audio will represent the first wave of AR.

- Some of the coolest applications he’s seen in the space, including the work some of his portfolio companies are doing.

- Which of the big incumbents are best poised to take advantage of the transition to AR/VR.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Adam Draper (@AdamDraper), founder and managing director of Boost VC, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Adam’s early involvement in crypto and how the space has evolved over time.

- What he finds unique about the people working in crypto and what he loves about their outlook.

- The science fiction technologies that he’s excited about and looking to invest in.

- AR and VR and the opportunities and challenges for each.

- Why he says the next ten years will be about big tech versus big government.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Kelly Chen (@kaychen22), partner at DCVC, and Kane Hseih (@kane), partner at Root Ventures, join Erik on this episode.

They talk about:

- What exactly industrial automation is and why it’s such an exciting space.

- The market map for industrial automation.

- Some of the coolest companies and applications of technology in the space.

- Advice for companies pitching their industrial automation products.

- Their requests for startups (and their anti-requests for startups).

- How jobs will change with the advent of automation.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Victor Pontis (@ and Michal Naka (@ join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Comparisons and contrasts between micromobility and rideshare

- How regulations have evolved and how cities are getting involved in the space.

- The possibilities for autonomy in micromobility.

- Possible new form factors.

- Which metrics investors interested in the space should be tracking.

- Who they would be betting on if they were betting on a new operator.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Julia Enthoven (@JuliaEnthoven), co-founder and CEO of Kapwing, and Justine and Olivia Moore (@venturetwins), investors at CRV, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Why the team at CRV was excited about Julia and Kapwing.

- The rise of online video and their analysis of the space.

- What it means to be a B2C2B company.

- The problems with existing video editing tools.

- The confluence of factors that enabled Kapwing.

- Their requests for startups.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Delian Asparouhov (@zebulgar), investor at Founders Fund, and Felix Ejeckam (@felixejeckam), CEO of Akash Systems, join Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The market map of the space space.

- The evolution of the industry and how we got to where we are now.

- The incredible possibilities that can be enabled by the companies working in space today.

- What the “iPhone moment” could be for the industry.

- How the government interacts with the space and the implications for companies within it.

- Their predictions for when people might be living in space.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Daniel Schmachtenberger joins Erik on this episode. He is a civilization designer interested in social architecture.

They discuss:

- The unsustainability of economic growth.

- Why what’s best for the long-term is often also best for others.

- Asymmetries in markets and why markets are not actually self-correcting.

- What a healthy version of social media might look like.

- What Daniel means when he says “humans are not evolutionarily precedented creatures” and what the implications of that are.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Comedians Ben Burke and Shiva Kilaru, the creators behind the moderately successful YouTube channel KRAZAM, join Erik on this "unique" episode.

They discuss:

- The creative process.

- Their thoughts on Austrian economics.

- Mental models.

- Violent communication. 

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Harj Taggar (@harjtaggar), co-founder and chairman of Triplebyte, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Strategies for finding undiscovered talent.

- The vision at Triplebyte and what they’re building.

- Why the recruiting space hasn’t seen huge companies come out of it.

- How building a company has changed over the past decade.

- How to think about finding a co-founder.

- The biggest recruiting mistakes people make.

- How to think about what startup to join as an employee.

- How much founders should think about retention in early-stage startups.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Balaji Srinivasan (@balajis), angel investor and entrepreneur, and Glen Weyl (@glenweyl), economist, Principal Researcher at Microsoft, and author of Radical Markets, join Erik for a fireside chat.

They talk about:

- On which topics they agree or disagree.

- Some of their favorite thinkers.

- Glen’s critique of the libertarian view of the world.

- Balaji’s concept of a person’s whitelist, blacklist, and greenlist.

- What they would change about property law.

- Quadratic finance and quadratic voting.

- Why there is almost no area where the nation-state is the optimal governance entity.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Jerry Yang, co-founder of Yahoo! and founding partner of AME Cloud Ventures, joined us in downtown San Francisco to be interviewed by Village Global co-founder and partner, Ben Casnocha.

They talked about stories from the early days of Yahoo! and lessons learned from the experience, what American entrepreneurs can learn from China, and his strategy for early-stage investing.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Arnold Kling (@KlingBlog), author and economist, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The future of elites.

- The charter city movement.

- His thoughts on Austrian economics.

- How he would approach regulating finance.

- Negative interest rates.

- How to solve the problem of high healthcare costs in the US.

- Universal basic income.

- What an Elizabeth Warren presidency might look like.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Wolf Tivy (@wolftivy), founder and editor of Palladium Magazine, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The liberal order, including what it specifically entails and the evolution of it over time.

- Why what really defines the liberal order is a public story around what is acceptable and not.

- The superstructure of non-elected power in society.

- Potential alternative systems for order.

- Why even in free societies, there is a small bubble of acceptable ideas that forms an orthodoxy around what one can say and do.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Andy Matuschak (@andy_matuschak), joins Erik on this episode. He is a technologist, designer and researcher.

They discuss:

- The key thread throughout his work and what he’s trying to accomplish.

- Why people read books despite remembering little of what they read.

- What books should look like and the features they should have in the digital age.

- Why spaced repetition is so powerful.

- His requests for startups in the space.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Martin Gurri (@mgurri), author of The Revolt of The Public, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Martin’s advice for Silicon Valley elites.

- How to restore trust in democracy.

- Why and how politicians became performers.

- The history of information.

- What will end the techlash.

- The results of government colliding with digitization.

… And much more.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Vinay Gupta (@leashless), CEO of Mattereum, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The effects of overconsumption on the environment.

- The breakdown of humanity’s carbon footprint.

- Why we need to optimize waste in the same way that we optimize investment and production.

- How to reduce the perceived fragility of life for those living in poverty.

- Buckminster Fuller’s ambitions and why we’re living in the world that he wanted us to avoid.

- Why Vinay “never trusted the decentralization framework.”

- Why the vast majority of problems caused by poverty can be fixed with half a dozen simple machines but that market capitalism is not able to provide them to those in need.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Visakan Veerasamy (@visakanv) joins Erik on this episode for a conversation about friendship, Twitter as a global brain, online communities, fame, how we can better relate to others, and more.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Robert Tracinski (@Tracinski) and Jason Crawford (@jasoncrawford) join Erik on this episode. Robert is an author and Jason is an entrepreneur. They are both part of Roots of Progress, a blog about the ascent of mankind, from the caves to computers and beyond.

They discuss:

- The idea of a “capitalism appreciation society” akin to an art appreciation society.

- The backward perspectives that people have on economic progress.

- Their answers to the critiques of capitalism as unsustainable.

- How society has changed from biological sources of resources to artificial ones over time.

- Whether automation will mean that people work less in the future.

- Growth and its relationship to democracy.

- The role of business in ensuring the welfare of people in a country.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Bret Weinstein (@BretWeinstein). He is a biologist and evolutionary theorist.

They discuss:

- His start in the field of evolutionary biology and how he realized that the big questions everyone thought had been answered actually only seemed that way because the big questions had stopped being asked.

- Why two characteristics of a given creature or object cannot be maximized at the same time, and why thinking in terms of trade-offs explains virtually all of biology and society.

- Why he says “any utopian is not welcome at the adult table to discuss modern civilization.”

- Why we need to get over the idea that we can blueprint a society that works.

- Why markets are excellent at telling us how to do things but terrible at telling us what we should want.

- Game B and some of the stubs of that idea that exist today that could be built out.

- Why “no honorable person would choose to do what natural selection wants us to do.”

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Bill Janeway (@billjaneway) joins Erik on this episode. Bill is a venture capitalist and economist and is the author of the classic book Doing Capitalism in the Innovation Economy.

They talk about:

- Bill’s keen interest in the interface of markets and government and how that thread has weaved its way through Bill’s career.

- Why financialization has gone too far.

- The fact that Bill “lived through the last AI hype cycle” and what that means for this one.

- The difference between productive and non-productive bubbles.

- Why free marketeers should “be careful what you wish for.”

- The possibilities for global cooperation on climate change.

- Why it’s important that disruptors take time to understand how the world they’re disrupting came to be.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Sarah Perry (@sarahdoingthing), writer and thinker, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Sarah’s writing career and what it means to “work through your politics” early in your career as a writer.

- The purpose of rituals and why democracy is itself a form of ritual.

- Why ambiguity increases meaning.

- What we as a culture don’t understand about meaning.

- The narrative illusion in life, that there’s “nothing but time” and that that is the place from which meaning comes.

- How to have non-zero-sum status in a society.

- What it means to make the “honest decision.”

- Why humor is so powerful.

- Why people (mistakenly) romanticize the past.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Joe Edelman (@edelwax), philosopher, social scientist, designer, and founder of Human Systems, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- Why the internet didn’t achieve its promise of connecting people on a deeper level.

- Why we’ve become very good at shopping and networking around goals and preferences but not around values, and how this manifests in the differences between Couchsurfing and Airbnb.

- Why he says that philosophers and micro-economists have the best ability to figure out how people make choices, and why their approach is better than that of psychology or neuroscience.

- How a “meaning economy” or “wisdom economy” could work.

- His explanation for what values mean to him, and how his have changed over time.

- How he would change Twitter, Facebook, and Tinder, if he was in charge of product at those companies.

- Why people who break down all their decisions in complicated spreadsheets are fooling themselves into thinking they’ve made a better decision.

- How metrics and values interact, and how to think about metrics in your personal life.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Paul Bohm (@paulsbohm), investor and entrepreneur.

They tackle a variety of topics on this wide-ranging episode, including:

- How Paul became fascinated with self-perpetuating systems.

- Why the European startup scene is problematic, why he is short Silicon Valley, and the idea of importing law from one jurisdiction to another (as companies do with Delaware C Corp designation).

- The idea of narrative bias, what a “zombie field” is, and the rule of “Occam’s Bikini.”

- Why he thinks that the prospects for AI and its impact on the world are overrated, despite the increasing hype cycle around the field.

- His thoughts on collective sense-making and why, if we can’t escape echo chambers, we need a diversity of echo chambers.

- Why he looks to youth as harbingers for how society will evolve in the future.

- Influencer culture and why he says the impact of it is actually underrated.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by John Vervaeke (@vervaeke_john), a psychology and cognitive science professor at the University of Toronto.

They discuss:

- How John has been working on bridging the gap between cognitive science and spirituality.

- Why he says that we need to “awaken” from the meaning crisis, not “solve” it.

- What he wants people building virtual reality and social media platforms to know.

- Why he says that people these days don’t value democracy the way people did in the past.

- The biggest questions that he has been wrestling with in his research.

- How meaning is distinct from happiness or well-being.

- How “we’ve killed God and replaced it with a marketplace.”

- Whether we will see the emergence of new religions, or “upgrades” to the existing ones.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Charles Eisenstein (@ceisenstein) on this episode. He is the author of Climate: A New Story and The Ascent of Humanity, among others.

They discuss:

- The main thread that runs throughout Charles’s works.

- Why technological utopias and the age of leisure have been widely predicted but have never actually come about.

- How humanity shaping its environment has caused problems for humans, and why trying harder and harder to solve those problems has perpetuated them.

- Why the happiest people he meets are in less developed countries.

- What he sees as the limits to scientific inquiry.

- The ideal scale and scope of markets.

- What he would change about society if he could wave a wand.

- Whether the planet really needs “the economy to get going again” even though that seems to be what virtually every politician calls for.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Bonnitta Roy (@bonnittaroy), philosopher, author, organizational consultant, and insight guide.

They discuss:

- The new way of looking at the world that she advocates for.

- Why she says that scientific thinking does not serve humanity well in all situations.

- Why people take approaches to problems that result in increasingly complex systems over time.

- The limitations of systems thinking and determinism.

- Insights from cognitive neuroscience about how the body takes in information.

- Her learnings from the organizational consulting that she does and how teams can work more effectively.

- The “malware” that she says is present in our ways of thinking about the world, and whether it is innate to humans or a result of the influence of society.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Laura Deming (@laurademing), creator of Longevity Fund, and Will Eden (@williamaeden), entrepreneur in residence at Errik Anderson and formerly of Thiel Capital, join Erik on this episode.

They talk about:

- The history of biotech and the big trends and companies in the space over the past several decades.

- The breakdown of the different areas within biotech.

- The new business model in biotech that’s been driven by VCs.

- How the public market in biotech companies is impacting the private market

- The history of the FDA and how it has evolved over time, including the fact that in the beginning, the FDA only looked at whether a drug was safe, not whether it was effective.

- How they would change the regulatory environment if they could wave a magic wand.

- Why Laura says that the most effective individuals in biotech have a determinate worldview.

- How longevity has emerged over the past several years, and the future of work in the space.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Jordan Hall (@jgreenhall) joins Erik on this episode. He is founder of Neurohacker Collective and an influential thinker about Game B.

In this episode they discuss:

- His frustrations with Silicon Valley and what he wishes entrepreneurs understood better about the system in which they are working.

- Why he thinks Steve Jobs’ talents could have been put to better use.

- The relation of software eating the world to topics around Game B.

- His explanation of the difference between something with a lot of complexity versus something that is complicated.

- The difference between “valley crossing” and “hill climbing” in modern society.

- Why he thinks humanity will run into a problem of scale around the middle of the century.

- Why he says that “we are all running a lot of malware.”

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Jim Rutt (@jim_rutt) joins Erik on this episode. He is an entrepreneur, technologist, research fellow, and host of The Jim Rutt Show.

Note that this episode contains adult language and may not be suitable for listening in all situations.

They discuss:

- The change in the ethos of business over the last several decades, and why it’s now the case in Jim’s opinion that “honesty and good faith is a sucker strategy.”

- Why Jim is no longer an Ayn Randian.

- How to change politics and society via the Game B movement.

- How to design better political systems.

- What liquid democracy entails and how it might be able to solve some of the problems of the current system.

- His argument against the idea of having less voice but more opportunity to exit in political systems.

- The problems he sees with Bitcoin.

- His learnings from his study of cognitive psychology.

- What a “gigantism tax” on huge corporations would look like.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Erik is joined on this episode by JD Ross (@justindross) and Sean Linehan (@seanlinehan). JD is co-founder of Opendoor and Sean is co-founder of Placement and former VP of Product at Flexport.

They discuss:

- What Sean is doing with Placement and his personal story for where the idea came from.

- How they “navigated the idea maze” and what they learned from the ideating they did.

- What has led to the rise of the ISA and their thoughts on the space.

- How they think about working in spaces that are highly regulated.

- The future of San Francisco as a tech hub.

- Why the next evolution in the US economy will be a shift to an “experience economy.”

- Their thoughts on charter cities, and why JD says there could be a new city built from scratch in the US today.

- The idea of “skills debt” as analogous to technical debt.

- Some of their ideas around new forms of private equity.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Andrew Kortina (@kortina) joins Erik on this episode. He is the co-founder of Venmo and Fin.

They talk about:

- How he became interested in the US tax code and what changes he might like to see made to it.

- The insights from his examination of how the US government spends its money.

- Capitalism, inequality, and how to ensure everyone can live a life with dignity.

- Status signalling through consumption and how to fix the inefficiency of conveying information through goods.

- Tribalism as a predictive model.

- What David Foster Wallace predicted about the internet and culture today, and what he might be writing about if he was still alive.

- Capitalism as an artificial intelligence.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Zachary Stein (zakstein.org) joins Erik on this episode. He is a writer, educator, and futurist.

They discuss:

- Why he says that all institutions are fundamentally educational institutions.

- The crises that humankind is facing and how to make our way through them.

- The new educational paradigms he foresees.

- What it means to be psychologically sovereign.

- The history of measurement and the fact that prior to a few hundred years ago, no one knew how old they actually were.

- How to resolve the paradox that what matters cannot be measured and yet it is difficult to improve or make progress without measuring.

- Why he says that throughout capitalism there have rarely been true markets.

- His thoughts on globalization and interconnectedness.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Bryan Caplan (@bryan_caplan), economist and author. They have a wide-ranging discussion on a number of different topics.

They discuss:

- The case for open borders and the underappreciated benefits of immigration.

- His responses to some of the common arguments against increased immigration.

- Why he thinks that universal basic income is a “terrible idea.”

- His thoughts on the charter cities movement.

- His most impactful (and controversial) policy recommendations.

- Why he says that all politicians have been populists, but without the rough edges that Trump has.

- His opinion on the Hobbes vs. Rousseau debate.

- Gene editing, population growth, Austrian economics, education, and much more.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Richard Craib (@richardcraib), founder of Numerai and Erasure, and Riva-Melissa Tez (@rivatez), part of strategy at Intel.

They discuss:

- What Richard is working on at Numerai, a hedge fund that gives away its (anonymized) data for free.

- The Erasure protocol and the value of information marketplaces.

- Whether prediction markets for stocks can work.

- Whether the Numerai model could work with other types of data, for example, in healthcare.

- Whether the quality of startups in San Francisco is going down or up.

- The future of universities.

- The lack of diversity of political views in San Francisco.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

______

Village Global’s Network Catalyst accelerator is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Taylor Pearson (@TaylorPearsonMe), joins Erik on this episode. He is an author, entrepreneur, and investor.

On this episode they talk about:

- The basics of the thesis that markets are eating the world and how Taylor became interested in the idea.

- The implications of markets becoming more prevalent in every aspect of life.

- How smart contracts and the blockchain enable markets to eat the world.

- How closely related the idea that software is eating the world is to the idea that markets are.

- Some of the arguments against the idea and Taylor’s responses to them.

- The key questions for the future.

- What an investment firm with this thesis would invest in or what their requests for startups would be.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Samo Burja (@SamoBurja), founder of Bismarck Analysis, joins Erik for this episode. You can find him on Medium at medium.com/@samo.burja.

They talk about:

- Whether capitalism and democracy are incompatible and what the future holds for democracy.

- Why economists need to look inside companies to learn from their cultures, not just at the relations between companies.

- Why the grey hoody is as much a worker’s uniform as the suit of the 1950s was.

- The coming merger of east and west coast media companies.

- China, the trade war, and the effects of the country expanding its influence in Europe and the Middle East.

- Why the big story of the 21st century that everyone is missing is that the Indian Ocean will become the hub of the world economy.

- Why he’s skeptical about the extent to which crypto will decentralize society.

- What people misunderstand about Henry Kissinger’s approach to geopolitics.

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Tiago Forte (@fortelabs), creator of Building a Second Brain, founder of Forte Labs, and writer at Praxis.

They talk about:

- Why productivity is not an end in and of itself.

- Why content creation (not just consumption) is integral to your career.

- How to better deal with the 11 hours of media a day that the average person consumes.

- Why the “average human life is now too complex to be managed by the average human brain.”

- Why hyperfocus and intense productivity are symptoms of trauma, and how to deal with that trauma.

- The theory of constraints and why it’s so powerful.

- Religion and meaning-making for the secular world.

- The future of libraries and why Tiago calls them “digital nomad embassies.”

Remember to apply for the winter vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator! It is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This is a special live episode that was recorded at Village HQ in San Francisco on June 14 2018. It originally aired on July 4 2018. The event was put on in partnership with Xoogler, a network of former Googlers who have come together to help each other with their startup ambitions.

Village Global co-founder Erik Torenberg (@eriktorenberg) chatted with Jo Varshney (@jo_getter), founder and CEO of VeriSIM Life and Kiran Bellubbi (@smalldozes), founder of Keyo, about their experience with the Village Network Catalyst program.

Jo and Kiran explain what it was like to be a founder in Network Catalyst, including how the team at Village helped them with their business model, leveraged Village's unique structure as a network to their advantage, and guided them through the fundraising process.

Remember: applications for the winter 2019 vintage of our Network Catalyst accelerator are due September 20 2019 — make sure to apply before then. Check out more info below.

Village Global’s Network Catalyst accelerator is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply before September 20 at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Erik interviews Elliot Olds (@elliot_olds) on this episode. He is a thinker on AI, crypto, economics and prediction markets.

(Remember — applications for the winter vintage of our network catalyst accelerator are due September 20 — make sure to apply before then. Check out more info below.)

They talk about:

- The merits of prediction markets, and why they can be thought of as a “meta solution” akin to a generalized AI

- The technical and political hurdles that prediction markets face

- The most prominent arguments against prediction markets and the responses to them

- The idea that markets are eating the world and its implications

- Whether it would be wise to outsource your personal decisions to the crowd

- Governance in crypto

- What it would take to make prediction markets mainstream

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

________

Village Global’s Network Catalyst accelerator is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply before September 20 at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

We apologize for the audio quality of this episode — we had technical difficulties during recording.

Remember: applications for the winter vintage of our network catalyst accelerator are due September 20 — make sure to apply before then. Check out more info below.

Erik is joined on this episode by Dr. Cameron Sepah (@drsepah), founder, investor, entrepreneur, and a clinical psychologist.

They talk about:

- Why founders have to be “chief psychologists” (as popularized by Mark Suster)

- Which frameworks for personality types are helpful and which are not

- Why “to be great you have to be a bit abnormal”

- His recommendations on sleep, physical activity, and nutrition

- What a “dopamine fast” is and why you should commit to one

- Why meditation is not a panacea

- The difference between Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

_______

Village Global’s Network Catalyst accelerator is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply before September 20 at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Remember: applications for the winter vintage of our network catalyst accelerator are due September 20 — make sure to apply before then. Check out more info below.

Venkat Rao (@vgr), joins Erik on this episode. He writes at Ribbonfarm, Breaking Smart, and The Art of Gig.

They talk about:

- Why the ambient humour level fluctuates in a society and the “seriousness bubble” in Silicon Valley before 2016.

- Mediocrity and its merits.

- Hannah Arendt, humans as social creatures, and why “to be whole is to be a part.”

- What he thinks libertarians get wrong, and why they “are wrong in an interesting way.”

- How Silicon Valley has been evolving and how it can change to broaden the base of prosperity.

- Why he stays away from utopian thinking.

- The idea of shared reality tunnels and how they are similar to the evolution of television over the years.

- Where humans will derive meaning in the future.

- Why climate change will be the next big cultural battlefield.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

______

Village Global’s Network Catalyst accelerator is a personalized program that features masterclasses from some of the best in Silicon Valley and a dedicated network leader focused on making the introductions you need to turbocharge your company. You can participate in-person in San Francisco or virtually from anywhere around the world.

Find out more and apply before September 20 at villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst.

Erik is joined by David Gornoski on this episode. He is an entrepreneur, speaker, and writer.

They talk about:

- How David came to be interested in René Girard’s work.

- The explanation for why human desires are usually borrowed from each other.

- Mimesis and society’s role models.

- How Christianity has influenced society.

- The human fascination with conflict and drama.

- What religion can teach us.

- How Girardian philosophy applies to criminal justice, foreign policy, and government.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Robert Cottrell (@robertcottrell), editor of The Browser, joins Erik on this episode.

They talk about:

- The two main errors that publications made in the shift to online after the advent of the web.

- Why paywalls are not an effective model.

- The bond that readers have with individual writers rather than publications, and how business models could change to accommodate that.

- Why long form writing is the most under-appreciated form of art today.

- Lessons to learn from his prolific reading habits.

- The potential for curation by algorithm and what he’s working on in this area.

- How to combat fake news.

- The promise that effective machine translation holds for non-English publications.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Jeff Morris Jr. (@jmj), Director of Product, Revenue at Tinder, and investor at Chapter One, joins Erik on this episode.

We sincerely apologize for the audio quality of this episode. We had technical difficulties with the recording.

They discuss:

- Using tech to bridge online and offline experiences.

- The idea of wellness as a status symbol.

- What $10B companies may have emerged ten years from now.

- The future of dating apps.

- Why he’s excited about ISAs.

- Why tech talent might need agents.

- What he’s learned from the best product and monetization people.

- Whether there’s a “Silicon Valley exodus” going on.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by PJ Kershaw (@pjkershawnz), early stage investor and crypto thinker.

They discuss:

- Why PJ says that the current model of companies with shareholders has “reached its zenith.”

- How DAOs will change the world.

- How public goods can be better delivered using new models.

- Lessons from Singapore.

- The future of venture capital in the age of crypto.

- How VC fund structure will change.

- Who the LPs will be in new forms of funds.

- The difference between investing in Asia and the US.

- His investing thesis.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Lawson Baker (@lwsnbaker), head of special projects at TokenSoft. He’s also working on a new company.

They talk about:

* Bitcoin as the future not just of finance, but also of work.

* What the internet and the future of work looks like ten years out.

* The “de-evolution of the firm” and how corporations will become less important in business.

* Where Lawson would be investing if he was running a venture fund.

* Why prediction markets are so exciting to Lawson.

* How identity will change over time.

* The future of capitalism.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. The show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Brad Glisson (@GlissonBrad), co-founder and CEO of Quilt, formerly Thoughtblox.

They discuss:

- What social capital is, why it is important, and how it is distinctive from other forms of capital.

- The studies around social capital and some of their insights.

- How social capital impacts and intersects with reputation.

- Whether a codified reputation system, like a “Yelp for people” would ever be feasible (or desirable).

- What makes a great community.

- What Brad is working on in this space.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

We are honored to have Anne Wojcicki (@annewoj23), co-founder and CEO of 23andMe, among our small group of luminary LPs whose financial capital and engagement power the next wave of Village Global founders.

She joined us in Mountain View for an intimate fireside chat with the first Chief Data Scientist for the United States Office of Science and Technology Policy, DJ Patil (@dpatil).

They discussed:

- Why the US healthcare system is broken.

- The state of direct-to-consumer healthcare.

- Tailored medicine and the future of digital health.

- 23andMe’s drug discovery efforts and how continuous data monitoring can change how drugs are developed.

- The problem with clinical trials and how to fix them.

- How Anne would change the US healthcare system if she could wave a magic wand.

- The founding of 23andMe and the company’s philosophy.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Michael Dempsey (@mhdempsey), partner at Compound, joins Erik on this episode to talk through a wide array of sectors that he has delved into.

(We apologize for the audio quality of this episode. We had technical difficulties during recording).

They talk about:

- The model and approach at Compound, including how writing definitive blog posts about a particular industry fits into their investing strategy.

- The state of robotics today, including why he’s not as bullish on robots in warehouses as he once was, and how robots can potentially transform food and retail.

- Machine learning, its applications, and why it’s so difficult to reproduce the findings seen in research papers in the space.

- Different approaches to making self-driving cars work, and his predictions for the future of the industry.

- The state of the investment landscape for other applications of ML, including radiology, voice and phone calls, image recognition, and animation.

- Digital celebrities, identity, and how self-expression on the internet will change in the future.

- His deep dive into women’s health, family planning and reproductive health, and what kinds of opportunities exist in the space.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Erik is joined on this episode by Nicolas Colin, co-founder and director of The Family, and author of Hedge: A Greater Safety Net For The Entrepreneurial Age.

They discuss:

- Why in the future we can expect more social change from tech companies than from government.

- The key functions of version 1.0 of the social safety net.

- How to solve the problem that most jobs are located in cities, but cities are also mostly unaffordable.

- Why the 21st century will be more like the 19th century than the 20th.

- Why this is the entrepreneurial age, and what that means for workers.

- The story of the Rothschilds and how they prevented potential wars.

- The problems with universal basic income.

- How China is innovating on the social contract.

- The fact that nation-states are a recent invention and are not necessarily the only way to organize in the future.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Danielle Strachman (@DStrachman) and Mike Gibson (@William_Blake), co-founders and general partners at 1517 Fund. They also both worked extensively on the Thiel Fellowship.

They discuss:

- The story of the genesis of the Thiel Fellowship.

- The lessons learned from running the Fellowship.

- Their idiosyncratic paths to running a venture capital fund.

- The signals they relied on to find the right applicants.

- How to change how higher ed works in the US.

- The lessons that the US can learn from other countries when it comes to college.

- How students can have a conversation with their parents about not going to college.

- Whether something like the Thiel Fellowship can scale.

- The lessons that homeschooling has for other forms of education.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Alex Tabarrok (@ATabarrok), economist and author, joins Erik on this episode for a wide-ranging discussion.

They talk about:

- The contributions of economics to society over the past several decades and the biggest challenges ahead for the field

- What “the great forgetting” means in economics and why bad ideas from the past keep coming back

- The arguments for open borders

- Why Alex thinks we should focus on increasing the number of police as opposed to increasing punishment for offenders

- Whether the US or China will pull ahead in the next decades

- Whether capitalism and democracy are compatible

- Why “democracy is not the secret sauce to riches”

- The merits of inductive versus deductive thinking

- Why he thinks too few robots, not too many, is the cause of low wages

- His thoughts on cost disease

- How he would change academia, the FDA, healthcare, the tax code, and other areas if he could wave a magic wand

- The ways in which he thinks differently from other economists

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Seth Rosenberg (@SethGRosenberg), investor at Greylock, and Sheel Mohnot (@pitdesi), fintech investor at 500 Startups.

They talk about:

- The biggest opportunities in fintech today.

- How traditional finance can be rebuilt from the ground up using software.

- How to think about different market segments in fintech.

- Their requests for startups in the space.

- Why the big companies in fintech are converging on the same set of features.

- Facebook’s Libra and the impact it might have.

- The “Asia model” as represented by WeChat and Grab, and whether that might transfer to the US.

… And much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Samo Burja (@SamoBurja), founder of Bismarck Analysis, joins Erik for this episode. You can find him on Medium at medium.com/@samo.burja.

In this episode they discuss:

- Why certain societies flourish while others decay

- Where Samo stands on the nature versus nurture debate

- Why he has “yet to hear a satisfying description of human social life”

- The lessons we can learn from places like Singapore

- The difference between the view of government as resource for the people versus the view of people as resources for the government

- Why he’s skeptical of happiness research as it relates to countries

- Why neither Obama nor Trump were inevitable

- The future of China, the US, and globalization

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Daniel Pianko (@danielpianko), co-founder and managing director of University Ventures, and Andy Hall (@AndyHall_SD), COO of the San Diego Workforce Partnership.

They talk about:

- How ISAs have been able to transform lives through Andy’s program in San Diego.

- Why tech titans providing massive amounts of money for scholarships is a suboptimal way of getting underprivileged people into school.

- The chasm between work and school in America.

- The fact that over 50% of all private donations go to 50 schools in the US.

- Potential bottlenecks to ISA adoption and how they can be solved.

- Why only 25% of people end up with a first job related to their degree.

- How to think about public vs. private responsibility to increase access to education in the US.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik is joined by Chuck Trafton (@chucktrafton), of FlowPoint and edly, and Will Nelligan (@williamnelligan), of the Education Finance Institute.

They talk about:

- Why there needs to be a marketplace for ISAs.

- How ISAs ensure that schools have “skin in the game.”

- The problems with student loans.

- The mechanics of ISA repayment and the ways in which they are progressive.

- Why ISAs provide a unique opportunity for investors.

- How ISAs can fix some of the perverse incentives that schools have.

- Legislation that will enable ISAs to be more widespread.

- Why it makes financial sense for schools to spend so much money on “customer acquisition” and how ISAs can create a new funding model for higher ed institutions.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Robert Wright (@robertwrighter), author of Nonzero, The Moral Animal, Why Buddhism Is True, and others, joins Erik on this episode.

They discuss:

- The common theme of exploring the meaning of life that Robert says runs through all of his books.

- Whether global governance could be feasible and how positive-sum thinking can play a part in reducing hostilities between nations.

- Why consciousness gives life meaning.

- How to deal with the quest for status.

- The emotional manipulation that political leaders employ.

- Why we shouldn’t rush to bring in new technologies before we know the consequences.

- Why evolution has not programmed us to be happy.

- How to deal with tribalism.

- Why people say that “to explain something is to excuse it” and why not thinking that way can bring about a more compassionate world.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Glen Weyl (@glenweyl), founder of RadicalxChange and co-author of Radical Markets, and Tomer Kagan (@Gradish), co-founder and CEO of Merit.

They discuss:

- What they’re working on in the space and how it will change how identity works in the future

- How to think about what makes up someone’s identity, including elements that are self-declared and those that can be independently verified

- Glen’s point that the internet is missing two crucial elements: a truth function and a dignity function

- How the world will be different if their projects succeed

- Pseudonymous identities

- The problem with large-scale identity or reputation systems, like the Chinese government or Uber have created

- Why blockchain is the wrong answer to the right question when it come to identity, and the idea that “most truth is local, not global”

- What they are still trying to figure out in the space

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Trae Vassallo (@trae) of Defy and Lee Edwards (@terronk) of Root Ventures.

They talk about:

- How their backgrounds and unique experiences have informed their perspectives on investing

- Whether venture capital should go back to funding technical risk

- Their advice for funds and how Trae has seen investing strategies come and go over time

- Why there are big opportunities in areas VCs don’t know much about, like logistics, warehousing, or agriculture

- Why Trae doesn’t differentiate between consumer and enterprise businesses

- Their requests for startups in the space

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Mike Elias (@harmonylion1), crypto consultant, joins Erik on this episode to talk about idea markets.

They discuss:

- How he came up with the idea

- Examples of how this could be implemented in the real world

- The problems with the incentives of the world’s media

- Why it’s “impossible to kill an idea with force”

- How an idea market is like a mix of the Nasdaq and Reddit

- Why, as a society, we want to search for the ideas that are both “outrageous and true”

- Why William James said that we should measure ideas primarily by their usefulness

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Alex Taussig (@ataussig) of Lightspeed, and Pete Flint (@peteflint) of NFX.

They talk about:

- The evolution of marketplaces over time, including a comparison of the characteristics of eBay and Lyft at the time they went public.

- Why the next wave of marketplace businesses will be in financial services, and why they require a unique team with a specific set of experiences.

- Examples of existing startups that are working in this space, as well as their requests for startups.

- The pros and cons of ISAs, and their potential impact.

- Conversational commerce, and why it didn’t live up to the hype.

- How healthcare and other heavily regulated markets might be be attacked by entrepreneurs.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Mike Maples (@m2jr) of Floodgate.

The talk about:

- The difference between fake growth and real growth, and how to know which one your company is experiencing.

- Why fake growth has taken hold in so many companies in the Valley, and its broader systemic causes.

- The difference between value hacking and growth hacking.

- Why once you’ve entered the growth stage, it’s next to impossible to go back to the value hacking stage.

- His thoughts on the Thiel vs. Rabois schools of markets.

- His tips for growing SaaS companies.

- How to think about incumbents.

- Why a pivot is not the same thing as a mulligan.

- The reasons for the fact that, in his opinion, there is too much money in VC.

- Why companies are staying private longer.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Alex Bangash (@AlexBangash), founder of Trusted Insight, joins Erik as part of our LP series.

They talk about:

- The myth, according to Alex, that there are such things as “good pickers” in venture.

- The fact that in venture, the traditional investment model is turned on its head — assets are picking managers, rather than the other way around.

- Why “the structural advantage of the big funds has all but disappeared” and why he cringes when someone tells him they want to be the next Benchmark.

- How he is trying to disrupt the entire venture model by democratizing access to capital.

- Why he’s bullish on the studio model and which kinks still need to be worked out.

- Where the next big thing in VC will come from.

- What he means when he says he’s “trying to bring a tennis racket to a basketball game” when talking about whether star GPs could be thought of as analogous to big NBA free agents.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Michael Kim (@MKRocks), founder and managing partner of Cendana Capital, joins Erik on this episode to talk about what LPs look for in venture funds and the future of the industry.

They discuss:

- The reasons for the proliferation of seed funds over the past few years.

- The rise of the "super angels."

- Why portfolio construction is so important to Cendana when they're looking at a fund.

- How he evaluates a fund to see whether their thesis can generate the right returns.

- Why he’s “not looking for the ETF of seed investing.”

- In which geographies they’re looking for emerging fund managers.

- The rise of YC and the economics of accelerators.

- What the next 5-10 years will look like for the industry, including whether there’s a “reckoning” ahead.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Erik is joined on this episode by Beezer (Elizabeth) Clarkson (@Beezer232), managing director at Sapphire Ventures, and Chris Douvos (@cdouvos), founder of Ahoy Capital.

They talk about:

- The state of the venture industry and the industry from the LP perspective.

- Why venture is “either all about access or audacity.”

- How LPs pick which funds to back.

- Whether there is too much capital in the venture capital asset class.

- What “dilettante capital” is and why there are more “clowns” in the industry than ever for whom lightning struck in the form of an outlier investment.

- The three main ways that venture funds are differentiated.

- Why succession is always a threat in venture and how good firms have been able to manage when a GP "calls in rich."

- Why a good venture firm operates like a basketball team and a bad one operates like a tennis team.

- The difference between building a firm and deploying capital.

- Some impromptu book recommendations of classic works on California.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell was our audio engineer for this episode and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this special live episode of Venture Stories, Bill Gates was interviewed at San Francisco’s Exploratorium by Julia Hartz, co-founder and CEO of Eventbrite.

We are honored to have Bill Gates, one of the most successful entrepreneurs of all time, among our small group of luminary LPs whose financial capital and engagement power the next wave of Village Global founders. 

They covered:

* Gates’s entrepreneurial journey starting Microsoft, including the most important turning points in the early years of the company.

* His thinking on work-life balance for founders and what he would do differently if he was starting again.

* His “greatest mistake of all time.”

* What he’s learned from the next generation of founders.

* His perspective on the current tech landscape.

* His views on philanthropy, global development, education, and much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This episode is a conversation between George Gilder (@ScandalOfMoney), author, investor, writer and economist, Patrick Stanley (@PatrickWStanley), head of growth at Blockstack, and Erik Torenberg, partner and co-founder of Village. It was originally released on The Stacks Podcast presented by Blockstack.

They talk about:

- Gilder’s Information Theory, and why it is central to everything, including the world economy and biology.

- Why Gilder says that “wealth is really knowledge,” why money is not wealth, and why using money as anything other than a measuring stick is one of the biggest economic problems of the past and future.

- The problem with the “morbid financialization of the world” and the fact that share buybacks financed by near-zero interest loans from the government have driven economic growth for the last several years.

- Why prices are just measures of time.

- The importance of community and how to measure it in a society and economy, as well as Gilder’s thoughts on the scourge of materialism.

- Why Gilder is skeptical of the potential world-dominating effects of AI and isn’t as concerned about privacy as others are.

- Gilder’s critique of the Bitcoin framework.

- What Gilder looks for in companies when he “puts his VC hat on.”

- The role of the fed, China’s unique economy, trade wars, debt, and the charter cities movement, and much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Sarah Guo (@saranormous), partner at Greylock. It was recorded live as part of a talk Sarah gave at Village Global’s Network Catalyst program in summer 2019.

They discuss:

- Which spaces Sarah is most interested in and where she has been investing

- Her advice for entrepreneurs looking to build a company in SaaS and enterprise, as well as her interest in companies working in security and privacy

- Her investment thesis at Greylock

- Why a company without an initial product is really just a story

- Her thoughts on the consumerization of the enterprise

- The product spec as an imagined future press release

- Her advice on pricing and mistakes that she sees entrepreneurs make when thinking about sales

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Howard Lindzon (@howardlindzon), GP at Social Leverage and co-founder and chairman of StockTwits, and Sheel Mohnot (@pitdesi), FinTech investor at 500 Startups.

They discuss:

- Which spaces they’re most excited about within FinTech.

- How the space has evolved over the last decade or so.

- Why it’s a very difficult and crowded space to try to build a company in (hint: “CACs are ridonculous”).

- Their takes on crypto and its future.

- Why incumbents like Google and Amazon have done a poor job in FinTech.

- Why Howard likes companies that have “weird angles of attack” into a market.

- Their thoughts on ISAs.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

David Friedman (daviddfriedman.com), economist and author, joins Erik on this episode. He is the son of Milton Friedman and the father of former guest, Patri Friedman.

They cover a lot of ground in this episode, including:

- The rationale for privatizing government and the failures of the existing system.

- What it would look like to have a fully privatized government, including how a private substitute for police and defense would work.

- Why he is not a utilitarian and the framework he uses to figure out what is right and wrong.

- How he would approach collective-action problems like global warming and nuclear proliferation.

- His perspective on inequality and his explanation for why people look to relative measures of affluence rather than absolute measures.

- How you would deal with punishment and criminals in a market-based society.

- And much more, including Glen Weyl’s Radical Markets, Tyler Cowen’s Stubborn Attachments, fake news, ISAs and restorative justice.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Noah Tye (@noahlt), developer and a very interesting thinker on Twitter.

They talk about:

- Noah’s advice on taking advice, including why “people give others the advice that they themselves need.”

- The importance of journaling and how to deal with emotions.

- Why he keeps an anticipation journal.

- The difference between burnout and overwork, and their relationship to depression.

- What it means to “shrink the quantum of experience.”

- What happened when Noah gathered a bunch of contrarians for a dinner party and how it informed how he views the roots of contrarianism.

- Why it’s important to be nice, contrary to the popular view of the “asshole genius” in tech.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik talks to Freyja (Jess), thinker on human coordination at the Twitter handle @utotranslucence.

They talk about:

- How we should think about the idea of “compassion at scale.”

- Why once a measure becomes a metric, it ceases to be an effective measure.

- Whether it’s possible to build a social system without coercion.

- The distinction between complex and complicated systems.

- Markets, and how they impact communities.

- Her “motivational Turing test.”

- What she would like to see changed about how education is structured.

- How we can be more positive-sum as a society.

- Why a group is not a group without an external threat.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Arnold Kling (@KlingBlog), economist and former web entrepreneur, joins Erik on this episode for a wide-ranging discussion of tech, politics, business and economics.

They talk about:

- Arnold’s mission to replace neoclassical economics, including his dissection of its flaws.

- How he would change how economics is taught, including his proposal for a better definition of economics than “the study of how to allocate scarce resources.”

- Why capitalism is not more popular, and his responses to what he says are the three main arguments against capitalism.

- Why Arnold says that new experiments in governance that attempt to start from the ground up are missing the importance of the insights embedded in the traditional way of doing things.

- How he would change government, taxation and other areas if he could wave a wand.

- Why countries over 100M typically have poor governance, and why he advocates for smaller units of government.

- His take on inequality and universal basic income.

- Who among prominent thinkers he agrees or disagrees with and why.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by James Gallagher (@jamesg_oca), publicly-traded person and researcher and writer in the income-share agreement space.

They discuss:

- What life is like as a publicly-traded person, including some funny stories from James's experiment.

- How one's incentives are transformed by having “shareholders” and how this arrangement creates value for everyone involved.

- The promise of ISAs to “leverage human potential at scale” and why they are a better replacement for debt financing.

- How ISAs could spread from post-secondary education to hospitals, law offices, primary schools, and beyond.

- James’s replies to some of the concerns expressed about income-share agreements.

- His requests for startups in the space.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Dani Grant (@thedanigrant) of USV joins Erik on this episode to talk about education. Dani has been doing a deep dive into education and shares a wealth of insights on how the current system works, its flaws, and the people working on new forms of education for all ages.

They talk about:

- Why the school system is broken and why it’s often thought of as “government-sponsored daycare.”

- How homeschools actually work, and how it is different than what you might think.

- Why religion was a precursor to organized education, and what insights it may have today for the future of education.

- The “free learning” movement.

- Her requests for startups in the space.

- How to address problems of inequality in new forms of education.

- How Dani (and Erik) might think about educating future children.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Karn Saroya (@karnsaroya), CEO of Cover, and Sheel Mohnot (@pitdesi), investor in FinTech.

They talk about…

* How Karn navigated the idea maze in starting Cover.

* The quirks of the insurance market and the real business model of big insurers.

* How insurance is comparable to prediction markets.

* Their requests for startups in the space, where the opportunities are, and what to stay away from.

* Why there has been a trend towards specialty insurance.

* How companies are using new sources of data to make underwriting decisions.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Mike Slagh (@MikeSlagh), co-founder and CEO of Shift, and Rahim Fazal (@rahimthedream), co-founder and CEO of SV Academy.

They talk about:

* How they “navigated the idea maze” to come to what they are doing today.

* How they are helping people with non-traditional backgrounds break into Silicon Valley.

* Why what they do is valuable both to the employer and the employee changing careers.

* How they came to their business models.

* How they help fix the “massive mismatch between supply and demand” in the job market.

* Their thoughts on ISAs.

* Other potential ideas in the space.

And much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this special live episode by Sarah Tavel (@sarahtavel), general partner at Benchmark. Sarah gave a fireside chat as part of Village Global’s Network Catalyst accelerator program in May 2019.

They talk about:

* The state of education and what Sarah is looking for in the space.

* Why founders need to focus on “getting one thing really right, no matter how big or small.”

* What Sarah sees in the crypto space and why she invested in Chainalysis.

* The promise of vertical marketplaces.

* Why Benchmark say “we are not in the business of predicting the future but rather of seeing the present clearly.”

* How she evaluates markets and some of the verticals that she’s looking at investing in.

* Company-building tips, including why as a company grows the CEO needs to “transition from CEO of the product to CEO of the system that builds a system.”

And much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Michael Mayer (@micjm), co-founder of Bottomless.

They talk about:

* Pseudonymous accounts on Twitter.

* Whether Twitter should be more ephemeral.

* The dynamics of Twitter and why people seek entertainment instead of facts.

* How to curate your Twitter feed.

* Why Michael says it’s the responsibility of high-profile people to be on Twitter and speak their mind freely.

* Whether college is valuable.

* Capitalism as a moral framework.

* Starting a company with a significant other

And much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Scott Page (@Scott_E_Page), professor at the University of Michigan and author of The Model Thinker.

They talk about:

* The idea of the wisdom of crowds.

* Why cognitive diversity is important for a wise crowd.

* Whether individual experts or groups of ordinary people make better predictions.

* Which mental models VCs should be using.

* Why Scott says “mastery is knowing when to use the right mental model at the right time.”

* Why, if you’re watching basketball, you may as well be watching people roll a die.

... and much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Deon Nicholas (@dojiboy9), founder of Forethought, and co-host for this episode, Village Global Network Leader Brianne Kimmel (@briannekimmel).

They talk about…

* How Forethought is “making everyone a genius at their job” through their artificial intelligence platform.

* How Deon navigated the idea maze and came to the idea for Forethought.

* Why customer support is a prime candidate for Forethought’s solution.

* Why Deon says that they aim to “augment employees, not automate them.”

* Lessons on sales, fundraising and recruiting.

* What the future holds for Forethought.

… and much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell was our audio engineer for this episode and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Matt Garratt (@mdgarratt), managing partner at Salesforce Ventures.

They discuss:

* Trends in enterprise software and enterprise investing, including voice, consumerization, and no-code.

* How their thinking has evolved over time and where they’re looking to invest.

* As a corporate VC fund, how to think about the potential for investing in companies that might come to disrupt the “parent” company.

* How their fund is enabling innovation in the enterprise.

* Why everyone seems to have “missed” Zoom.

* How the corporate development and venture teams interact at Salesforce.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Bee Shapiro (@BeeShapiro), New York Times columnist and founder of Ellis Brooklyn, and Natalie Toren (@NatalieToren), creative consultant.

They talk about:

* The current landscape in the beauty sector, including the clout of the massive incumbents and some of the up-and-coming brands.

* Whether successes like Kylie Jenner's line or Glossier can be replicated.

* How fragrance is unique from other categories.

* Where Bee would be investing if she was running a venture fund in the space.

* What distribution deals with big companies look like and what the economics are.

* Whether Silicon Valley tech entrepreneurs could take on the space.

… And much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Mike Duboe (@mduboe), investor at Greylock, Dan Hockenmaier (@danhockenmaier), of Basis One, and David Weinstein (@dw_stein), working on Special Projects at On Deck and TokenDaily.

They talk about…

* The history and different “eras” of growth as a standalone team.

* Why there’s been a shift in mindset towards growth teams, how they will change in the next 5-10 years, and why relentless optimization has backfired for some companies.

* Why you should think of user acquisition in terms of a loop rather than a funnel.

* Why onboarding is the point that determines whether a user will be retained or not.

* The fact that users acquired organically via word of mouth are much more likely to be retained than users that were acquired through paid channels.

* Why investors should ask themselves, “if you took away any non-organic acquisition, are you still excited about the business?”

* How to tell if a company’s growth is healthy and sustainable or not.

* Stories from the guests’ time working at Tilt, Thumbtack and Stitch Fix.

* The best structure for a growth team.

* Common misconceptions about growth.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Dan Held (@danheld), co-founder of Interchange. He was an early advocate of Bitcoin in San Francisco and is an influential writer in the space. Dan and Erik cover the history of Bitcoin, discuss some of Dan’s most interesting blog posts, and talk about what the future might hold for crypto.

Dan explains why Satoshi had a brilliant go-to-market strategy with Bitcoin. He talks about the reasons why various aspects of Bitcoin were set up the way they were, including the hard cap on the number of Bitcoin and why there is no set inflation rate.

Dan explains why mining takes so much electricity, and says that the walls around fiat money that would normally take the form of a vault are instead built virtually using that energy. He contrasts proof of work and proof of stake systems and talks about the trends in Silicon Valley’s perception of the space over the last several years.

They also talk about the future, including a discussion the Lightning network, whether micro-payments will take hold, and why there are so many projects with interesting ideas but without many users (and what might change that).

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Joey Krug (@joeykrug), founder of Augur and co-chief investment officer at Pantera Capital, joins Erik on this episode.

A year ago Joey was on the podcast to talk about the launch of Augur, a prediction market platform. In this episode Joey follows up on that conversation to talk about what he’s learned in the last year and to talk about the state of crypto in 2019 more generally.

They discuss the launch of Augur, how it has evolved over the last year and what’s next for the platform. Erik asks Joey what he’s changed his mind on in the past year and what his “requests for markets” are on Augur.

They move on to discussing crypto more broadly, including staking-as-as-service, the state of crypto investing, what he’s excited about in the space, Ethereum, DAOs, and Keynesian versus Austrian economics.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Tim O’Reilly (@timoreilly), Valley legend and founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media, and returning fan favorite Parker Thompson (@pt), partner at AngelList.

They start out talking about Tim’s piece in Quartz about the hazards of the view that scaling one’s company as fast as possible should be one's top priority above all else.

He says that this approach is not for every entrepreneur and that it’s an artifact of the amount of money floating around today chasing returns. He has a biting critique of the companies that are going public without having ever been profitable or cash flow positive — but more importantly, without having a plan for getting to that point.

Parker and Tim discuss the misalignment of incentives that can happen in venture capital, and some of the alternative models that are sprouting up to solve that problem. He gives his advice for what entrepreneurs should do when getting started and how they should approach raising money.

They also discuss policy changes that could lead to longer-term thinking by investors, whether Tim foresees a “Silicon Valley meltdown,” as well as why inequality is such a pressing issue and how to solve it.

We want to apologize for the audio quality of the second half of this episode. We ran into technical difficulties again during recording but are working on getting them sorted out for you.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Erik is joined by Jenny Rooke (@drjennyrooke), Managing Director at Genoa Ventures, and Jared Seehafer (@seehafer), Village Global Network Leader and CEO and co-founder of Enzyme.

They start out by talking about how Jenny got to where she is today and her career journey thus far. She explains what makes the team at Genoa unique and why it’s such a competitive advantage to have a team that is able to look at the raw data that a company is putting out and understand whether it’s compelling or not.

They define some commonly misused terms in life sciences and talk about how to differentiate between various areas of the space. Jenny mentions that part of being successful as a startup means choosing to stay focused and aggressively saying no to promising opportunities — and that Genoa follows the same advice.

Erik asks what some of Jenny’s requests for startups in the space would be, what her advice to aspiring entrepreneurs is, and which emerging technologies in the space are over- or under-rated.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Sean Linehan (@seanlinehan), Village Global Network Leader, and former VP of product at Flexport.

Sean explains how he found his way to Flexport, which he says was like “the TurboTax of customs brokerages.” He explains the trend of entrepreneurs building software companies that are not afraid to “get their hands dirty” in areas that involve a lot of people and logistics.

He talks about his study of the history of different industries and why he says that today is analogous to the early industrial revolution. He says that there is a trend of “productizing professional services.”

Erik asks which industries Sean would be most excited about if he was starting a venture capital fund together. Sean explains why he works as a product manager rather than a software engineer in the interest of maximizing his impact per unit of time and talks about why zero-sum thinking is pervasive in the world today but is in most cases, wrong.

We apologize for the audio in this episode and the last couple episodes. We had technical difficulties the day of recording, but we’ve got them fixed now and have some great episodes coming up for you.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Arjun Sethi (@arjunsethi) of Tribe Capital joins Erik on this episode to talk about Tribe Capital’s approach to investing. He talks about the “first principles” approach they take to evaluating companies and why he says rather than the company pitching their firm to Tribe, instead he tells prospective investments, “we will pitch you.”

He breaks down the data-driven analysis that Tribe does of the companies they look to work with, and talks about the kinds of data that work best for their analysis. Erik asks why the bigger venture capital firms aren’t taking the same approach and runs through a number of industries to get Arjun’s take on what the keys to success are in that sector.

Arjun talks about some of the writing on his blog over the past few years and points out that “any successful company is not successful because they have copied someone else’s framework.”

We apologize for the audio quality of this episode. We ran into technical difficulties during recording.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg.

Elad Gil (@eladgil), entrepreneur and investor, joins Erik and co-host Anuj Abrol (@nujabrol), Chief of Staff to Justin Kan, for a discussion of all things markets.

They start off talking about Elad’s philosophy of life and career in general, including why he says that “less happens than you think in 2 years, and more happens than you think in 5 years.” He points out that it’s hard to predict the future and says it’s impossible to say where he will be or what he will be doing 10 years from now.

Elad has a different way of looking at potential companies and investments than most investors. Rather than starting with the quality of founders, he starts by evaluating the quality of the market. He explains why this is important and how it has led to success for him as an entrepreneur and investor.

He talks about what makes a good market, and why “most startup markets have to be definitionally non-obvious.” They contrast the “Rabois School of Markets” versus the “Thiel School of Markets” and Elad gives his opinion on which markets are currently being ignored by Silicon Valley.

They finish with a rapid-fire round where they name a market and Elad gives his take on it, including VR, longevity, consumer social, and others.

Quotable Lines From This Episode

“Starting a company, at least for first-time founders, can really be an act of desperation.” — Elad

“Startups tend to fail at thing big companies are good at.” — Elad

“I see a lot of things done in professional services that should just be SaaS software.”  — Elad

We apologize for the audio quality of this episode. We ran into technical difficulties during recording.

Erik is joined on this episode by Ryan Delk (@delk), COO of Omni, and Jared Fliesler (@JaredSF), COO of Scribd.

They talk about the fact that Chief Operating Officer is a relatively new role in Silicon Valley that has emerged over the last several years. They explain how they make sure they are effective COOs.

They say that being COO is analogous to being a bumblebee in that a COO is always moving from place to place within the company making sure things are running smoothly. They use “how often am I surprised?” as a question to use to take the measure of how well they are doing their job.

They move on to talking tactics, including how to set up your org structure, how to think about recruiting in a growing startup, and the nuances of assigning titles in your company. They also discuss goal-setting within the company, performance reviews, the tough task of letting people go, and much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Michael Nielsen (@michael_nielsen), research fellow at Y Combinator Research, joins Erik for a wide-ranging discussion about a variety of topics, including:

* Why the top names in the S&P 500 change over time, but the top names in global university rankings don’t — and how to fix that.

* How Michael thinks about the role of risk in science, and why he'd like to see more risk-taking.

* Memory, including how to improve yours and why professional athletes seem to have such good ones.

* The “compliment deficit” in the world and how to fix it.

* The silver lining of the Bay Area housing problem.

* The reproducibility problem in social science.

* Why he’s a fan of chaos.

…and much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Auren Hoffman (@auren), former co-founder and CEO of LiveRamp and Tod Sacerdoti (@tod), former CEO and founder of BrightRoll. They are now working together on a new fund.

They talk about how they came to the idea they’re working on, including how to find the right intersection of ideas among those that are interesting to you, that you are uniquely skilled at, that others don’t yet appreciate, and that are worth working on.

They explain what data co-ops are and the unique value that they can bring. Auren says he believes that the future is about managing vendors rather than people, and points out that WhatsApp didn’t even build their core messaging functionality themselves in the first place.

Erik asks what’s changed in company building since they started their companies in the 2000s and what the next ten years will look like in venture capital. They also talk about why the Valley is flush with cash and whether they are long San Francisco in an era of distributed teams.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Ilya Sukhar (@ilyasu) of Matrix Partners and formerly of Parse, and Alex Yaseen (@alexyaseen), co-founder and CEO of Parabola.

They start by talking about what exactly “devsumer” is and why it’s important. They discuss some of the biggest names in the space and how these tools are enabling people who are not engineers to have the kind of leverage that engineers typically enjoy.

Ilya and Alex talk about the trends in the space and what they would be looking for if they were running a venture fund focused on devsumer. They discuss some of the common pitfalls founders face and some of the unique forces at play in this market. They talk about why people get excited about what they can build with the tools and how they intersect with some of the more developer-focused applications that exist.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Vinay Gupta, CEO of Mattereum, for a wide ranging discussion about crypto, world government, existential risks, science fiction, energy, and much more.

Vinay says that venture capital is a 40-year-old model and that the ICO boom — while having its own significant drawbacks — was a huge innovation in capital formation. He explains why the blockchain is such a huge innovation with wide-ranging applications and laments the fact that people have a hard time seeing past its application in digital currency.

He lays out his thoughts on why reputation systems are broken and why Facebook could in a few years’ time be essentially a credit rating agency and a digital identity system for all aspects of your life.

Vinay discusses the existential risks that the world faces today, and why the lack of environmental sustainability is at the top of his list of fears. He says that he is neither a Keynesian or an Austrian, but instead subscribes to “ecological economics.”

They also talk about the influence of science fiction on engineers, the idea of "network escrow," why we need a nerd in the White House, and novel ideas for generating energy.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Scott Heiferman (@heif), co-founder of Meetup.

They discuss the reason that IRL (in real life) meetups are important and why in-person contact cannot be replaced by virtual interaction. They talk about some of the most important communities that have started in the past, particularly involving religion, and why the connections they make have been so powerful.

Scott mentions the health benefits of belonging to a community and talks about the importance of network effects in building new groups.

He also talks about what makes a successful community and how people looking to build communities can make theirs grow.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Laura Behrens Wu (@LauraBehrensWu), co-founder and CEO of Shippo, and Talia Goldberg (@taliagold), venture investor at Bessemer.

They start out by talking about how Laura started Shippo and how the team iterated through different ideas to get to what the company is today. She tells the story of trying to get attention from investors for a space that was not too familiar to them.

Talia talks about Bessemer’s investments long ago in then-new retail companies like Staples and Dick’s Sporting Goods, and where they are thinking about where they want to invest.

They move on to talking about the rise of direct-to-consumer and consumer packaged goods, and discuss how companies like Shippo can help new entrepreneurs get to market. They discuss some of the changes in e-commerce over the years and how new channels like Instagram are helping create a new relationship between consumers and brands.

They also talk about companies that Talia wishes she had invested in but didn’t, their recommendations for entrepreneurs looking at the space, and their requests for startups.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik is joined by Miki Kashtan, author and NVC teacher. They discuss the problems of exchange in general as a way of fulfilling human needs, the issues with reciprocity, and what fulfilling needs via “flow” and “natural abundance” means.

Miki talks about some of the more interesting and unique studies that she has seen about societies from the very distant past and what kinds of lessons they may hold for how we should organize societies today. They talk about why in society we are always rationing, whether we realize it or not, and are usually determining how to allocate scarce resources by wealth rather than by need. Miki talks about the idea that shame was once a useful emotion that has been co-opted by the powers that be to keep people in line.

She also talks about the distinction between governments and governance, why we need to innovate on innovation, and why she never does anything for the money, but instead does things for the relationships.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Robert Greene (@RobertGreene), author of The 48 Laws of Power and The Laws of Human Nature, joins Erik on this episode to talk about how we can “penetrate the masks that other people wear” and become effective judges of others' character.

He calls his new book the “codebook for deciphering human behavior” and talks about why being able to look at something through the perspective of others is the most valuable thing you can do. He also says you need to combine empathy with a deep understanding of your mind’s tendencies and your personal psychological quirks.

Robert warns that you should take care not to be seduced by a glittery resume or by those who use their charm to hide their lack of competence. He also discusses the role of identity and the importance of reputation in today’s world, why everyone is an actor (whether they like it or not), and how he has evolved since his first book was published decades ago.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Tyler Cowen (@tylercowen), economist, author, and returning fan-favorite. He talks with Erik about why big business should be celebrated and why capitalism is effective but unpopular.

Tyler explains why he doesn’t quite believe that the main benefit of the firm is to lower transaction costs. He talks about why big business and capitalism have a branding problem, and what benefits they bring to the American people that mean they should be celebrated.

He talks about the tech behemoths and why concerns about their power are overrated, including why people don’t actually care as much about privacy as they say they do. He posits that users want more control over their information, not more privacy.

They discuss the vilification of finance in America, why Tyler says that corporate lobbying isn’t such a big deal in the US, and discuss how Tyler’s views differ from those of some of the most prominent writers on this topic.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Noah Smith (@Noahpinion), Bloomberg opinion writer, and Parker Thompson (@pt), partner at AngelList. They cover a wide variety of topics relating to, among many others, labor productivity, the gig economy, healthcare, education, solar power and the Green New Deal.

They start out by talking about productivity and why it hasn’t increased over the past decades, even though technology has in theory enabled higher productivity. Noah explains his pet theory that people waste the time they’re saving by being more productive via technology “dicking around on social media at work.”

They talk about certain sectors like real estate and wealth management ripe for disruption and where technology should result in better value for consumers. They discuss the gig economy and why Noah says it is not actually the future of labor. He points out people in Silicon Valley conflate companies that will make them very rich with companies that are going to take over the world (even though Silicon Valley insists they will).

They discuss why good government health insurance would be one of the best things that could happen for the American worker, and much, much more, including why workers should control a portion of the company they work for, why people have such trouble saving, and why companies aren’t investing in training or educating their workers.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik is joined by Stephan Kinsella (@NSKinsella), libertarian writer and patent attorney, Noah Smith (@Noahpinion), Bloomberg opinion writer, and Parker Thompson (@pt), partner at AngelList.

In a spirited debate, the three of them discuss the relative merits of Austrian economics vs. Keynesian economics.

They start out by defining the primary schools of economic thought and explaining where each of the guests sits on the spectrum of economic thinking. They talk about the value of empiricism when it comes to economics and whether economic theories can be derived from first principles.

They discuss inflation and whether centralized control of the money supply leads to better economic outcomes, as well as how one can determine these things in the messy real world. They also touch on a number of other topics, including whether it would be a good thing to get rid of the FDA and pharmaceutical patents, whether antitrust law is “unethical,” and whether the patent system is a net positive for society.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Zach Perret (@zachperret), co-founder and CEO of Plaid, and David Haber (@dhaber), former co-founder and CEO of Bond Street, now at Goldman Sachs.

Zach and David talk about how they met and how they started their respective companies. They explain how to find out whether you are passionate enough about an idea to start a company around it: are you passionate about it enough to be willing to pound the table to get your mother-in-law to invest?

David points out that 90% of your work as a founder is selling — to investors, employees, customers, and many others. They talk about the future of financial services and fintech and make some predictions about what to expect in the space over the next several years. David and Zach share some tips for people building a company in the space on what works and what doesn’t, and how the space has evolved since they started their companies.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Newt Bailey (@nmbailey), founder of The Communication Dojo, and a nonviolent communication coach, joins Erik on this episode to talk about how the framework of nonviolent communication can help you be more compassionate in your conversations and improve communication at work, and in all aspects of your life.

Newt tells the story of a protracted conflict at work that he was able to overcome with the help of NVC and how that was the basis for his work in nonviolent communication. He breaks down the three key skills in NVC and how it is similar to the martial art of aikido, where you are defending yourself without hurting the aggressor, and also not being an aggressor yourself.

He also talks about restorative justice initiatives based on NVC that are in effect around the world and explains how NVC can be compatible with the seemingly cutthroat world of business and economic growth.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This episode features Kim-Mai Cutler (@kimmaicutler) of Initialized Capital and Alex Danco (@Alex_Danco) of Social Capital.

They start out by talking about the huge rise in housing prices over the last decades in the Bay Area and the fact that there is now net-negative domestic US migration to the Bay Area. They discuss the reasons for this, including the fact that in California, property taxes are paid on the value of the property when it was purchased, not the market value.

They talk about land and property more generally and the fact that at one time in the past property was something that would produce something (like crops or livestock) as opposed to simply remain stagnant but appreciate in value.

They discuss the policies that have led to the housing crisis in the Bay Area and some of the current attitudes in the US towards housing that are counter-productive. They also talk about what would need to change for the housing crisis to abate, new forms of property rights, and why the financial crisis of the late 2000s didn’t fundamentally change anything about the overheated housing market.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Mike Maples (@m2jr), founding partner at Floodgate, and Alok Vasudev (@alokvasudev), early-stage crypto investor, join Erik on this episode.

They start out by talking about the biggest companies in tech and the discussion about whether they constitute monopolies. Mike points out the parallels between today’s uproar over big tech and similar eras in the past, including when Microsoft was said to be a monopoly that was “theoretically impossible” to break (until Google came along). They predict that crypto will be the next big wave in tech (and finance) and that it is the most likely thing to disrupt the tech giants of today.

They move on to talking in-depth about crypto, including what kinds of use cases will emerge in the next 5-10 years, why it’s in the government’s interest to see the crypto ecosystem thrive, and why the innovation in capital formation resulting from crypto will be at least as big as the innovation in tech that that will come from crypto.

They also talk about how VCs should think about the crypto space, why good governance is so important in crypto projects, and the changes that crypto will bring to the world in general.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Rebecca Kaden (@rebeccak46), investor at Union Square Ventures, Nikhil Basu Trivedi (@nbt), VC at Shasta Ventures, and Jonathan Yoni Regev (@jyonni), CEO and co-founder of The Farmer’s Dog.

They talk about where we are in the evolution of the consumer packaged goods space. Rebecca explains why this is a unique moment where consumers are eager to try new things from new brands. They discuss the three types of defensibility in a CPG startup and Nikhil points out that it’s difficult to figure out whether a business model can really be defensible at such an early stage.

Jonathan explains what they’re trying to do a The Farmer’s Dog and Rebecca and Nikhil talk about why they love the pets space for new investments, including some of the unique forces at play in the pet landscape.

They also talk about communities that have sprung up around certain CPG brands and how communities could be the future of both CPG and consumer social. They discuss the potential for another huge horizontal community like Snap or Instagram to emerge and what they would be looking for in “the next Instagram.”

We apologize for the quality of Jonathan’s audio.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Steve Schlafman (@schlaf), partner at Primary Venture Partners, and David Marcovitz, addiction psychiatrist at Vanderbilt University.

They talk about the opportunities and challenges facing startups looking to tackle mental health and substance use disorder. They tell Erik what they would focus on if they were building a company in the space and some of the different models for treating addiction that could be amenable to a startup.

The three of them move on to talking about some of the challenges in selling to employers, large health providers and state governments, and how those potential roadblocks affect their view of the best business model for startups in the space.

They also talk about some of their personal experiences with these topics as well as the macro-level changes over the last several years around mental health and substance use disorder.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Ryan Caldbeck (@ryan_caldbeck), co-founder and CEO of CircleUp.

Ryan starts out by explaining how he got started in CPG and the mission of CircleUp. He talks about why some VCs don't realize that the market is worth paying attention to and some of their biases when evaluating CPG opportunities.

He explains the data-driven approach that CircleUp uses to predict which companies will be most valuable and explains why a fund needs to have CPG as its only focus to succeed.

Ryan also opens up about his personal experience as a founder dealing with mental health challenges and talks about why it’s so difficult for founders, employees and investors in the startup ecosystem to be vulnerable about what they're facing. He discusses what he thinks needs to happen for mental health to be addressed properly by the Valley.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Dick Costolo (@dickc), former CEO of Twitter, joins Erik and co-host Jayni Shah (@shahjayni), in this special live episode.

Dick explains why is focusing on travel and tells some stories from a recent trip to Tanzania where he met with a hunter-gatherer tribe. He recounts what it was like trying to make it as a comic in Chicago alongside Steve Carrell and Tina Fey, and how the lessons he learned from improv apply to being a CEO.

He discusses polarization on social media, how it might be ameliorated, and regales us with stories from his days at Twitter.

He also talks about his theory of why digital fitness apps are not compatible with human nature, why you should use more exclamation marks in emails, and some of the most common mistakes that he sees the entrepreneurs he mentors making.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This episode features Ben Casnocha, Village Global co-founder and partner, in conversation with Cal Newport, author of Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World.

Cal starts out by defining what digital minimalism is exactly. He talks about why he refrains from using social media and explains how the mechanics of social apps create something resembling an addiction.

They discuss Henry David Thoreau’s philosophy of time management as explained in Walden, and why you should “think of your phone like the closet in the Marie Kondo show.” Cal explains why a 30-day reset is necessary and how exactly to use that time to find clarity around what is most valuable to you.

Cal talks about the kinds of offline activities that new digital minimalists start to engage in, his unique definition of solitude, and why solitude is so important.

They also give a sneak peek of Cal’s next book, on digital minimalism in the workplace.

Quotes From This Episode

“Minimalism says if you really want to maximize your quality of life, find the things that are really valuable, focus on those, and miss out on the things — not that are bad — but that are good but not that good.”

“The cost of the clutter is going to overwhelm the benefits that each of these things causing the clutter actually creates.”

“You can think about your phone like the closet in the Marie Kondo show.”

“Never before in human history could we get rid of every single moment of solitude in the day.”

“Clean out the proverbial closet and rebuild your digital life from scratch, but just do it much more intentionally.”

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

We were thrilled to host a Masterclass roundtable session with our founders and John Donahoe (@Donahoe_John), CEO of ServiceNow. Prior to ServiceNow, John was CEO of eBay for more than seven years. He is known as one of the most inspirational leaders in Silicon Valley and is a highly sought-after mentor to CEOs including Brian Chesky at Airbnb, Drew Houston at Dropbox, and Ben Silbermann at Pinterest. We’re honored to have him among our small group of world-class executives and collaborators whose time and expertise help power our network of founders at Village Global.

When we asked John to deliver a Masterclass to 12 diverse and determined founders in our portfolio, John gladly invited us all to the ServiceNow HQ where he riffed on topics of leadership, culture building, talent development, and how to grow as a CEO in the tech industry.

He shared advice on when to hire ahead, invest in and train, or replace personnel on your team and gave insight into his most common piece of advice on professional growth when advising CEOs. John also did an in-depth demonstration of how to let someone go with dignity and grace.

Quotes From This Episode

"When you talk about priorities at an aspirational level, they overlap a lot. People start realizing we're more similar than we're dissimilar." — John

"Adversity never feels fun. I don't seek adversity. But I'm no longer scared of adversity. When it emerges, instead of trying to run from it, I now accept that it is a reality and I say, 'well, at least I'm going to learn and grow.'" — John

"My experience has been that around any issue that involves change, you have roughly 20-25% of people who want to be part of it, no matter what the topic is, you have 25-30% of people who want to fight it, and you have the 50% of people in the middle saying 'which side is going to win?'" — John

"[When someone is let go] The fear is humiliation usually. That's almost a bigger fear than actually leaving the company." — John

"We're never as good or as bad as labels make us out to be." — John

"I would say in general, for every 10 hours of business development conversations, 8 of them are a waste." — John

"I do gratitude practice driving into work every morning. It's proven in brain science that your brain becomes more negative over time. But it's also been proven in brain science that you can counteract that." — John

"The older I get, the more I've made friends with uncertainty. I don't avoid uncertainty. Uncertainty is as present to me today as it was before but I'm a little more comfortable with it today." — John

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Eric Ries (@ericries) recently joined Village Global co-founder and partner Ben Casnocha (@bencasnocha) in San Francisco to chat with some of the founders of our portfolio companies. Eric is a Village Global LP, friend of the firm, and author of The Lean Startup: How Today's Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses.

Over the nearly 75-minute session, Eric gave a masterclass in Lean Startup techniques, addressed questions from founders on some of the finer details of the framework, and shared what he has learned from his entrepreneurial journey in the early 2000s as well as more recently as founder of the Long Term Stock Exchange.

Eric and Ben start out by talking about uncertainty as the core of a startup and the stark contrast between planning in an early-stage company versus in a large enterprise. Eric points out that those in the startup world take for granted certain startup best practices that “would get you fired in any big company.” He talks about the need for structure around entrepreneurial exploration, including making one’s hypotheses explicit and rigorously testing them.

Eric discusses the difference between customer discovery and customer validation. He tells the story of a founder who interviewed prospective customers and was told that the product was great and that they would use it, but that when he asked those same customers to put their name to a letter recommending their bosses purchase the product, not one would do so.

“The ideas that sound big are usually not the things that end up big.”

They move on to a discussion of pivots and why Eric says that in virtually all cases, after having pivoted, founders say they wish they had done so sooner. He explains why every six weeks is an ideal cadence for a “pivot or persevere” meeting.

MVP (minimum viable product) has become household term that was popularized by Eric. He discusses how founders can get over their fear of shipping something they perceive as incomplete and why he says the ideal MVP has “way fewer features than you think it needs.” He fields questions from Village founders on MVPs and talks about how small companies should think about their MVP when targeting large companies as customers.

“Engineers always think that more features will solve any problem.”

Eric explains what he means when he says that “entrepreneurship is a process of self-discovery” and why managing yourself and your own emotions as a founder can be equally as important as managing those of your team. He also addresses some of the criticisms of the Lean Startup methodology and common misunderstandings of the framework.

“I truly believe that entrepreneurship is a process of self-discovery. I think that two people working on the exact same company, encountering the exact same evidence, and deciding on a pivot, would probably choose two different pivots if they had different values. You discover something about what you really care about.”

Along the way, they discuss some of the seminal works in entrepreneurship, like The Four Steps To The Epiphany by Steve Blank and Crossing The Chasm by Geoffrey Moore.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Cyan Banister (@cyantist), partner at Founders Fund, and Niv Dror (@Nivo0o0), founder of Shrug Capital.

They start out talking about why they’ve each been successful investors and what their respective “superpowers” are. Cyan tells a story about hearing Chris Sacca talk about his fund on a bus and meeting Travis Kalanick in a hot tub. Niv talks about the playbook for micro VCs and why after suggesting as a joke that he start his own fund, he actually ended up doing so. In contrast, Cyan explains why she would never start a fund of her own.

Cyan talks about how the team at Founders Fund works together, how they hired Keith Rabois even though they thought they never would be able to, and what kind of talent they’re looking for.

They move on to some of the most exciting spaces in consumer social, including AR/VR gaming, virtual celebrities, live, and new applications that are enabled with AirPods.

They finish by talking about career development, why connecting people is such a valuable skill, and Cyan’s unique Twitter photo.

Quotable Lines

“I tend to be a listener, not a talker. I will sometimes be in a room or a party or an event and I hear what someone is working on and I say, hey, tell me more. With Chris Sacca’s fund, I heard him talking about it on a bus.” — Cyan

“Most people just try to shoot down things. I just want to believe and see what can be. I want to say yes. Pessimism is not very good in this business.” — Niv

“The thesis of the fund is things that I’m excited enough to talk about for an hour with a non-technical audience.” — Niv

“We are incredibly lean and nimble. When we want to get something done, it’s a small office, and we just pull whoever needs to be in a meeting into a meeting and it just happens and then it’s done.” — Cyan

“We probably wouldn’t hire Peter [Thiel] when he was just starting. He had to go do PayPal and all the other things that he did to become the Peter that he is today.” — Cyan

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Mark Goldenson (@goldenson), Village Global Network Leader, creator of VentureKit, and formerly founder and CEO of Breakthrough, joins Erik to talk about his requests for startups in the mental health space and in digital health more broadly.

Mark recounts his entrepreneurial journey so far, including his experience at Breakthrough, a mental health startup he created and ran that was later acquired. He talks about the four key problems in mental health and how connecting therapists and clients through the internet can solve those problems.

He explains how they tackled the problem in a unique way at Breakthrough and explains some of the nuances of operating in the health market. He points out that health is not a product-driven market and that at Breakthrough, instead of running a technology company as they had intended, they were running (virtual) clinics.

They talk about telehealth and what opportunities exist in digital health more broadly. He also lists some of his requests for startups, including the intriguing idea of a “Fitbit for mood.”

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Afton Vechery (@aaffttoonn), co-funder and CEO of Modern Fertility, and Anarghya Vardhana (@anarghya503), VC at Maveron.

Afton explains how she went from private equity to running a women's health startup and talks about the problems that she saw in the space and how Modern Fertility aims to change the lives of women.

Anarghya talks about their investing criteria at Maveron and what they're looking for in the healthcare space. They talk about the reasons that women's health has been neglected and talk about some of the startups that are working on changing that.

Afton points out that there are a number of companies working in healthcare that have a complete lack of articles published in peer-reviewed journals and Anarghya says that "brand is not enough" and that "you want to win the right way."

They discuss what their requests for startups are and where they would be investing if they were running a fund devoted solely to women's health.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Aline Lerner (@alinelernerLLC), founder of interviewing.io, and Tasneem Minadakis, Engineering Leader at Google and advisor to interviewing.io, join Erik to talk about recruiting software engineers and opportunities in the recruiting space more broadly.

Aline explains how interviewing.io allows for anonymous interviews, including the story of creating software to mask voices so neither side could tell who exactly the other party was. She talks about some of the correlations they found in their studies between the quality of a resume and likelihood of getting extended an offer, and whether the school you went to or companies you worked for are predictive of success in a job.

Tasneem talks about how they are working on they are working on changing recruitment process at Google and some of the insights she’s gained over the years in various organizations. They also talk about the unique dynamics of recruitment businesses, the potential for disruption in the recruitment space, and whether LinkedIn might be disrupted.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Blaine Hatab (@blainehatab), CEO of Distru, joins Erik to talk all about the cannabis space. He explains what he is doing at Distru, how he got into the business and why the cannabis space is ripe with opportunity.

He talks about the changes that have occurred in the market over the past several years with legalization in various localities and why that has led to a challenge for companies trying to comply with varying and changing rules. He discusses the different types of companies that exist currently, including his assessment of which ones will succeed and which will face challenges.

Blaine also talks about the wide variety of uses of the cannabis plant, including in industrial materials, and some of the potential changes to the market with more widespread legalization of recreational use.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Ron Bouganim (@ronboug), founder and managing partner at Govtech Fund.

Ron explains his thesis at Govtech Fund and how he got started in the space. He gives us a sense of just how neglected the technical operations of government are and why there are so many ripe opportunities in the space.

He talks about why traditional venture capital wasn’t interested in the deals he was sending his way and why he had to start his own fund. He paints a market map for us in the space and differentiates between civic tech and government tech.

He talks about some of his requests for startups, gives his advice for founders and talks about how government tech products can increase transparency in government around the world.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Jonathan Swanson (@swaaanson), co-founder and chairman of Thumbtack, and John Kobs (@johnkobs), co-founder of Apartment List join Erik to talk all about marketplaces.

John and Jonathan talk about their lessons from running their respective companies about what makes a good marketplace, and how prospective founders can find opportunities in the space. They break down what it takes to get initial supply and demand, and the merits of two-sided marketplaces.

They talk about some of the trends in real estate more broadly and the key limiting factors in marketplace businesses. They talk about their requests for startups in the space, where the opportunities are and what they would stay away from if they were a potential founder.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Ashu Garg (@ashugarg), partner at Foundation Capital, joins Erik for a primer on the marketing tech space. They talk about how Ashu got started in the space and Ashu discusses a blog post he wrote predicting that this decade will be the decade of the CMO. He says that marketing is key in the current business landscape, in the same way sales, finance and IT held that mantle in previous eras.

He talks about some of the big trends in marketing tech over the last several years, which ones are in vogue right now and what waves he expects in the future.

He also talks about his advice for founders in building a marketing tech company and which areas he would avoid.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Vincenzo Iozzo (@_snagg), Village Global network leader and director at CrowdStrike, as well as Jamie Butler (@jamierbutler), CTO at Endgame.

James and Vincenzo talk about where opportunities are in the space and what their requests for startups are. Vincenzo says that he’d like to see cybersecurity risk securitized to create financial incentives for companies to insure their operations against cyberattacks.

The two of them create a market map of the space and talk about the thesis they would have if they were running a fund in the space. They talk about where to avoid building and some of the nuances of the security market, including that there are rarely novel ideas, only great execution.

They also talk about how cryptocurrencies and blockchain are spurring developments in the space and the the reversal that is happening with data becoming more important than the code that it runs on.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Elaine Wherry (@elainewherry) joins Erik on this episode to give us the playbook for recruiting for your startup. Elaine was co-founder of Meebo and is now investing at Edelweiss VC (https://www.edelweiss.vc) alongside co-founder Lee Jacobs (https://www.leejacobs.co).

Elaine explains her superpower — being able to build quantitative systems around qualitative characteristics. She talks about how to evaluate candidates with your team and the way she uses TaskRabbit workers to calibrate her team’s assessment of a candidate. Elaine discusses why work simulations are so important in hiring and breaks down how you create a good simulation.

She explains why she asks behavioral questions exclusively in interviews. She tells founders that it's okay (and ideal) if they are spending more than half of their time recruiting. Elaine points out that an employee’s experience on the first day is the best predictor of the length of their tenure.

She talks about the “recruiter honeypot” that she set up — a fake profile on LinkedIn of a Javascript programmer. She looked at how recruiters approached it in order to potentially hire those recruiters to her company.

She also addresses some of the biggest misconceptions about recruiting and talks through how to deal with some of the thorniest aspects of managing people, including annual reviews, compensation, and having difficult conversations.

Quotes From This Episode

“The test of a work simulation is that any smart, well-intentioned person should fail that simulation.”

“[When interviewing someone] within the first five minutes, you have a tendency to have a reaction. It’s easy to fall into first impressions, but it’s your job to challenge that first response.”

“If people just want to get their review to find out whether they got their raise or their bonus, that isn’t going to be a great conversation, so my goal is to de-couple that.”

“People always seem to care more about where they stand in the organization than they do about where they stand outside the organization.”

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by returning guest, Simon de la Rouviere (@simondlr), co-founder at Ujo and ConsenSys, and Achill Rudolph (@AchillRudolph), lead link and initiator at Convergent.

They start with an introduction of what personal tokens are, how they work, and why they have the potential to empower people around the world. Achill explains how they are thinking about them at Convergent and how they’ve been used so far by creators.

Erik asks why blockchain is necessary for an application like this and Achill explains how they’ve been able to replace a long and complicated process with a one-click issuance of a personal token.

The three of them discuss the ideas and issues around trading personal tokens, whether derivatives and short-selling should be enabled, and what kinds of regulations should apply.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik and co-host Anuj Abrol (@nujabrol) interview Keith Rabois (@rabois), newly announced GP at Founders Fund.

Keith starts out by talking about why he joined Founders Fund and the reason that the structure of VC means we don’t see more people moving from one fund to another. They talk about the future of venture and whether there will be more M&A in the space and where he sees things going in the next 10 years. Keith explains why being an effective VC is much more an art than a science.

Erik asks about Keith’s goals at this point after all that he has already accomplished and why it’s thus far not been possible to scale one’s investing model beyond one’s self. Keith also has a well-known theory about breaking down businesses into equations and Erik asks whether one can do the same with careers as well.

Keith recounts the story of working for Reid Hoffman and Peter Thiel at PayPal and how he has learned to trust his instincts in the absence of specific quantitative metrics. He talks about why being vertically integrated is important for a startup, why getting the timing right is part of a founder’s job (and can’t be a founder’s excuse for failure), and why in his view founder quality trumps all other factors when evaluating a business.

He also talks about some of his requests for startups, including an integrated fitness and nutrition company. They also talk about some of the places where he agrees or disagrees with prominent thinkers in tech and how Keith’s politics and contrarianism have evolved.

Quotable Lines From This Episode

"You want to solve your biggest risks first. Mediocre founders solve the easiest risks first. Take the three most risky things and conquer them. I always counsel a founder to address risks in order of difficulty not in order of ease."

"To me when a founder says they didn’t get the timing right, that means they just didn’t do their job."

"I focus all on the people and a lot less on the market, a lot less on the product and a hell of a lot less on the technology."

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Justin Kan (@justinkan), founder of Atrium, Twitch and others, as well as Anuj Abrol (@nujabrol), Justin’s Chief of Staff and Erik's co-host for this episode.

Justin talks about the wisdom he’s gained over the past few years after selling Twitch and founding Atrium. He explains why it’s important to stay humble, not get too attached to any particular outcome for your startup and why he wishes that someone had told him ten years ago that no amount of accomplishment will create lasting happiness.

They discuss Atrium and the services for startups space more broadly, including some ideas for “Atrium for X” startups. He explains how he came to the idea for Atrium and why he raised funds for the company when he could have bootstrapped it himself. They also cover the fundraising process more broadly and why Justin insists he isn’t that great of an investor.

Justin also talks about his time as a “Snap star,” how Silicon Valley has changed, and what he’s learned from Paul Graham, Sam Altman, Michael Seibel and others.

Quotable Lines From This Episode

“I used to spend a lot of time thinking about, how I am going to be remembered and thought about and optimize the way people thought about me but I don’t care anymore. However you think of me today, as someone who's been an entrepreneur and had some success, maybe you think I’m really smart, it doesn't matter. In 10, 20, 50 years it will fade away and you probably won’t remember me at all. That’s okay, it’s just part of life.”

“Startups in general are a great vehicle for your own personal growth and development, to learn new skills, to learn what it’s like to lead a big organization, to see if you can do it — if you deserve to at all — it’s not a foregone conclusion.”

“You build up these castles in your mind about things that are going to bring satisfaction… none of those things will ever build any lasting long-term happiness. Even if you accomplish them and build a great reputation, it’s going to fade. The sooner you accept that, the happier you’ll be. I wish someone had told me that ten years ago.”

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik is joined by Christina Cacioppo (@christinacaci) of Vanta, and Amjad Masad (@amasad) of Repl.it.

They discuss the reasons why developers tools are for the most part “primitive” and the cause of the mess of different technologies and utilities that a developer needs to know how to use in order to create an app. They talk about the concept of “end user computing” and the progress that’s been made in allowing non-developers to do more and more sophisticated things that were previously restricted to developers.

Amjad explains how the way developer tools work can be traced back to the early days of computing with punch cards and Christina talks about why there has been a lack of venture investment in dev tools, even as developers and CTOs have seen a huge rise in their status within large organizations. They talk about the idea that new businesses either involve bundling and unbundling and why although some companies moan about the fact that their product is being used by hobbyists, they are in fact a powerful group of users.

They also talk about some of their requests for startups in the space, which areas they are most excited about, and whether everyone learning to code will be the future or not.

Quotable Lines From This Episode:

“There’s still this artifact coming from an era where computing time was more valuable than human time. We write code in a way that we appease the machine more than we appease the human and this is reflected in our tools and everything we do.” — Amjad

“Software engineering has this weird attribute where people believe in leverage and changing the world and then they put up with just such bad tools for themselves.” — Christina

“If you really think about it, our tools really suck. Being a software engineer is one of the highest leverage things you can do… yet we don’t really invest in the developer tools that much.” — Amjad

“It’s mostly been hobbyists that have driven computing.” — Amjad

“Look, should everyone have to learn what a static class is in different languages? I hope not. There are more interesting things to think about.” — Christina

“Most of the good work that happens, happens in low-hype periods.” — Amjad

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik talks to Andrew D’Souza (@andrewdsouza), founder and CEO of Clearbanc, and Ali Hamed (@AliBHamed), investor at CoVenture, recurring guest and fan favorite.

Andrew breaks down how Clearbanc works, why now is a unique time to build a new model of funding, and how they are using quantitative metrics in a business that has typically relied heavily on qualitative factors. He says that he would like to see venture capital go back to funding technical risk, and that for a lot of companies raising equity, 50-80% of their equity is going to Facebook and Google (via ad buys).

He explains how Clearbanc is able to plug in to a startup’s finances to model and keep track of their progress in real time. Ali says that he would like to see founders taking the right kind of capital for their company's needs and talks about some of the perverse incentives in venture. Andrew points out that Clearbanc wants and needs all of their companies to succeed, which isn’t always the case in venture.

They talk about the moment that consumer goods are having and some of the insights Clearbanc has gleaned from amassing a ton of data via their investments in a ton of CPG companies. He says that because Clearbanc invests based on a company's metrics and not factors such as where the founder went to school or via introductions, they (without a mandate) have invested in 8X as many female founders as traditional VC.

Finally, Andrew and Ali talk about how the funding landscape will evolve in the coming years, including what the big VC firms will do, what the aspirations for Clearbanc are, and whether tokens can be an effective form of financing.

Quotable Lines From This Episode:

"My perfect utopian future is: all of the money that’s in venture capital goes to solving truly hard problems. Instead of MBAs running spreadsheets trying to figure out CAC to LTV, they’re funding companies that are trying to cure cancer, develop flying cars, extend life, get us to the moon… Those are the outsized bets that equity is uniquely designed to fund." — Andrew

"We have to get out of our heads the idea that the only types of capital in the world are seed, series A and series B rounds and start thinking about: what’s the type of capital that’s right for this situation?" — Ali

"I would love to see venture capital go back to funding technical risk. I would hope that people go back and look at 2018 and 2019 and say I can’t believe that founders sold 50-80% of their companies before IPOs to pay for Facebook and Google ads. You’re basically selling 50-80% of your company to Facebook and Google." — Andrew

"Venture capital branded itself really well, right? You have these really smart people who put together these fancy websites and basically said that if you raise from XYZ firm, you’re going to be successful. We just sort of glamorize the whole asset. It’s so fascinating that venture capital figured out a way to turn their capital into not a commodity. But it was this false promise. It’s caused a lot of people to take on a lot of capital that they otherwise wouldn’t have because of the social validation." — Ali

"Imagine if in the public markets investors said, ‘you should give me shares in GM at a lower rate because I’m such a good investor.’ VCs are intuiting a sort of causation and saying ‘hey, because I invested in Uber, it turned out to be great, rather than saying, hey, I was able to get into Uber and it was great.’ The promise of value-add from VCs often doesn’t materialize and when it does, its something that you could probably get from independent advisors, and other people. It probably doesn’t warrant the cost of that equity." — Andrew

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Anda Gansca (@agansca), co-founder and CEO of Knotch, an independent content intelligence platform for marketers.

Anda starts out by explaining the shift in the marketing world to content, the story of Knotch, and why the company has been in a great position to take advantage of that trend. She says that display advertising, including banner ads, outdoor advertising and television ads, are “basically ineffective.”

She takes us behind the curtain of marketers and advertisers at major brands to tell us how they think about where to spend their money. Knotch moved from Silicon Valley to New York City to be closer to their customers and Anda explains how she made that decision and why. She talks about why blockchain in advertising doesn’t really make sense and why she thinks escaping the echo chamber in Silicon Valley helped them focus on what really matters.

Anda walks us through a market map of marketing tech and talks about why “ad tech” as a sector has been written off by many VCs. She also explains what their ultimate vision is for Knotch — to give back control of ad data to consumers and talks a bit about what she expects when it comes to GDPR-style regulation in other areas of the world.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by his co-host for this episode, Brianne Kimmel (@briannekimmel), investor, advisor and Village Global network leader. They talk to Christoph Janz (@chrija), investor at Point Nine Capital, a Berlin-based early stage venture capital firm focused on SaaS and digital marketplaces.

Christoph lays out their investing thesis at Point Nine and talks about why they are geography-agnostic when it comes to potential deals. He explains at which stage they like to invest and some of the difficulties in evaluating early-stage SaaS companies.

The three delve into some of the more successful SaaS companies from the past few years and use them as case studies to talk about how to evaluate an early-stage product, team and sales strategy. He discusses why they invested in Zendesk and Typeform, and why he sees product and branding as very important at an early stage.

They discuss some of the merits of SaaS companies that are working in specific verticals and in the enterprise, as well as why being a “SaaS company” is no longer as significant a distinction as it once was. They also talk about when a startup should be focusing on sales and whether it’s even possible to hire the VP of sales that a founder dreams of in a small SaaS company.

Articles Mentioned In This Episode

Jason Lemkin: The 48 Types of VP, Sales: https://www.saastr.com/the-48-types-of-vp-sales-make-deadly-sure-you-hire-the-right-one/

Christoph Janz: There’s More Than One Path To $100 Million: https://christophjanz.blogspot.com/2018/12/theres-more-than-one-path-to-100-million.html

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Brad Hargreaves (@bhargreaves), founder and CEO of Common and co-founder of General Assembly, and Zach Aarons (@ZacharyAarons), co-founder and partner at MetaProp, a proptech venture fund.

The guests explain what exactly proptech is and why it’s an exciting space for entrepreneurs. They go over some of the sub-segments within proptech, some of the existing unicorns in the space, as well as the incumbents that new entrepreneurs might encounter and how they themselves getting involved in the crossover of tech and real estate.

Brad explains how his time at General Assembly informed Common and how he “navigated the idea maze.” He points out that there are a lot of adults living with non-family roommates but that virtually none of the existing structures in real estate and property management are set up for that arrangement.

They discuss the differences between residential and commercial real estate and why “they’re almost like separate industries." WeWork has even had trouble trying to add residential to their existing commercial business.

They also talk about some of their requests for startups in the space and the unique structure of new investment vehicles, given that they are investing in both operating companies and real estate assets and receive returns on each of those investments in the same fund.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Bradley Tusk (@bradleytusk) joins Erik on this episode to talk about the intersection of politics and tech. He’s founder and CEO of Tusk Ventures and author of The Fixer: My Adventures Saving Startups From Death By Politics. He’s also a philanthropist, political strategist, and hosts his own podcast, Firewall.

Bradley has worked with Michael Bloomberg, Chuck Schumer, Uber, and many others. He shares the lessons he’s learned throughout his experience both working in politics and helping guide startups through the political and legislative processes. He explains the psyche of politicians and says that the actions of virtually every one is guided by whether it increases or decreases the chances of winning their next election.

He talks about his work with Uber and how grassroots campaigns on behalf of startups with fervid customers can sway politicians to change existing regulations that tend to benefit entrenched interests. He discusses some of the best policies that legislators can implement to benefit startups and innovation and talks specifically about some of the areas that involve the overlap of governance and tech, including charter cities, co-living, and income-share agreements.

He also talks what Silicon Valley misunderstands about politics, whether a Silicon Valley candidate could run in 2020, and how he is trying to increase voter participation through his foundation’s work on mobile and blockchain-powered voting.

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Quotable Lines From This Episode

“Every single politician I’ve ever worked with, with the exception of Mike Bloomberg, is solely motivated by the next election, and if you can do something that makes them think they’re going to lose the next election, or that you can do something to make them win the next election, they’re going to do what you want — and if you can’t do that it doesn’t matter what you want.”

“It’s especially hard with crypto and probably harder than any other sector — how do you regulate this thing that by design is meant to avoid federal currencies, avoid sovereignty, avoid nationality and is a reaction against all that?”

“The vast, vast majority of politicians, to be blunt, are desperately insecure, often self-loathing people who can’t live without the validation of holding office and running for office and they will do anything to fill that hole in their psyche.”

“In my experience, the vast majority of journalists are just curious people who are trying to figure out in any given situation. Where people get into trouble is in trying to spin them.”

“People in the Valley tend to not know what they don’t know, meaning that because they are very intelligent and because they have had success in some areas in life, they assume that that is applicable to everything they can do.”

“Politics is its totally own world, totally own world language, totally own set of norms, and just because you were a really good engineer or you figured out how to market a product that you could figure out politics too, that’s an incredibly dangerous assumption.”

“The naiveté of people in the Valley in thinking that just because they attend political fundraisers and write checks that they have some level of understanding or influence over the process. They have none.”

“There’s no one in the Valley at the moment who could plausibly be a presidential candidate in 2020.”

“You look at issues in this country like guns or immigration or healthcare or climate change, most polls show that 70% of people agree on the basic tenets of what to do about this stuff, and then there’s about 15% on either side that disagree but unfortunately right now the 15% on either side are the people that vote in primaries, so they really call the shots.”

____

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Scott Belsky (@scottbelsky) joins Erik to talk about his new book The Messy Middle: Finding Your Way Through the Hardest and Most Crucial Part of Any Bold Venture. Scott is Chief Product Officer at Adobe and was CEO and co-founder of Behance. He’s also an early stage investor.

Scott discusses his experience founding, scaling and selling Behance, then working as a venture capitalist, early stage investor and as CPO at Adobe. He talks about what he means by “the messy middle” and talks about the three stages of “navigating the volatility” of the messy middle.

He points out that the mission of the company is not going to keep you engaged eternally and that you need to “hack the reward system” instead. Erik asks how to know whether to quit or keep going and what some of the lessons he learned as an early stage investor are. Scott talks about the crucial importance of honesty and candor among team members and the self-awareness required to decide what one’s next career move should be.

He explains why running a company can be like driving a van with all your team members, but with the windows blacked out — requiring you as leader to keep your team up to date on what is going on and narrate to them where you are as a company. He also talks about the hidden benefits of friction in a company, why when starting a company you should focus on empathy for users rather than passion for solving a problem, and the techniques he uses to remains productive.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik sits down with Donnie Dinch (@donnie), Michael Galpert (@msg) and Greg Isenberg (@gregisenberg), to follow up on the projects they were working on a year ago when they all got together at the end of 2017 to talk about consumer social on one of our first podcast episodes. They discuss what’s changed since then and what they see ahead in the consumer social landscape.

They discuss some of the unexpected twists and turns their ventures took over the course of 2018 and some of their lessons learned from the year. They talk about some of the trends that emerged during 2018 and which ones they expect to come in the year ahead. Greg points out that the big players in the space are distracted and a lot of people have given up on the space, so opportunity is ripe. He says “there have never been fewer people working on consumer social than in 2019.”

They talk about where they think the next unicorn in consumer social will come from and what some of the most promising existing companies are, as well as some of the ideas they’d like to see built. They go deep on a number of trends, including audio as a medium of communication, the crossover of games and consumer social, and social fitness.

The four of them also talk about why Apple is in such a good position to build something great in social (but that they never will) and play “long-short,” where Erik names a company in the space and they say whether they’re long or short and why.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik talks to longtime friend and co-author of No Hard Feelings: The Secret Power of Embracing Emotions at Work, Liz Fosslien (@fosslien / fosslien.com). She talks about the importance of “feeling your feelings” and not running away from them, especially at work. Liz gives some practical tips on how to give good feedback, how to approach negotiating, and how to be a good boss.

She talks about the difference between diversity, inclusion and belonging, why it’s so important to strive to make people feel like they belong and how to do so (tip: learn how to pronounce *everyone’s* name, not just the easy ones).

Erik asks how her own experience led her to these insights and how she’s able to find humor in the workplace. She also explains why not being so passionate about your job is actually a good thing, why you should stop feeling bad about feeling bad, and how to acknowledge your anxiety and move on.

Quotable Lines From This Episode

This traditional notion that you should be able to check your feelings at the door when you enter the office is ridiculous, and given that we are going to have emotions at work, it’s time we learned to deal with them.

Envy’s actually a really useful emotion — it really reveals what we value. If you’re jealous of someone, don’t perform all kinds of mental gymnastics to make that go away, try and really figure out what that person has that’s making you jealous.

As a manager, it’s almost as important to manage your emotions as it is to manage other people.

___

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik is joined by Matt Mullenweg (@photomatt), founder of Wordpress and Automattic, as well as Andreas Klinger (@andreasklinger), VP of Engineering at CoinList and a founding team member of Product Hunt (along with Erik).

At Automattic, Matt works with over 850 employees working remotely in 70-plus countries. The three of them discuss the benefits and drawbacks of a distributed team, and why it is the future for knowledge work. Matt explains his quote that “every company over 100 people is already distributed, they just pretend they’re not.”

They talk about some of the best protocols for managing distributed workers and why being able to pull from worldwide talent is such a big advantage. They mention that Invision, a large and successful company with distributed workers, requires everyone to work on Eastern Time. Matt points out that they don’t use email at Automattic and instead use their own custom tools. They also talk about some of the modifications to current collaboration tools that they’d like to see.

The three of them also talk about why many of the “issues” surrounding remote work are not actually issues unique to remote work but are part of knowledge work in general. They also discuss some of the challenges of remote work, including ensuring clear communication, gauging the quality of potential hires without the usual local signals, and dealing with distractions.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode, Erik is joined by Jd Ross (@justindross), co-founder of Opendoor. They talk about a wide variety of topics, including mental models, cities, governance, travel, founding myths, and “why all of us are solely responsible for western civilization.”

They start with mental models, talking about some of the most useful mental models Jd has seen and how he identifies new ones (a mental model for mental models, if you will). They transition to talking about cities and governance, including why the Bay Area has a housing crisis, why Jd is very long on Oakland, and the policies that he would import from the UK to fix housing in the Bay Area. Jd observes that cities always endure, even through disasters and massive changes in the nation states surrounding them.

He talks about founding Opendoor, the importance of founding myths, and what he’s learned from Keith Rabois. He explains what you need to scale your company effectively and the difference between entrepreneurs and executives. He talks about some of his mental models for company building and why he says “playbooks rule everything around me.” Jd also talks about taking a sabbatical and traveling around the world twice, but in his words “learning nothing.”

They talk about what Jd is looking for in his next opportunity and how he thinks about what to pick. He says that he’s looking at how to create the most good for the human race over a 1000 year time horizon and explains how Carroll Quigley convinced him that all of us are solely responsible for western civilization. They talk about snark as a contagion in the world today, which Jd says emerges when people don’t feel empowered to make changes, so they fall back on sarcasm.

They have a rapid-fire round where they talk about different people that Jd has learned from, and also play a game of long-short, where Erik names something (fitness cults, the Bay Area, etc.) and Jd says whether he’s long or short on it.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Jesse Genet (@jessegenet), co-founder and CEO of Lumi. Lumi is an online platform that handles all of the packaging needs for direct-to-consumer companies. Jesse explains what the typical process for procuring these types of supplies why even huge companies like Amazon still have to navigate a maze of relationships with various brokers and suppliers to fulfill their packaging needs. She compares buying a plane ticket prior to online aggregators to the current state of supply chain procurement.

Jesse explains how she got into the space and talks about the importance of beautiful packaging to companies that, without retail stores, otherwise have very few touch points with a customer. She describes the emergence of a stack of services to serve direct-to-consumer companies and lets us in on some of the ins and outs of the hidden world of supply chain management. She also talks about the consumer goods space in general and what insights she’s gathered on what makes a successful consumer packaged goods company.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Grace Chen was our audio engineer for this episode and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik is joined by Antonio Garcia Martinez (@antoniogm), author of Chaos Monkeys, and Parker Thompson (@pt), partner at AngelList. Parker is a returning fan-favorite. Erik describes Antonio’s Chaos Monkeys as half Michael Lewis of Silicon Valley and half Hunter S. Thompson. It's a great read.

Parker and Antonio debate whether the corrosion of discourse and the rise of fake news are a result of specific features of social media, like the News Feed, or whether they are a result of humans being interconnected instantly via smartphones. Antonio argues that WhatsApp is “the perfect foil to Facebook” but that it is still a distribution platform for fake news.

They discuss why two people can see the same high-quality video of the same event, but still draw opposing conclusions on who was the “victim” and who was the “perpetrator.” They discuss the need for media literacy, the difference between media and journalism, and how Twitter and Facebook might be fixed.

They talk about the change in sentiment about social media on the left and the right through the years, starting with the election of Obama, through the Arab Spring, to Trump. They also discuss moral relativism between the US's political parties and the dichotomy of Bay Area political views.

The three close with a discussion about the religious instinct that seems to be an innate part of the human psyche, even if it doesn’t always manifest via organized religions. They talk about new manifestations of religion in today’s social movements and talk about the crazy fact that there are actual “religious startups” that pitch new churches to "VCs."

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Political Ideology Diagram Mentioned By Parker

https://twitter.com/hamandcheese/status/991408394941665285

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Books and Articles Mentioned In This Episode

The Image: A Guide to Pseudo-Events in America by Daniel Boorstin

The Revolt of the Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium by Martin Gurri

Amusing Ourselves To Death by Neil Postman

Seven Types of Atheism by John Ray

Marshall McLuhan’s Playboy Interview in 1969: https://www.nextnature.net/2009/12/the-playboy-interview-marshall-mcluhan/

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Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories, Erik is joined by Yunus Saatci, of Uber AI labs and a founding member of OnDeck, and Lewis Gyson, founder and CEO of Ant, a Village Global portfolio company. They were interviewed recently in downtown San Francisco.

Yunus talks about the unique career he's had so far, with stops at big tech companies as well as in venture capital. Lewis explains what he and the team at Ant are trying to do and how his experience working for New Zealand's version of eBay (New Zealand and China are two countries where eBay doesn't operate) helped inform what he's working on now.

They break down some of the most commonly used (and overused) terms in artificial intelligence, including machine learning, deep learning and others, and explain how those techniques work. They also talk about the relevancy of academic machine learning techniques to commercial applications and why machine learning is called "a solution in search of a problem."

They talk about some of the ways that AI can transform brick-and-mortar retail and direct-to-consumer, and all the advancements in retail that a company like Ant can provide when it comes to supply chain management, delivery, and point-of-sale. They also discuss big companies in AI and their motivations in making AI tools open source.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik is joined by Vijay Boyapati (@real_vijay), a returning guest who was previously here to talk about Bitcoin and crypto from an Austrian perspective. Today he’s here to talk about healthcare from the Austrian perspective. He breaks down the causes for the dysfunction in the US healthcare system as he sees them and talks about what (if anything) might fix them.

They discuss the factors that are distorting incentives in healthcare and why they result from a lack of free markets. Vijay talks about employer-sponsored healthcare that emerged during World War Two, which has remained the default system “by accident” ever since. He also talks about Medicare and farm subsidies and how those have contributed to consumers paying more but getting less when it comes to healthcare.

Erik asks what Vijay would do if he could wave a wand and change anything about the US healthcare system, but Vijay says that it might take a collapse of the system to change how things work. Vijay talks about why the US system is still superior to single-payer healthcare systems around the world and why he would look to Singapore as an example of a country that the US could learn from. They also discuss the Austrian and libertarian perspectives on governance and monetary policy more broadly.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Quotable Lines From This Episode:

“The cost in single-payer healthcare systems is the wait. I’d rather live somewhere where the treatment is available even if it is expensive.”

“Ask a doctor delivering a baby, ‘how much does this cost?’ They can’t tell you because they don’t know. This is the only industry where a provider has no idea what their service costs.”

“Insurance is supposed to be for unexpected catastrophic events, so it’s strange that we use it for all these routine healthcare procedures.”

On this episode, Erik is joined by Renata Quintini (@rquintini), partner at Lux, and Brian Frank (@bfrank), early stage investor and advisor to food tech companies.

They start out by talking about what food tech really is, why it’s exciting, and what some of the coolest companies in the space are doing. Brian points out that food is an 8.1 trillion dollar market worldwide, and that the industry is “all up for grabs.” They discuss what it takes for new entrants to get into the market and some of the advantages and disadvantages that the massive incumbents have.

They discuss trends in the industry, including mechanization and automation, artificial intelligence, the demand for plant-based and organic food, and the newly health-conscious consumer. Renata and Brian talk about some of their investments in the space. They break down what new entrants in the space need to do to get in front of customers and talk about some of the data advantages that direct-to-consumer companies have that incumbents don’t.

Erik also asks what kinds of opportunities they see in the space, what their requests for startups would be, and what kind of company they would be founding if they were an entrepreneur rather than an investor.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik is joined by his fellow general partner at Village Global, Ross Fubini (@fubini), and Misha Esipov (@mishaesipov), co-founder and CEO of Nova Credit.

Ross and Village are investors in Misha’s company and Ross has been obsessed with fintech for a very long time. Misha tells the story of how his team came upon the idea and why the mission of the company has been resonating with the founding team and subsequent hires. He explains why credit reports are not shared between credit rating bureaus in different countries, making it really difficult to get a credit card, a loan, or even just an apartment, as an immigrant.

Misha talks about going from a three-person founding team to where they are today and what kinds of learnings he has gathered along the way. He talks about the importance of hiring a general counsel and starting with smaller customers before bigger ones. Ross says he’s excited about how big Nova Credit could get and explains what he means when he says he likes to see entrepreneurs “own the whole problem.” Erik also asks about their requests for startups in the space and what kinds of companies they would be looking to invest in if they were running a fintech fund.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode, Erik is joined by Deepen Parikh (@deepenparikh), partner at Courtside Ventures.

Deepen explains how Courtside Ventures came to be and the thesis behind the fund. He breaks down the four areas where Courtside invests — all of which involve sports. Dan Gilbert, owner of the Cleveland Cavaliers, is one of Courtside’s LPs, and Deepen at one time worked for a family office that was looking to purchase a pro sports team — so Deepen knows a lot about the space.

Erik asks whether sports can really be a venture backable business and where the opportunities are to be in on the ground floor of a new sport and sports league, like UFC, competitive gaming, or drone racing. Deepen shares a number of interesting insights on the economics of professional sports and talks about the idea that “non-helmet sports generate bigger personalities.”

Deepen also talks about some of the transformations we can expect in the sporting world in the next decades, some of his requests for products in the space, and how people will consume sports in ten years.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by Amir Bandeali (@abandeali1), co-founder and CTO of 0x, and Ivan Bogatyy, general partner at Metastable Capital.

Erik and Ivan ask Amir about the background behind 0x and its creation. Amir says that 0x is a protocol, rather than an exchange. He also breaks down how a decentralized exchange is different from a centralized one. Amir predicts that "in the long run the types of assets that are going to be tokenized are mostly non-financial assets."

Amir says that market makers want to port the paradigm of a centralized exchange over to decentralized exchanges, and talks about what kinds of ideas from a centralized exchange could be useful in a decentralized exchange.

They talk about the problem of front-running and how to prevent it. Amir breaks down some of the most common misconceptions about decentralized exchanges and talks about some of his requests for products in the space. They also cover automatic market makers and derivative protocols.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

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Further Reading:

Can centralized exchanges push DEX adoption? https://messari.substack.com/p/dex-appeal-messaris-unqualified-opinion-10

Front-running, Griefing and the Perils of Virtual Settlement (Part 1)
https://blog.0xproject.com/front-running-griefing-and-the-perils-of-virtual-settlement-part-1-8554ab283e97

Announcing the launch of 0x protocol v2.0! https://blog.0xproject.com/0x-protocol-v2-0-is-live-183aac180149

DEX vs. EX https://messari.substack.com/p/dex-v-ex-unqualified-opinions-21

Frontrun.me http://frontrun.me/

Erik is joined by his co-host for this episode Ray Batra (@reesesandcoke), founder of Shift_Up, a platform for in-person learning that Ray calls “gyms for learning” and Austen Allred (@AustenAllred), co-founder and CEO of Lambda School, a pioneer in the income-sharing space. Their computing science program is free until a student gets a job, at which point they pay back their schooling with a percentage of their income (up to a capped amount).

By the way, we apologize for the audio quality of this interview. We had to catch up with Austen over the phone while he was on the move between meetings.

Austen talks about some of the other verticals that Lambda School is thinking about beyond computer science, and why they are also looking at taking care of other things in a student’s life like housing and bridge income. He points out that in addition to requiring a significant amount of capital, education just as importantly requires time and space and a clear head.

They talk about Austen’s quote that Lambda School is an education company disguised as a hedge fund. He says that less than 10% of people are at their true economic potential, and that Lambda School is a large-scale bet that human capital is mispriced all over the place.

Austen and Ray debate the merits of in-person versus online schooling and what the benefits and drawbacks of each are. Austen talks about what makes Lambda School unique and how they’ve designed the program to optimize for success. Erik asks whether higher education is a bubble and Austen says it inarguably is — the only question remaining is whether it will pop or simply deflate. They discuss some of the incentive problems around higher education as well.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined on this episode by John Robinson (@RohnJobinson), president and COO of 100 Thieves, and Blake Robbins (@blakeir), partner at Ludlow Ventures.

Blake and John talk about how they got into eSports and what excites them most about the space. They run through some of the unicorns in eSports and the venture firms that saw their potential early. They also discuss how big companies like Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook are or are not getting involved in the space.

The three of them compare and contrast traditional sports leagues, athletes, brands and teams with those in eSports and talk about how the revenue streams differ in eSports versus those of traditional sports. They talk about the applicability of a single team like 100 Thieves across a bunch of different games, comparing it to having a Yankees team in every sport, instead of just baseball.

They mention that contrary to traditional sports, there is something to watch 365 days of the year for fans of an eSports team. They also say that the space is getting more attention as billionaires notice their kids are more excited to meet Ninja (a high-profile gamer) than Michael Jordan or LeBron James.

They finish with some of their requests for startups in the space and Erik asks what they think the future holds for eSports.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik is joined by Ooshma Garg (@ooshma), CEO of Gobble, and Micah Rosenbloom, (@micahjay1) partner at Founder Collective.

They talk about big changes in the food landscape over the past several years. Ooshma points out that people in Silicon Valley often underestimate just how massive the food space is until they realize how many component parts it has. They discuss the new wave of vertically integrated food companies acting as both producer and distributor of their product. Ooshma explains how they have differentiated themselves at Gobble and what her vision is going forward.

They break down some of the changes in grocery stores over the past several years and why they are now “more like buffets” in Micah’s words. They also discuss some of the difficulties in an “atoms-based” business that software businesses don't have to contend with.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories Erik is joined by Sean Byrnes (@sbyrnes) and Shastri Mahadeo (@ShastriMahadeo). Sean is CEO of Outlier, a company using AI to create better business intelligence, and previously founded Flurry Analytics. Shastri is co-founder and CEO of Union Crate, a demand-planning tool for consumer packaged goods companies.

Sean shares an anecdote about how when he was in grad school for machine learning 20 years ago his classmates joked that what they were learning would never be relevant. He says that two things changed to make machine learning one of the hottest technologies of today: 1. the amount of data that companies have access to has exploded, and 2. the cost of computing has gone down dramatically. He also mentions that there have been no new machine learning techniques developed in the last 20 years and that the algorithms from his printed textbook from 20 years ago still encompass the breadth of techniques that are in use today.

Shastri previously ran a consumer packaged goods company for five years before founding Union Crate. He and Sean say that any company in the space needs to start with a solid value proposition that goes beyond just “AI for X.” They talk about why some of the companies in the space have failed to create real value and why Shastri pitches “ROI, not AI.”

They also talk about some of the opportunities in AI and their requests for startups in various verticals, including finance and insurance, healthcare, construction, and manufacturing. Sean talks about marketing being taken over by AI over the past few years while HR is still mostly human-driven.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Jonathan Gheller (@jgheller), founder of OneFix. Jonathan is a former product manager at Facebook and aims to use that experience to create retentive, easy-to-use products that create lasting behavior change. OneFix helps people eat better through a team of individuals who provide personalized support.

Jonathan talks about why preventable disease is such a big problem in the US today and the types of conditions like heart disease, stroke and diabetes that are entirely preventable, yet cause one in three deaths in the US. He explains why he decided to create a startup in the healthcare industry and why he chose nutrition as an area to focus on.

He also talks about the healthcare industry more broadly, including the misalignment of incentives between the parties involved, and why the industry does very well at acute care but not preventive care. He runs through what a prospective founder should think about when deciding what to work on in the health space and some of his requests for startups in the space as well.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Joining Erik on this episode is Jarrod Dicker (@jarroddicker), who is CEO of Po.et. He has a background in journalism and tech and formerly worked at the Washington Post and the Huffington Post.

Jarrod explains how he came to the idea for Po.et, why blockchain technology is important, and how it can augment journalism. He points out that if the protocol is successful, the company is likely to go out of business since the network will be self-managing. He talks about the idea of “proof of effort” and how it enables third party verification and smart contracts via the blockchain for journalists, photographers, and hopefully in the future all kinds of content creators.

They talk about the news business more broadly, including how the big tech platforms have been encroaching on the businesses of news organizations and why Slate makes more money on 50,000 pageviews on its own site than it would make through 6 million pageviews via Apple News. Jarrod explains why he says that we are in the “Napster era” of the news business.

Jarrod also talks about the future of the news business, and why journalists will become more like free agents. He says that readers and advertisers will have more direct contact with journalists outside of any given news organization, similar to the way that fans attend an artist’s concert not because of the artist's label, but for the artist specifically. This is in contrast to the prominence of the name of the news outlet in a journalist’s work.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik is joined by three guests, each with a personal connection to elder care:

- Natalie Dillon (@ntdillon), investor at Maveron
- Shawn Xu (@shawnxu), managing partner at Dorm Room Fund
- Lisa Marrone (@marronelisa), VC at August Capital

They start off by discussing Lisa's recent post about how we can better care for our elders and how to solve the often-occurring problem of loneliness in the elderly.

Throughout the episode the guests mention a bunch of startups doing great things, such as preventing falls using technology, connect college students and elders, and even detecting Alzheimer's using artificial intelligence.

They talk about the three main categories that they see in the space: digital therapeutics, virtual companionship and new models for residential care. Baby Boomers have different needs than those a decade or more older than them, and the four of them talk about how Boomers plan to age differently. They also point out how connected to technology Boomers are (60% of 65-69 year olds in the US have a smartphone).

Erik asks what their requests for startups would be in the space as well as what some of the challenges are for companies looking to create a business in the area.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories, Erik is joined by Lee Jacobs (@leejacobs), partner at Edelweiss Capital. He recently wrote a great post about breaking up with his co-founder at a previous company. Lee and Erik discuss the post, some of the thorny issues around co-founder relationships, and investing strategy more broadly.

Lee tells the story of the startup he co-founded and how he came to realize that he and the company needed to part ways. He talks about what he did well in the situation, including getting third-party coaching, and what he would do differently next time. Lee’s former co-founder was one of his groomsmen at Lee’s wedding, so in his case things worked out for the best in the long-run.

He talks about how to avoid blowing up your startup via a "co-founder breakup" and why open and honest communication is so important. They talk about having a “startup prenup” between the co-founders, how to pick a co-founder, and why these relationships are analogous to other types of non-work relationships.

They also talk about investing more broadly, including how Lee and Erik have gotten into investing globally, how to choose founders to back, why as Lee says “it’s okay to be a generalist,” and why he is sector-agnostic when it comes to companies he backs.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This episode is part of a three-part series taking listeners behind the curtain to discuss the inner workings of venture capital. Erik is joined by co-host for this episode, Adam Corey (@frumpy), partner at Village Global, and Clint Korver (@ckorver), managing director at Ulu Ventures.

They discuss Ulu’s approach to portfolio construction and how it is using data to figure out which companies to invest in. As you'll notice, Clint is a wealth of fascinating statistics about venture investing.

Clint explains why venture investing is analogous to other industries like pharmaceuticals and oil and gas extraction that follow a power law distribution. He points out that 100 venture investments out of 4,000 total in a given year create nearly all the profit in the venture industry. Clint explains how, taking cues from other industries mentioned above, Ulu uses data to predict which companies will be worth investing in.

He says that the two main tenets of their investing thesis at Ulu are: 1. Invest early, and 2. Have large portfolios. Clint runs through the rationale for these ideas and why they diverge from VC “conventional wisdom.” Erik and Adam discuss the approach that Village is taking and compare it to what Ulu and other VC firms are doing, in order to flesh out the differences in investing theses.

Clint also talks about the differences in returns between folllow-on and early stage and why Ulu doesn’t have a rigid reserve fund size. The three of them also talk about why the approaches of some of the biggest and most successful firms these days don’t scale down to smaller funds.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This episode is part of a three-part series taking listeners behind the curtain to discuss the inner workings of venture capital. On this episode Erik is joined by Parker Thompson (@pt), partner at AngelList, and angel investor Dustin Dolginow (@dolginow).

The trio discuss the past, present and future of scout programs. They start out by talking about Sequoia’s creation of the scout program nearly ten years ago and why it was considered a “loss leader” for the firm, meaning that it generated goodwill and created a network, but the return on the deals was not actually very good.

The three of them discuss some of the potential pitfalls of the scout program, whether it can create good returns on its own, and the similarities and differences of Village’s Network Leader program to existing scout programs.

Both Dustin and Parker have worked at AngelList, and the two discuss why AngelList’s model, which Parker calls a “1099 VC model.” They talk about how and when we might see a recreation of the consensus decision-making system that pervades the industry today and why that change is needed. They also talk about how someone seeking to get into venture or being a scout for a venture fund can do so.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This episode is part of a three-part series taking listeners behind the curtain to discuss the inner workings of venture capital. Parker Thompson (@pt), partner at AngelList, and Ash Fontana (@ashfontana), general partner at Zetta Ventures, join Erik on this episode.

They start off by discussing why topics around VC and portfolio construction in particular are so controversial. Parker and Ash give a rundown of how they invest with their respective funds and what their theses are when it comes to venture investing. They address the perennial debate of how much money to allot to initial round investing versus reserves for follow-on investing.

It gets pointed out that based on the data, new funds are as likely as existing funds to succeed, and they talk about whether there’s a universal answer to the question of how much money under management a VC would ideally like to have. The three of them talk about the possibility of scaling up a fund with operating partners and discuss research that shows that the more companies invested in, the better the returns. That trend continues to hold, in theory, no matter how big the fund gets. However, Parker brings up the "math versus reality dichotomy," and they talk about why in practice scaling up infinitely doesn’t work.

Erik asks both of them how they would set up their fund if they had no constraints, and they talk about why "fund size is destiny" in venture. Ash and Parker explain why even though venture firms say that the founder is their customer, really the LPs are the actual customers. They also talk about why innovation is needed on the standard “2 and 20” model (2% management fees and 20% carry), discuss potential replacement models, and explain why Y Combinator has the best business model in venture, even though there are some pitfalls for entrepreneurs.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories Erik is joined by Parker Thompson (@pt), partner at AngelList, and Parker Conrad (@parkerconrad), CEO of Rippling.

In this episode they talk about how much value investors provide to founders, if any at all. They agree that the number one piece of value that an investor provides is as therapist for the founder. They get into the issues around mis-alignment of incentives between investors and founders and discuss some investor horror stories they’ve heard from founders that you typically won’t hear discussed out loud. Parker Conrad says that sometimes investors are value-destroyers.

They discuss why investors need to market themselves as “founder-friendly” and why if someone needs to point out that they “add value” then they likely aren’t adding as much value as they’d like you to think. Parker and Parker talk about the amount of signalling in investing and why VCs do things as much for their LPs as for the founders. They agree that the impact of investors on your company is overrated and that a good investor has about the same effect as a good director-level hire.

They also discuss the idea of a union for entrepreneurs, the effects of standardized deal terms and why the idea of a “Glassdoor for investors” hasn’t found traction yet.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Noah Smith (@Noahpinion) joins Erik on this episode. Noah is an economist and Bloomberg Opinion writer. The two have a wide-ranging discussion on a number of topics around tech, economics, politics, and more.

Noah explains why concern over big Silicon Valley tech companies is perhaps overblown. They discuss cryptocurrency and why in Noah’s opinion the Austrian economists have it wrong. He also explains why he is not a fan of techno-libertarianism and runs through the gun as historical example of why technologists shouldn’t just build new tech to circumvent laws they don’t like.

The two talk about why the government drives more innovation than it commonly gets credit for, what kinds of policies Noah would implement to reduce inequality, including why he would like to see an inheritance tax. Erik also asks about charter cities and Noah explains why they are a great idea in theory but that they will be a “hard sell.”

Erik asks about a blog post of Noah’s from 2015 that seems quite prescient given the current moment, in which he describes a cycle of history involving globalization, financialization, economic decline, political polarization, leading to feuding between the right and the left. He talks about which stage he thinks we are in today and some of the historical parallels between the current moment and earlier eras in which war later broke out.

Erik also asks what Noah would do if he could change anything about how education is delivered in America, why Noah says that UBI could be potentially destructive, and how his criticisms of macroeconomics have evolved.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Laura Deming (@laurademing) joins Erik in downtown San Francisco on this episode of Venture Stories. She is the creator of Longevity Fund, a venture capital firm investing in companies that will let humans live both longer and healthier.

Erik starts by asking about the state of longevity science and which discoveries about aging Laura is most excited about. It turns out that certain animals don’t age the way that humans do and that there are certain animals that are similar to each other (like rats and naked mole rats) that nevertheless have wildly different life expectancies. These discoveries have Laura very excited about the possibilities for extending the human lifespan — in fact, she compares them to “finding gold in your living room” and says they don’t get enough attention.

They talk about why creating a venture fund is the best way for Laura to make an impact on this problem as well as the realities of venture funding in the life sciences space. Laura explains why returns are so important.

Erik asks how those of us who are not scientists can get involved in the space and which companies Laura is most excited about. She also runs through some of her requests for startups in the field.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories, Erik is joined by Daniel Gross, founder of Pioneer, “an online tournament for productivity.” Prior to starting Pioneer, he founded Cue, a machine learning company that was acquired by Apple.

Erik and Daniel discuss a wide variety of topics, including why saying something is “insanely great” isn’t necessarily a compliment for a founder, how to play “the video game that is life,” why the best way to get the physique you want is to move (cities), and how Twitter has reshaped the human psyche.

They discuss Pioneer and how Daniel has thought about the decisions that went into its design. He talks about his aim of creating a “digital Ivy League campus” that harnesses the mechanics of games and applies them to more productive ends. Daniel also discusses why he says that life is like "a series of infinite games.”

They also cover a number of other topics, including how Daniel thinks about friendships, the parallels between Pioneer and religion, how Daniel would change the education system, and why people will compete against each other but cooperate against an AI. They close with a game where Erik names a number of prominent individuals and Daniel talks about what he’s learned from that person.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Mark Lutter (@MarkLutter), founder and executive director of the Centre For Innovative Governance Research, joins Erik on this special two-hour episode to talk about charter cities.

They start off by discussing how Mark became interested in the idea of charter cities. Mark explains the two main schools of thought when it comes to new forms of governance and talks about his philosophy for figuring out the best way to govern and how that involves charter cities.

He talks about the recent interest from Silicon Valley in charter cities and some of the projects that have been going on in the space. Mark talks about seasteading and why the promise of that project wasn’t realized. He points out that there are over 200 masterplanned cities being built around the world.

Mark explains the differences between charter cities and special economic zones and the main models for charter cities and special economic zones. Erik asks what forms of government Mark would advocate for if he was building a brand new charter city from scratch.

Mark talks about the reasons for avoiding centralized planning and reasoning from first principles and instead running experiments to see what kinds of phenomena emerge. They also have a lightning round where Erik names an individual and Mark explains where he agrees and disagrees with that individual’s thinking.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories, Erik is joined by two exciting guests: Qasar Younis (@qasar), co-founder of Applied Intuition, and Alexandr Wang (@alexandr_wang), CEO of Scale.

Both Qasar and Alex are creating software that is transforming the way autonomous vehicles are being developed. The three of them have an expansive conversation about where autonomous technology is at today and how the technology and industry might evolve in the future. Throughout the conversation the founders peel back the curtain on the autonomous vehicle development process and put forth are a number of ideas about autonomous technology that run counter to the prevailing narrative in the media today.

They begin by talking about some of the specific ways that software is transforming the auto industry and in what ways the tools the founders are building are being used in the development of autonomous technology. Erik asks about the pros and cons of being a horizontal company vs. a vertical company in the space, and Qasar and Alex discuss the extent to which existing car manufacturers have modularized the parts that go into traditional vehicles and why this trend will continue with autonomous technology.

Qasar and Alex point out that the key question now is not if, but when, autonomous technology will be deployed at mass scale, and say that even three years ago it was unclear whether it was going to happen at all. They compare the industry as it exists now to the early days of the iPhone and say that like the iPhone app explosion, self-driving cars will be only one application that emerges on top of autonomous technology, which will itself be a much bigger market than the smartphone market.

Qasar and Alex both agree that robo-taxis are overly focused on by the media and that other applications of autonomous technology such as in trucking, last-mile delivery and warehouses will arrive sooner and will be both much larger and more consequential than robo-taxis. Alex says that he believes autonomous vehicle technology will be only one part of a broader “robot revolution” in society.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik Torenberg, co-founder and partner of Village Global, recently hosted an event for entrepreneurs in San Francisco to hear from founders of Village Global portfolio companies who have been through Village’s Network Catalyst accelerator.

Joining Erik were:

Nancy Yu (@nancyyu25), co-founder and CEO of RDMD, a company working to accelerate treatment for patients with rare diseases.

Amrita Saigal, co-founder of Saathi, a company creating fully eco-friendly, compostable sanitary napkins in India.

Jared Seehafer (@seehafer), co-founder and CEO of Enzyme, and a Village Global Network Leader.

Nancy and Amrita talk about what it was like to go through the Network Catalyst program and how it has impacted the growth of their companies. Jared discusses being an advisor to the founders in the program.

They talk about what makes Network Catalyst unique, including the emphasis at Village on the network, Village’s personalized one-on-one work with companies, the willingness to put on events dedicated entirely to one company and the influence that Village’s luminaries have had on the trajectory of the companies.

The founders also share the details of their journey thus far and give their thoughts on some of the thorny issues that founders have to deal with in the course of starting a company, like finding the right co-founder, how to ideate through solutions, and the importance of of founder-idea fit.

To apply to the program, visit www.villageglobal.vc/networkcatalyst/

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Joining Erik for this episode are Brianne Kimmel (@briannekimmel), investor, advisor and Village Global Network Leader as well as Josh Stein (@dfjjosh), partner at DFJ.

They start off by discussing the "consumerization of enterprise SaaS." More and more frequently new software is implemented at enterprises because ordinary employees use a service as a consumer and advocate for its use within the company. Brianne and Josh talk about why the enterprise is such a different animal compared to consumer SaaS and the challenges that fact presents for young founders. Josh tells the story of Aaron Levie, who was only 20 when Josh backed him at Box and had not only not sold to the enterprise but had never worked in a big company.

They discuss how the SaaS landscape has changed, including why $50-100M in revenue isn't enough to go public and why investors are now looking for companies doing at least $1B in revenue. Brianne and Josh also point out the uniqueness of Silicon Valley, and caution that founders from the Bay Area both underestimate the amount of Microsoft lock-in outside the Bay and overrate the impact of the traction they can get by selling to other startups within Silicon Valley.

Erik asks where the opportunities are in SaaS and enterprise, whether it's better to have a vertical or horizontal SaaS company, and where the market is oversaturated. Josh also explains why he says that AI is actually underhyped.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In the first all-Australian episode of Venture Stories Erik interviews returning guest Ash Fontana (@ashfontana), general partner at Zetta Ventures, and his fellow countryman, Anthony Goldbloom (@antgoldbloom), CEO of Kaggle.

Ash’s fund is the first fund devoted exclusively to AI and machine learning, and the three talk about how to evaluate companies, founders and ideas in the space. Ash says that the founders he looks for are often pre-traction but post-data, meaning that they have the data but are trying to find a way to make their machine learning work commercially viable. He points out that certain data-gathering techniques just aren’t viable for a startup when “you have to lose money to learn in the machine learning space.”

The trio discuss a number of the coolest current applications of machine learning as well as where they would like to see companies bring machine learning in the future. They talk about the present and potential future impact of machine learning techniques in data labeling, oil and gas, healthcare, and the enterprise.

Anthony and Ash also talk about some of the trends they see coming in machine learning, including moving data and machine learning to the cloud as well as the use of private or disguised data to allow sensitive data sets to be analyzed by a broader group of people. They also discuss which areas prospective founders should avoid and why machine learning is conducive to certain types of problems but not others.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In this extended episode of Venture Stories, Erik interviews Tyler Cowen (@tylercowen), professor of economics at George Mason University. They discuss about a wide range of topics, including Tyler’s book Stubborn Attachments, the value of watching sports, travel, Bitcoin, the Knicks, and Effective Altruism — among many, many others.

Tyler explains why he has only two “stubborn attachments” — human rights and economic growth. He takes us through his argument that there’s a moral imperative for economic growth. He talks about why economic growth is the greatest force for good in the world, why redistribution isn’t as effective as Effective Altruists would like, and why we dramatically underestimate the effects of compounding. He discusses some of the reactions to the book and why he says he’s “poked the left in the eye and poked the right in the eye” with Stubborn Attachments.

They discuss the reasons for the extraordinary economic growth of East Asian countries and what kinds of lessons the West could take from those examples. Tyler talks about whether religion has an impact on economic growth and why inequality isn’t as big a deal as it’s made out to be.

Erik asks Tyler what he would do if he could wave a magic wand and change a number of entities, including the US healthcare system, the Knicks, and the Department of Education. Tyler tells Erik whether he would buy Bitcoin and gives his thoughts on central banking and Austrian economics. He also explains why travel is so valuable and why “at the margins people should be more like anthropologists.”

Erik asks Tyler where his views diverge from those of a number of prominent intellectuals, including Thomas Piketty, Russ Roberts, Ayn Rand, and Glen Weyl. Tyler explains why he suspects the environment in which someone grew up influences their thinking style.

Tyler’s own podcast Conversations with Tyler has been a big inspiration to Erik and Venture Stories, so Erik concludes with an homage with a round of overrated vs. underrated and by asking Tyler what his production function is for the podcast.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Health Stories, Erik is joined by Nikhil Krishnan (@nikillinit), of CB Insights and Nick Soman (@nicksoman), of Decent.

Today they're talking about “the combination of two insanely complex topics.” They start out by discussing the potential applications of blockchain technology in the healthcare space and why it might not be ready for primetime just yet.

They dive into some of the applications, including unique patient identifiers and why the lack of a system to transfer records between health providers results in a “ludicrously high number of medical errors.” They also talk about the fact that anonymized health data is often sold without the consent of the patient and that there are billion-dollar companies that advertise on the front page of their websites that they can provide anonymized health data for 500M patients.

As with any Health Stories episode, they discuss the distortion of incentives in the healthcare industry. On this episode they discuss the “medical loss ratio” and why it means that “everybody other than the patient makes more money when costs go up.” They point out that healthcare problems aren’t technology problems and are instead distribution and incentives problems. They also tell us that the health industry is the single largest public employer and the single largest lobbyist in the country.

They also talk about the possibility of using cryptocurrency in driving behavior change in patients, what the “remember blockchain?” eulogy for the tech might look like in 2030 if it doesn’t pan out, how Apple, Amazon and Google getting involved in the space might change thing, and why days are (hopefully) numbered for companies whose business models are predicated on a lack of trust and transparency.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories, Erik is joined by co-host Tony Sheng to interview John Backus (@backus), founder of Bloom and Cognito, two companies working on decentralized lending and identity.

Co-host Tony Sheng (@tonysheng) leads product at Decentraland. He also publishes analyses on the business and strategy of crypto at tonysheng.com and is one of Village’s Network Leaders.

John recently wrote a popular post about the history of decentralized peer-to-peer file sharing in the late 1990s and early 2000s. He joins Erik and Tony to expand on the post and talk about what that history can teach us about decentralization today.

He takes us through the history of file sharing apps from Napster to Kazaa to BitTorrent. He explains why the way BitTorrent is architected “doesn’t make sense” from a technical point of view and why the legal system has had such an impact on the way BitTorrent works.

John explains some of the legal challenges to peer-to-peer sharing and how they’ve adjusted. The push to decentralize is often considered a recent phenomenon but he describes a number of projects from many years ago that are actually pretty similar to what people are attempting to build today. He even talks about an early version of a token that was created by a decentralized file sharing service back in the early 2000s.

He concludes with why a number of these projects didn’t succeed and what lessons they have for decentralized projects today. He explains that the UX of decentralized services is often very poor, which makes it “an order of magnitude harder to find product-market fit.”

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined in this episode by co-host Tonio DeSorrento (@TonioDeSo), CEO and co-founder of Vemo Education, and Dave Girouard (@davegirouard), CEO and founder of Upstart.

They have a lively discussion about the history of income-sharing agreements, the forms in which they exist presently, and how the agreements might change or expand in the future.

Dave gives us an overview of Upstart and why he says they are like “Kickstarter meets LendingClub.” Although Upstart is thriving now, it wasn’t always that way. In the early days of the company, they tried to pioneer the idea of a generalized income-sharing agreement. Dave runs through why that didn’t work out and how they got to where Upstart is today.

Dave and Tonio share some stories about their early work on income-sharing agreements and compare theories on how these agreements might evolve and spread to different areas in the future. They talk about how income-sharing agreements align incentives between two parties and help quantify the value that one party provides another. They lay out a map for how something like an income-sharing agreement could be of assistance to a manual laborer deciding on a hospital in which to have a knee surgery.

They also contemplate the future of higher education, which Tonio points out is a $500 billion dollar industry that has 19 million students enrolled in any given year, and whether disruption will come from outside or from within the institutions themselves. Tonio also explains why income-sharing agreements and the data they produce are so helpful to people trying to decide which education institution to attend.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik’s co-host for this episode is Ali Hamed (@AliBHamed) of CoVenture. They are interviewing Tonio DeSorrento (@TonioDeSo), CEO and co-founder of Vemo Education.

They talk about the history of income-sharing agreements, including that Milton Friedman had once proposed the idea and that Yale University had experimented with them at one point.

Tonio talks about starting Vemo and how he has brought income-sharing agreements to more and more educational institutions. They discuss the fact that 88% of students entering college are doing so to improve their early career path but that most institutions would say that providing a career path is not the primary value they provide. Tonio explains that Vemo has helped students find the right institution for them by publishing outcomes from the income-sharing agreements. He says that this transparency of outcomes has in and of itself changed how colleges look at the service they provide.

They move on to talking about the future of higher education in general, why there doesn’t yet exist a Kickstarter for education (and what some of the pitfalls of that model would be) and in which other industries something similar to income-share (or “value-share”) agreements might make sense. Tonio also talks about how Vemo plans to scale and where they go from here.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories, Erik is joined by Mike Merrill (@kmikeym), the world’s first and only publicly traded person, along with Mike’s friend, co-founder and shareholder, Marcus Estes (@marcusestes), co-founder and CEO of Chroma.

We hear the backstory on how Mike became the world’s first “publicly traded person” and hear a funny story about an early 2000s arts group turned their group into a corporation in order to thwart an attempt by an e-commerce company to take over their domain name.

They run through the ins and outs of what life is like for Mike and how having a live market where anyone can buy or sell “shares” in him distinguishes this from other experiments. He says that he originally set up the arrangement to give people input into his side projects but over time their decision-making power has expanded to his personal life. He explains how this has influenced how he thinks about the idea of owning “shares” in other people more generally.

Mike talks about the element of satire present in the project and how it has poked fun at the idea in society that worth in general is tied to financial factors. He talks about how this project has revealed warped incentives for his investors.

They describe the regulatory environment in America, how it has evolved to make things like this possible, and the unique way that Mike has structured this to make it legal. They talk about whether it would make sense for more people to do this, about income-share agreements more broadly and how Marcus and Chroma might get involved.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In this special live episode of Venture Stories, Erik Torenberg interviews two special guests about the present and future of crypto: Naval Ravikant (@naval), CEO and co-founder of AngelList, and Balaji Srinivasan (@balajis), CTO of Coinbase.

They start with an overview of the history of organizing societies and the role of centralized decision-makers from kings to democracies and why decentralization — where no one in particular is in charge but everybody follows the rules — has so much potential. They talk about how this could be disruptive to a wide swath of society today, including areas like money, electricity, social networks, storage, and more. They explain why decentralization will "fulfill the original promise of the internet."

Erik asks how each of them got into the space after having had success in other areas. It’s pointed out that it’s very rare that something comes along that is “technologically interesting, socially revolutionary, and that can also make you very rich.” They move on to a discussion of the history of money, the three key functions that money provides (store of value, unit of account and medium of exchange) and how good a job current cryptocurrencies are doing at fulfilling those three functions. They also point out that VCs typically didn’t buy Ether, but it has provided a 700X return in just a few years, which is better than VCs returned on Google or Facebook.

They move on to what they see in the future for crypto and how it will change society at large. They paint a picture of a world where there might be virtual “instant jobs” available on-demand in a feed akin to the feeds in current social networks and where the “99%” will be investors, as opposed to the present where only 1% of individuals are investors. There might also exist in the future “instant companies” that can be created as easily as someone can create an account on a social network today and that programmable smart contracts might spread opportunity far and wide without the need for armies of lawyers and judges.

They explain what it means when they say that blockchain will create “an open financial system” and what they mean when they say it will be to the current financial system what Linux was to Windows. They also talk about what kinds of facts would change their mind about blockchain, the role of identity and anonymity in a crypto world, and the concept of a “personal burn rate.”

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Patri Friedman joins Erik on this episode of Venture Stories. He founded The Seasteading Institute in 2008 with funding from Peter Thiel. His father is political theorist David Friedman and his grandfather is Nobel Laureate in economics, Milton Friedman.

Over the course of their nearly two-hour conversation they cover a lot of ground, including crypto, physical (and virtual) governance, the current state of politics, Silicon Valley, and much more.

Patri starts by explaining why he is both skeptical and optimistic about crypto — and why that position is not incompatible. He says that the tech boom around 2000 had “a lot of junk” but a lot of innovation came out of it at the same time.

He talks about starting The Seasteading Institute, the impetus behind the project and the successes and challenges they have had. He enumerates the issues with the structures of current countries, governments, and legal systems around the world and why by the logic of the market, one would expect countries and legal systems not to be very innovative. With experiments underway involving special economic zones incorporating novel legal systems, that might change.

Patri explains what he means by the phrase “markets eating the world” and points out that platforms and sharing economy companies form half of of all current unicorns. He talks about how in the same fashion as software has been “eating the world,” he expects the same to happen with markets. He points out that the determination of resource allocation involves economics and trade-offs, whether done by a central figure or markets. He explains some of the novel uses of markets in unexpected areas and the two discuss some of the drawbacks and challenges with markets in delicate areas such as healthcare or education.

He talks about some of the flaws present in democracy, including the idea that it provides citizens the illusion of control without providing any actual control and contrasts the potential distorted incentives of a central trusted authority figure versus a more decentralized market-driven approach of distributing resources. Patri says that he views the problem of figuring out the best kind of governance as an engineering problem requiring experimentation rather than a philosophical problem requiring deep thought and persuasion.

They also talk about why he says in areas as varied as food, education and computing, our “desires are being hijacked” by profit-driven entities and why in the future it would be wise to return to more historically-proven strategies in those areas. He also talks about why he expects the pace of changes in the world to continue to increase, why it will take even more skill for someone to eke out a basic living, the past and present culture of Silicon Valley, and what he expects the world will look like when his kids are grown up.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This is a special episode of Venture Stories recorded in front of a live audience in San Francisco, featuring Tyler Cowen (@tylercowen), professor of economics at George Mason University and Eric Schmidt (@ericschmidt), former executive chairman and CEO at Google/Alphabet.

Cowen talks to Schmidt about a wide range of topics, from Schmidt’s college years, to his time as an intern at Bell Labs, to working for Scott McNealy at Sun Microsystems, to the early days of Google, to today.

Cowen asks about Schmidt’s formative intellectual experiences as a young person and we hear the story of Schmidt studying as an architect prior to entering into a computer science program. After graduation, Schmidt interned at both Xerox PARC and Bell Labs. He recounts stories of his time at the research labs and discusses to what extent the lab model does or doesn’t work today. Cowen astutely points out that Schmidt is one of the few people around whose career spans several significant eras in the history of computing.

They move on to talking about the early days at Google, where it turns out that Schmidt was hired to run the company after a skiing trip with Larry and Sergey, whose first concern in hiring “adult supervision” was to find someone they enjoyed hanging out with. Schmidt says that he initially assumed that search wasn't very important and that Google’s ads didn’t work. He reveals that during his first year he was so terrified that their "ruse would unravel" that he made anyone who wanted to spend money come to him personally on Fridays at 10am to justify the expense.

Cowen asks about Schmidt’s insights on hiring and managing talent. Schmidt explains that in the beginning Larry and Sergey primarily hired their classmates and friends, but over time Google’s hiring became highly structured. He tells the story of interviewing a single candidate 16 times and explains the logic of why initially they were so focused on school and GPA, rather than industry experience.

Cowen and Schmidt also talk about in which areas even Schmidt himself has been surprised at the extent of technological progress and where he'd like to see more innovation. They discuss social media and why Schmidt says that it amplifies human weaknesses rather than strengths. The two of them also talk about transforming cities, including Alphabet’s Sidewalk Labs project in Toronto and the Bay Area's housing crisis.

They of course also have a round of rapid-fire “overrated vs. underrated,” covering subjects like Antarctica, Picasso, effective altruism, Yellowstone and North Korea. Cowen also asks his signature question about the Eric Schmidt "production function" and how Schmidt is able to be so productive.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik was interviewed by Jacob Evan Smith (@jacobsmith88) at Venture For America in Detroit, which is where Erik attended the University of Michigan before he started his live rap battle app, rapt.fm.

In this episode he talks about founding and running rapt.fm, why it didn’t work out, and how he ended up joining Product Hunt before co-founding Village Global.

Erik explains why it’s not important that entrepreneurs get it right the first time, but instead that they don’t stop trying.

He talks about why lifestyle businesses are unfairly looked down upon in startup world, the usefulness of failing, and why you need to keep your identity separate from your company.

He also talks about why you want to do things that seem hard to other people but easy to you and why when building a network you should give without taking, without thought of what you might get in return.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Health Stories, Erik is joined by James Hardiman (@hardimanjames) and Scott Barclay (@SABarclay) of Data Collective, a deep tech and AI venture fund.

Scott and James are live in-studio with Erik to discuss a number of interesting topics around the health space.

Scott and James explain what they mean when they say innovation in the last 50 years was driven by the semiconductor but the next 50 years will be driven by biotechnology.

The three of them discuss the state of the healthcare in the US and how entrepreneurs and investors can “take a crowbar to the health system.”

They discuss the misaligned incentives in the US healthcare system and how payers might be incentivized to pay for preventative care. They mention that the US pays about 18% of GDP for healthcare while still having poorer health outcomes than countries in Northern Europe that pay about 9% of GDP.

They explain why they are predicting a contraction in the number of hospitals in the US and why there are double to triple the number of hospitals per capita in the US than there are in a country like Denmark.

They also talk about a number of interesting developments in health tech these days, including a company that can verify the integrity of a supply chain by analyzing the microbiome of the resultant products and a company that is using computer vision to detect falls.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories, Erik and his co-host Tony Sheng are joined by Jacob Arluck (@JacobArluck) of Tezos and Peter Czaban of Polkadot and the Web3 Foundation.

The four of them get into the details of the mechanisms of governance, including voting, councils, and other methods of governance.

They discuss hard forks and why they are not ideal but sometimes necessary. The group also discusses common misconceptions around on-chain governance and their requests for products or startups in the space.

They explain what it means to get to the decentralized ideal without re-centralizing when it comes to governance as well as why the best case scenario for crypto users is that they are not thinking about governance at all as it recedes into the background.

Co-host Tony Sheng (@tonysheng) leads product at Decentraland. He also publishes analyses on the business and strategy of crypto at tonysheng.com and is one of Village’s Network Leaders.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories, Erik is joined by James Currier (@JamesCurrier) and Pete Flint (@peteflint), of NFX. NFX is a great venture capital firm founded on the concept of network effects. Erik, James and Pete cover a bunch of fascinating topics in the interview.

Pete and James explain why network effects make such good businesses — so good in fact, that they don’t have to even be run particularly well to still have great revenue, as James found out when he sold to a big incumbent.

Erik asks whether it’s possible to add network effects to an existing business or whether they have to be baked into the business model from the beginning. He also runs through a variety of verticals like healthcare, real estate, education, travel and others, asking his guests to talk about where the opportunities are to build businesses that leverage network effects in those spaces.

James explains what he means by the phrase “the best entrepreneurs are going to be the best historians” and they talk about why “timing is everything” and why a startup like Airbnb can be founded based on an economic impetus rather than a technological catalyst.

They also talk about why network effects are so important within Silicon Valley and why NFX believes that the best startups will come from inside the Valley, despite efforts to spread the “secret sauce” to other geographies. James says that there might be a lot of failed startups outside of the Valley.

They also talk about distributed teams and whether it’s possible to build a really big business with a distributed team, as well as the often overlooked importance of the name of a company.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Gabriel Otte (@gabeotte), CEO and co-founder of Freenome, joins Erik on this episode of Venture Stories to talk about cancer screening.

Gabriel starts out by talking about why he got into the cancer screening space and how Freenome got started.

He lays out the different methods of cancer detection and why Freenome has chosen their specific approach to the problem. Erik asks how it compares to other companies working on similar problems and Gabriel helps create a market map of the space.

Gabriel points out that 93 million people in the United States were instructed by their doctor to be screened for colorectal cancer last year but 70 million of them did nothing at all. He talks about why Freenome has chosen to hone in on this specific type of cancer screening and why it lends itself to an improved UX.

They move on to a discussion of the uniqueness of building a product and company in the health space and why the dynamics are so different than those of other tech companies. Gabriel talks about the FDA approval process and why it pays to engage with them early, as well as how a company should go about ensuring that their tests will be reimbursed by payers.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Gabe Bassin (@gabebassin) and Taylor Pearson (@TaylorPearsonMe) join Erik for this episode.

They cover a lot of ground in this episode where they explore some of the coming financial challenges that the US faces and how crypto might impact the markets and the economy in general.

Gabe gives an overview of the current state of public debt and future government obligations. He explains how the fed ended up with four trillion dollars on its balance sheet.

He says that “the market’s been programmed to be saved” and talks about the impacts of quantitative easing, or printing more money. Gabe and Taylor discuss volatility in the markets and potential looming financial crises.

Gabe points out that public pension funds are underfunded and that fund managers need to make a 7% annualized return to meet their obligations. Given that these funds are the biggest players in the markets, this has a number of implications both for the market and society in general.

They close out by talking about crypto and Bitcoin specifically, and how it might have an impact on all of this.

Charts mentioned in this episode:

Inflation as it relates to quantitative easing: https://twitter.com/gabebassin/status/1032259327745253376

VIX Futures: http://vixcentral.com/

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This is a deep dive into the mind of Eugene Wei. Erik and Eugene discuss all kinds of topics, including the unique state of ambition in Silicon Valley, “apprenticeships” for white collar jobs, Eugene’s favorite fiction books, what he would do if he was running the New York Knicks, and much more.

They start by talking about the differences in extent and type of ambition between Silicon Valley and other places like New York or LA, as well as how you might spread the spirit of entrepreneurship that lives in the Valley further afield.

Eugene talks about the progression of his career and what kind of advice he would have for others. He talks about the twists and turns in his career and describes what it was like going back to film school after having worked at Amazon.

They talk about Eugene’s reading habits and the fact that he reads 20 non-fiction books at a time simultaneously. He also gives his recommendations on his favorite fiction books.

Eugene says that Jeff Bezos had a different young executive shadow him for a period of time and explains his idea of an “apprenticeship” for white collar jobs and the value of learning by observing.

They also have a round of underrated vs. overrated and Erik asks Eugene what he would do if he was running Medium, Spotify and the New York Knicks.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In this episode of Health Stories, Erik is talking to Othman Laraki (@othman) and Alicia Zhou (@ay_zhou) of Color. Othman is co-founder and CEO and Alicia Zhou is Head of Research.

Othman explains the personal reason that he started Color and why he got involved in the healthcare space after previously working at Google and running a company that was acquired by Twitter.

Alicia and Othman explain the advances Color has made in genomics and how the approach they’re taking is different from that of other companies in the space. You might not have known that 30% of your health is related to your genome. There are also a number of new types of care that can be unlocked by having your genome sequenced.

Othman explains how at Color they are hoping to follow the model of Google or Amazon where early in the company’s life they focus on doing one thing really well, then expand into other areas. He also talks about where he would be building a company in the space if he wasn't working at Color as well as where he might look to invest.

They also discuss the time Othman wore a glucose monitor full-time and how it changed how he thinks about health, why he is hoping for an “iPhone moment” in the healthcare space, and why the future of cancer treatment will be much more about prevention than treatment.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Sunny Aggarwal (@sunnya97) of Cosmos and Tendermint joins Erik and co-host Haseeb Qureshi (@hosseeb), GP at MetaStable Capital, for this episode of Crypto Stories.

They discuss how blockchains could be made to be interoperable with one another. Sunny explains why this is an important problem and what he is doing about it with Cosmos. He talks about why different types of tokens cannot yet be exchanged confidently.

Sunny uses the analogy of a multithreaded CPU that we all use these days to explain how interoperable blockchains might work. They compare it to sharding and talk about how it would affect payments.

Haseeb also asks what Sunny would like the crypto world to look like if he is successful with Cosmos and what the potential pitfalls might be.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In this episode Alex Danco (@alex_danco) of Social Capital joins Erik to talk about Silicon Valley, economics, innovation, crypto, software and more. He is a very unique thinker with interesting opinions about the tech space.

Alex explains the influence of Peter Thiel and Rene Girard on his thinking. He explains what he means when he says the key to understanding the world is asking, "what is everyone is compelled to lie about?"

He gives a history of how innovation has traditionally proceeded in the world and explains how Silicon Valley — via software specifically — has changed the mechanism of innovation. He talks about how this has resulted in disproportionate gains accruing to the huge tech companies.

This new model of innovation has also changed how companies are valued. Alex breaks down the new metrics that are being used by VCs and founders to value their firms — and why this could be contributing to a new tech bubble.

Alex also talks about the economics of the Valley and why gains in productivity from technology have not resulted in increased leisure for the Valley's inhabitants.

He also talks about crypto, career strategy, cost disease, scooters, and much more.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Adrian Aoun (@adrianaoun), founder of Forward, a company that is trying to reinvent how primary healthcare is delivered. His previous company Wavii, was acquired by Google — where Adrian led AI efforts as well as working on special projects for Google’s CEO.

Adrian explains the personal reason for his desire to found a healthcare company. He talks about why he is trying to build something completely outside the traditional healthcare system and gives a rundown of the amazing tech that Forward has been working on.

The two of them also discuss why no healthcare company has achieved the scale that tech companies have — and how Forward might be one of the first companies to achieve that scale.

Erik asks Adrian about his lessons learned when it comes to scaling and Adrian has a number of great tips about how to identify talent.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik and his co-host Taylor Pearson (@TaylorPearsonMe), author of The End of Jobs, are joined by Dhruv Bansal (@dhruvbansal), co-founder of Unchained Capital.

On this episode they discuss a number of interesting topics, getting progressively “weirder” as they go along. In the beginning they get Dhruv’s take on the contrasts between Bitcoin and Ethereum and how the prevailing narrative around each of them affects how people perceive their strengths and weaknesses.

By the end, they’re discussing if it’s possible to have money if humans are an interstellar species and whether it’s possible that Satoshi is a time-traveller from the future.

In between, they cover a number of (equally) interesting topics, like Dhruv’s idea that blockchains are technologies for building political system” and why blockchain and Bitcoin are not actually a continuation of the internet, as they are commonly portrayed. Dhruv also explains what the “Nakamoto Point” is, where he would be investing, and what his “requests for products” are in the space.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This episode of Venture Stories was recorded in front of a live audience in San Francisco in October 2018. Keith was interviewed by Village Global partner and co-founder, Erik Torenberg.

In the episode they cover a number of topics, and Keith (as usual) is very insightful.

Keith breaks down some of the successes that mentees of his have had over the past few years. Many of them came from non-technical backgrounds and non-elite schools. He talks about their career trajectory and which inflection points led to their advancement and how young people in similar situations can model their careers after them.

Erik explains the four dimensions over which he thinks about career building and where he thinks young people are over-optimizing.

Keith shares what Peter Thiel told him about hiring while the two were on a run around the Stanford campus shortly after Keith joined PayPal. He talks about how as a manager he challenges the people working for him, and why as an employee you should always want to feel like you’re pushing the boundaries of what you’re capable of.

They move on to what makes a good startup idea and the three factors that Keith uses to evaluate business ideas.

They also take questions from the audience where Keith addresses work-life balance and why creating a startup is like casting and creating a movie.

Quotable lines from this episode:

“You don't want to be the best at what you do, you want to be the only one that does what you do.”

“If you’re going to start a company and if you believe that the team you build is the company you build — you want to have unfair advantage in evaluating people.”

“VC is one of the best jobs in the world if you’re intellectually curious.”

“[Working in VC] is like learning to play basketball with NBA all-stars.”

“When you want to make a decision, optimize on one variable. Don't make a pros and cons list.”

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Health Stories, Erik is joined by Jay Desai (@jdesai01) of PatientPing (patientping.com) and Joe Kahn (@josephwandile) of Karuna Health (meetkaruna.com).

Both Joe and Jay are working on how to make sure that patient care is coordinated across multiple providers. When patients visit different providers, their care information is not shared between them and Jay and Joe are working to change that.

The two companies are taking different approaches to the problem and the two founders explain why they’ve chosen to attack the problem the way they have and how they got started down this path.

Joe and Jay explain how they are helping some of the most vulnerable individuals in the healthcare system and why this is nevertheless a good business to be in and why optimizing their care is good for providers.

They give their recommendations on where they would be investing if they were running a fund in the healthcare space as well as what opportunities exist in the industry. They also explain why healthcare is not like e-commerce or ridesharing and instead more like advertising, in that we are in general trying to spend less, not more, on healthcare and are trying to get more value while reducing spend.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In this episode Erik is joined by Ryan Sean Adams (@RyanSAdams) of Mythos Capital and Dan Zuller (@danzuller) of Vision Hill Advisors.

They talk about their backgrounds, how they became interested in crypto, and how that has informed what they are doing now with their companies in the space. Ryan explains why he’s structured Mythos as a holding company rather than a hedge fund or venture fund. Dan talks about how to bridge traditional finance and crypto and takes us through the current “money stack” that is worth an estimated 80-90 trillion dollars.

Ryan talks about what he calls “maximalist hubris” and why he believes both Ethereum and Bitcoin can co-exist and both have massive upside. He explains why he believes that Ethereum is about 30% finished, Bitcoin is about 80% finished, and why in judging their probabilities of success, one should look at the finished end state and discount from there based on the probability of executing.

They also talk about Web3 and why digital scarcity is the key innovation contained within it. They explain why people tend to overestimate the extent to which Web3 will disrupt Web 2.0 and why Web3 will instead disrupt the industries and companies that weren’t disrupted by Web 2.0 in the first place.

The three discuss why one should think about work or utility tokens as analogous to taxicab medallions, which are similar to money — but that no coffee shop in NYC would accept in exchange for a coffee.

They also talk about what other protocols still have a chance to be the “winning money,” tokenized securities, and the potential drawbacks of stablecoins.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Kevin Kwok (@kevinakwok) is an investor at Greylock and one of the most expansive and intriguing minds around. In this episode Kevin and Erik talk about... basically everything, from the org chart of the future to the history of religion.

Along the way they discuss a number of topics, including:

- Why the stock market exists and why after the crash of 2008 no one said that we should shut it down.
- Why Amazon is starting to look like Berkshire Hathaway and whether it could be broken up and still run effectively.
- The ideas of "loops and funnels" and "constraints and compounding" — and how Kevin thinks about those mental models.
- The history of corporate structures and what they might look like in the future.
- What might be possible with crypto that was previously impossible without crypto, and why people seem to be only trying to replicate already-existing tech using crypto.
- Twitter, and why it's like being "on chain."
- How to think about your career and how the Valley's unique work culture has contributed to its success.
- The idea of personal ICOs.
- Why most companies think about the impact of PR on consumers when in reality they should think about PR's impact on recruiting.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Kelsey Mellard (@KelseyMellard), co-founder of Sitka (trustsitka.com) and Kristin Spohn (@kbakes), partner at Social Capital, join Erik for this enlightening episode of Health Stories.

In it they talk about a number of topics related to go-to-market for startups in the health industry. Kelsey explains what Sitka is trying to do in the musculoskeletal space, which is the #1 cause of disability in the US.

They discuss the misaligned incentives in healthcare and the interplay of the various stakeholders that have an input into an individual's care. They explain why cost of care varies so much based on your ZIP code.

Kristin and Kelsey talk about the types of startups they'd like to see in the healthcare space and where the opportunities are at this point in time. They also talk about some of the potential pitfalls and what founders can do to succeed.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode of Venture Stories, Erik talks to David Vorick (@DavidVorick) of Sia.

David explains why a fork of Sia became necessary, even though doing so was not ideal or their preferred option.

He talks about what precipitated the fork and how they came to the decision. He recounts his outreach to ASIC manufacturers and why their actions were problematic. They move on to a more general discussion of the philosophy on when to fork or not and how to manage doing so.

David also gives an overview of what it takes to manufacture chips, which incumbent chipmakers might be able to move into ASICs and why a manufacturer might produce $300M worth of wafers before even knowing whether they will be functional.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner Erik Torenberg, and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Aleksandr Bulkin (@coinfund_al), co-founder of CoinFund and creator of ADAPT (adaptk.it) joins Erik on this episode to discuss:

- How Alex got involved in crypto and why the Ethereum white paper and Augur white paper contributed so much to his interest.
- His time working at Goldman Sachs on human-computer interaction and how he transitioned from Goldman to the crypto world, as well his predictions on where Goldman will be disrupted and where it will stick around in a new crypto-oriented world.
- How he got started on ADAPT, how it works, and what the promise of ADAPT is.
- What an "initial witness offering" is and how it compares to other initial offerings in crypto.
- Why he's skeptical of value capture via TCRs and governance in crypto.
- The reason that he thinks a decentralized, paid Wikipedia will fail.
- What "cost of attack" means and how it affects crypto projects.
- The idea of UX security, and why it is equally as important as technical security.

Articles mentioned in this episode:

Quantifying Decentralization by Balaji Srinivasan: https://news.earn.com/quantifying-decentralization-e39db233c28e

Scalability of value in decentralized networks by Aleksandr Bulkin: https://blog.coinfund.io/scalability-of-value-in-decentralized-networks-795ed9c91eee

Can Tokens Save Lives? by Aleksandr Bulkin: https://blog.coinfund.io/can-tokens-save-lives-8c0f1cf5dfa9

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner Erik Torenberg, and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Glen Weyl (@glenweyl) and Riva Melissa-Tez (@rivatez) join Erik for this episode. They discuss Glen’s book, Radical Markets, and a number of topics related to it, including:

- The similarities between Rio de Janeiro and San Francisco when it comes to wealth distribution
- Why Glen has received blame and praise on different issues from both sides of the political spectrum
- Why the book appeals primarily not to the right or the left, but to the open-minded
- The reason that Glen calls himself a social technologist
- How Glen came to meet Vitalik Buterin and how they ended up writing a paper together, which Glen calls “the single thing I’m most proud of intellectually”
- Skeptical perspectives on blockchain and cryptocurrency, and why Glen calls them “a society of absolute private property governed by plutocracy”
- “The problem of funding public goods without having to pre-suppose that it’s all going to be done by some particular democratic government somewhere.”
- Why Glen thinks the news media is the best opportunity for decentralized funding
- The idea that “economics is a disguise for the interests of a narrow part of society.”
- Glen’s relationship with Jaron Lanier and his admiration of Jaron as a thinker
- Glen and Riva’s requests for startups
- Evolving the idea of human capital

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner Erik Torenberg, and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Nick Reber of Oscar Health and Kareem Zaki (@KareemZaki_) of Thrive Capital join Erik in this fascinating episode exploring the ins and outs of the health insurance industry.

They talk about the misaligned incentives in healthcare and why it maybe shouldn’t be the case that “most people trust their doctor and hate their insurance company.”

Nick and Kareem break down why it’s difficult for new entrants to get a foothold in the market and talk about the barriers to competition created by legislation that dates back to World War II.

They discuss why there is such a difference between the healthcare plans that people get through their employers versus the ones people opt for when they are selecting a plan on their own.

They predict a transition ahead in the health insurance industry that is analogous to the shift from defined benefit to defined contribution pension plans.

They also talk about why insurance "is one of the worst ways to pay for anything" and their requests for startups in the space.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Myles Snider (@myles_snider), CEO of Aurora EOS and advisor to Multicoin Capital, joins Erik and co-host Tony Sheng to discuss his new role as head of a block producer for EOS.

Co-host Tony Sheng (@tonysheng) leads product at Decentraland. He also publishes analyses on the business and strategy of crypto at www.tonysheng.com and is one of Village’s Network Leaders.

Myles explains how he ended up in that position after working at Multicoin Capital. He gives us an overview of EOS and talks about how it compares and contrasts to Ethereum. He also gives a history of the protocol.

Myles explains what it means to be “decentralized enough” and why he doesn’t think of EOS as either a cryptocurrency or sound money.

They talk about the role of block producers and how the governance structure of EOS is set up, including how financial incentives might lead more people to become involved in governance. Myles explains why he decided to become a block producer as opposed to a number of other things he might have done within the ecosystem. He also talks about why he sees himself as a “usability maximalist.”

Why Decentralization Matters by Myles Snider: https://medium.com/multicoin-capital/why-decentralization-matters-a-response-6b4b9a31367f

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

It's double the Sriram Krishnan for the price of one! Sriram Krishnan (@sriramk) of Twitter and Sriram Krishnan (@sriramkri) of HeadSpin join Erik to talk about dating apps, streaming music, the online advertising business, as well as the hilarious stories about people mixing up the two of them.

They start off by recounting some of the times their identical names have gotten one or the other in trouble for something the other Sriram Krishnan did, as well as the hilarious story of them both showing up to the same meeting where the host only expected one.

The crew talks about Tinder and whether someone else might come along to dethrone the app that's created a whole new way to date. They also talk about the digitization of everything and what else in the relationships space might end up online as well.

They move on to Spotify and streaming music in general, breaking down why Spotify emerged from the other side of the world to take on and beat (for now) huge companies like Apple and Amazon, including all of the music labels.

Next, they talk about India and the unique dynamics inside the country for entrepreneurs and consumers. In many ways consumer tech is more advanced in India than in the USA and entrepreneurs are often looking up to the Chinese companies and founders rather than American ones.

They discuss advertising online with Sriram giving a crash course on how advertising online has evolved from the beginning to now. They also discuss how Facebook was able to lock down the mobile ad market and the path forward for Snap when it comes to ads.

At the end there is some bonus discussion of Lebron and some other basketball-related predictions.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In this episode, Erik is joined by two very smart minds in the health space. He talks to Rachel Craig (@RPCraig), founder and CEO of MotionHall, which a Village Global portfolio company that is building a global platform for biopharma dealmaking, and Ed Saltzman, President and founder of Defined Health, which is a business development strategy consultancy in the life sciences space.

Erik asks why now is such an exciting time to be involved in the life sciences field and how it has evolved over time to this point. Rachel and Ed explain to us why they’re excited and why they also have concerns and describe where they would be investing if they were running a venture capital fund.

They talk about the continuing crossover of life sciences and technology tools, especially in software, and how the two worlds (one almost entirely regulated, the other entirely un-regulated) can better understand each other.

They also talk about what their “requests for products” are and give their advice for founders in the space, including this nugget from Rachel — “run towards hard things and love complexity.”

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at www.villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik and his co-host Tony Sheng are joined by two special guests for this episode. Lily Liu (@calilyliu) is co-founder of Earn.com which was sold to Coinbase. Jillian Carlson (@_jillruth) is a consultant to projects both big and small in the space.

Co-host Tony Sheng (@tonysheng) leads product at Decentraland. He also publishes analyses on the business and strategy of crypto at tonysheng.com and is one of Village’s Network Leaders.

Erik starts by asking what each of Lily and Jillian are thinking about these days and what's been top of mind for the last while for them. Lily's been thinking about how the blockchain can be used internationally and Jillian has been thinking about how to make blockchain and crypto actually useful to end users.

They have a discussion of Venezuela and its effort to create a state-sponsored cryptocurrency. They discuss the idea of getting blockchain to scale by adding blockchain tech to existing projects that already have scale instead of creating something entirely new.

They have an enlightening discussion about business model innovation compared to protocol innovation. They say that much of the protocol innovation will happen in the US and the business model innovation is likely to happen in Asia. There is discussion of the risks of creating projects on top of Ethereum as well as of the risks of creating your own coin and holding your funds in that coin.

They also talk about why the sharing economy is well-positioned to have blockchain integrated into it and Lily explains why she thinks that despite the correction in prices we're still not in a bear market yet. Finally, they discuss personal ICOs and the rise of crypto hedge funds.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Mahmoud "Rusty" Abdelkader (@mahmoudimus), CEO of Very Good Security and Ross Fubini (@fubini), partner at Village Global, join Erik on this episode to talk security on the web and Mahmoud's company Very Good Security.

Mahmoud explains what he and his team is trying to do at Very Good Security and how they hope to transform the way web apps are secured.

Ross has known Mahmoud for a while now and explains why he decided to invest in Mahmoud and his company. They run through the unique aspects of the business that Mahmoud describes as “an infrastructure business disguised as SaaS.” The three also talk about the opportunities in the space and candidly discuss the challenges that VGS and Mahmoud as CEO see ahead of them.

For example, Mahmoud asks “how do you hire someone to do a job you don’t know how to do yourself?” They discuss going into the trenches to do the job yourself first so you can understand it. Mahmoud also gets into some of the engineering behind VGS and why he had to give up his motorcycle.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Three exciting guests join Erik to reveal what having been in the healthcare ecosystem has taught them that the average tech investor doesn't know:

- Liz Rockett (@liz_rockett), investor at Kaiser Permanente Ventures.
- Ryan Panchadsaram (@rypan), investor at Kleiner Perkins and former US deputy CTO.
- Jared Seehafer (@seehafer), co-founder of Enzyme and Village Network Leader

Erik starts by asking each of them to describe their view on the healthcare industry from their unique individual backgrounds as an investor, a former White House staffer, and an entrepreneur.

They play a game of overrated vs. underrated where they name a technology, sub-sector (or even a piece of legislation!) and discuss whether it's over- or underrated.

The three guests explain why in healthcare "if you build it, they may not come" and why brilliant technology that solves a clinical problem may still fail. They talk about how healthcare is "multivariate complex interactions of people" and why upstarts need to keep in mind how their technology fits into a current workflow, whether it will be used, and who's going to reimburse for it.

They also talk about their "requests for products" that they would like to see built in the space and why "the people who have done the best [in healthcare] have found a way to steep themselves in it before they build too much." They tell prospective founders that they need to build a team that has seen every side of the problem and come to the space with humility and an open, "beginner's mind."

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

The guests on today’s episode are Spencer Noon (@spencernoon), an investor at Doggie Tail Crypto Capital and Cyrus Younessi (@cyounessi1), Director of Research and Trading at Scalar Capital.

Co-hosting today’s episode is Tony Sheng (@tonysheng) who leads product at Decentraland. He also publishes analyses on the business and strategy of crypto at tonysheng.com and is one of Village’s Network Leaders.

Spencer and Cyrus start out by laying out the theses underlying their bullishness on Ethereum. They give some context on Ethereum through a historical lens and discuss the properties that lend it to scaling well. They also debunk some of the common misconceptions about Ethereum.

The four talk about where they would like to see development focused within the Ethereum ecosystem, what obstacles Ethereum faces, and what an Ethereum-killer might look like.

They also discuss smart contracts and where Spencer and Cyrus disagree with the fat money crowd on the relative merits of Ethereum vs. Bitcoin as a store of value or as working capital.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik and co-host for this episode Ash Fontana (@ashfontana) of Zetta Venture Partners interview Ali Hamed (@AliBHamed), investor at CoVenture.

Ali gives us a primer on the online lending space and compares and contrasts it to offline lending. He explains why payday lenders with astronomical APRs actually have small margins. He also talks about how government can improve the regulatory environment to allow for more disruption of traditional lending and help new companies get a foothold.

They talk about crypto and whether people will be making loans against Bitcoin anytime soon as well as the idea of personal ICOs and why Ali thinks they are a bad idea.

The trio finish with a rapid-fire round where Erik names a venture firm and Ali talks about what he thinks that company should do in the future.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Joining Erik for this episode are Robert Mittendorff (@doctorrem), partner at Norwest Venture Partners, and Ambar Bhattacharyya (@AmbarBh), managing director at Maverick Ventures.

In a continuation of the Requests for Startups series, Erik asks Robert and Ambar what they would like to see built in the digital health space.

They discuss which spaces are underdeveloped and are ripe for opportunities versus which spaces don't have room for new entrants. The unique nature of the regulatory environment in health can be a roadblock to new firms so they discuss topics around that and how it impacts startups in the space.

They talk about why AI is actually under-hyped in the health space why they say it's "first half of the first inning" when it comes to digital therapeutics.

The two also discuss former podcast guest Malay Ghandi's article about whether it's better to work within the system or outside of it when building a company in healthcare and explain why "you want to act like a wolf but look like a sheep."

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

On this episode Erik talks to Jonathan Cheeseman (@JonathanCheesm4), Chief Market Strategist at Distributed Global and Herve Bizira (@hibizira), CTO of Distributed Global.

They talk about crypto markets and the funds that have been created to take advantage of a new investment opportunity. John and Herve explain what they are trying to do at Distributed Global and the unique combination of tech and finance they use to evaluate crypto assets at the micro and macro level.

They explain what reflexivity means in markets in general and how price and momentum have an outsized impact on crypto assets. They discuss the problem of liquidity in crypto markets and the large percentage of retail investors involved in crypto and the unique forces those factors create in the crypto markets.

They also discuss how traditional finance may or may not be displaced by crypto, why decentralization can be over-hyped and the international crypto landscape.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Andrew Cronk (@ajcronk), partner at Figment, joins Erik again for this bonus episode going into generalized mining. Andrew contrasts sending someone money via PayPal with sending someone money via a decentralized network.

He talks about whether firms with different approaches in the space can co-exist and what it means to be a validator. He discusses why it's important for a firm to be an active participant in a network.

Andrew also explains how and why they've set up Figment to be itself a decentralized firm with no office and individuals working around the world.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Nicholas Chirls (@nchirls), partner at Notation Capital, and Joe Lallouz (@JoeLallouz), entrepreneur, angel, and founder of Grand St.

They explain how they got their start in the space and the genesis of their respective firms. They talk about generalized mining and how a firm might get into mining.

They discuss the various crypto networks and talk about how the way an investment firm provides value to a crypto company has changed. Nicholas and Joe also talk about traditional VC firms and how theymight get into the mining space.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Dandelion Mane (@decentralion), founder of SourceCred, joins Erik on this mind-expanding episode about identity. Dandelion explains how they came upon the idea for a decentralized reputation system and how it could change how people live — both online and in the real world.

Dandelion explains some potential improvements that could be made to online communities to improve the level of discourse and avoid the outrage mobs that are currently too prevalent in those communities.

They also talk about a number of other topics around identity in general, like how one's name affects how you think, the many sides of any given person, and why you should choose your own name.

Mentioned In This Episode:

- Seeing Like A State by James Scott

- Black Mirror Season 3 Episode 1: Nosedive

- Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom by Cory Doctorow

- Accelerando by Charles Stross

- Homesteading in the Noosphere by Eric Raymond

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In this episode Erik and co-host Miles Snyder of Multicoin Capital talk to Ameen Soleimani (@ameensol), CEO at SpankChain, and Jehan Tremback (@JTremback), founder of Althea Mesh.

Ameen is one of the inventors of a token-curated registry. He discusses what a token-curated registry is, what the current use cases for them are and what they could possibly be in the future.

They talk about AdChain and the problem of advertising fraud online. The three of them discuss the "chicken and egg" problem that TCRs face. They also get into what kinds of uses Jehan could have for TCRs for the physical world at his company, Althea.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In this episode Erik talks to Aparna Krishnan (@aparnalocked), co-founder of Mechanism Labs and Haseeb Qureshi (@hosseeb), GP at MetaStable Capital.

They discuss a number of themes around Aparna's research paper, talk about what it means to find consensus, and they go through the various protocols that exist now to try and do that. They also talk about what kinds of applications these various protocols could have.

They explain what a block is, what proof of work and proof of stake mean, and why the longest chain rule could be a potential pitfall for Bitcoin.

Reading List For This Episode:

Non- Technical:
- MultiChain's blog
- Ashley Lannquist’s blog
- https://www.jbs.cam.ac.uk/fileadmin/user_upload/research/centres/alternative-finance/downloads/2018-08-20-conceptualising-dlt-systems.pdf
- https://eprint.iacr.org/2017/375.pdf

Technical (new to the space):
- cryptoeconomics.study
- Vitalik’s blog posts
- Mechanism Labs blog, GitHub
- Blockchain at Berkeley blog and educational content

Looking to get into research:
- Consensus: https://github.com/Mechanism-Labs/MetaAnalysis-of-Alternative-Consensus-Protocols/blob/master/MetaAnalysis.pdf, https://arxiv.org/pdf/1711.03936.pdf
- Privacy/ Security: https://arxiv.org/pdf/1706.00916.pdf
- Smart Contracts: https://eprint.iacr.org/2018/192.pdf
- IC3!

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Nik Bhatia (@timevalueofbtc), writer and Bitcoin thinker, joins Erik and co-host Myles Snider of Multicoin Capital on this episode to talk layers of Bitcoin and the Lightning network.

Nik explains how he got his start in the Bitcoin world from traditional finance. They explain the various layers of money and Bitcoin.

They also talk about whether there will be fractional reserve ownership of Bitcoin, whether Bitcoin banks might exist someday and when a Bitcoin ETF might make an appearance.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Elena Nadolinski (@leanthebean), an engineer interested in the privacy space, and Howard Wu (@1HowardWu), co-founder of Dekrypt Capital, talk to Erik on this episode about zero-knowledge proofs and privacy.

They talk about why privacy is important in general and the benefits of privacy in the crypto world. They explain what a zero-knowledge proof is and Howard talks about some of the more recent developments in cryptography.

They get into how ZKPs are being used today and the promise they hold for future applications.
Elena and Howard also get into the differences between privacy coins.

Quotable lines from this episode:

"Privacy is one of those things where people don’t appreciate it until they don’t have it."
-HW

"Just because a friend of mine and I shared a coffee, doesn’t mean I get to have the right to see all of their transactions. If we were to live in a world where all we used were cryptocurrency blockchains to do all our computations, I would basically be able to see all the transactions of all time from all the people I’ve ever interacted with." -EN

"How do you ensure the integrity of a computation, especially one you outsource to a server elsewhere?" - HW

"Zero-knowledge proofs basically allow you to say 'I can’t tell you the secret but I can prove to you that I know the secret.'" - HW

"Scalability is like the offense on a football team and privacy is like the defense on the football team. They’re both equally important but the quarterback is much more sexy than the defense." -HW

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik's guests for this episode are:

- Andrew Cronk (@ajcronk), partner at Figment
- Meher Roy (@MeherRoy), co-founder of Chorus One
- Jake Brukhman (@jbrukh), founder of CoinFund

They talk about a number of interesting topics, including the unique way that an investment firm participates in the growth of a company in the crypto world and why it's more important to be a network participant than just a funder.

The four of them go through what a validator is and what being one entails. They talk about the big differences in people composition of a crypto fund versus a typical VC fund and they explain what kind of expertise the people at a crypto fund need to have.

The group also discusses evaluating crypto networks, the relative importance of "user experience" vs. "developer experience" and what it means to have LPs and institutional investors paying attention to the space.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Michael Goldstein (@bitstein), president of the Nakamoto Institute and co-host of the Noded Podcast, joins Erik on this episode. Between him and Erik they break down some of the basic concepts around Bitcoin and explain why it's important in general.

Michael explains why he's keen to feast on the tears of nocoiners and breaks down a number of the common misconceptions about Bitcoin. He also talks Austrian economics and potential roadblocks for Bitcoin.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Arianna Simpson (@AriannaSimpson), VC and managing director at Autonomous Partners and Travis Kling (@Travis_Kling) of Ikigai Asset Management join Erik on this episode.

Arianna starts by explaining her post about false precision and why you don't want to be "very precisely wrong." They talk various models and calculations and how to value different crypto assets.

They also talk about Bitcoin maximalists, what the landscape of crypto networks looks like, and whether the huge trades made in the past few years on crypto merit the creation of a fund to try to replicate those returns in the future.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Elena Nadolinski (@leanthebean), an engineer interested in the privacy space, and Avichal Garg (@avichal), Managing Partner at Electric Capital, join Erik on this episode to discuss privacy coins. They break down what a privacy coin is and why privacy is important in crypto.

They talk about the three main privacy coins: Monero, Zcash and Grin — and discuss why it's important or not to have an auditable record of transactions, whether people will pay taxes, and whether the government will be able to penetrate a privacy coin.

They discuss whether people will care about privacy given that less than 3% of all cryptocurrency transactions are done with a privacy coin. Avichal points out that perhaps not a lot of people will care about privacy but a large amount of dollars will.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Colin Campbell is our audio engineer and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

This episode of Venture Stories is co-hosted by Dani Grant (@thedanigrant), analyst at USV.

She talks with three leaders in the distributed computing space:

- Dan Desjardins, CEO of Distributed Compute Labs
- Chandler Song (@chandlersyf), founder and CEO of Ankr Network
- Greg Osuri (@GregOsuri), founder of Akash Network and CEO of Overclock Labs

They talk about what distributed computing is, why it has so much potential and why this is an exciting time to be involved in the space.

The guests talk about what kinds of applications are enabled by distributed computing and how for example, a hospital can leverage the computing power of all of its computers that are sitting idle at night to do medical research.

They discuss the different ways to compensate users for the use of their computer resources and the different approaches to distributing problems and tasks to distributed resources.

They also discuss the challenges facing their companies and how to think about competing or not competing with incumbents like Amazon and Google.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik's co-host for this episode is Myles Snider (@myles_snider), research associate at Multicoin Capital. They talk to Haseeb Qureshi (@hosseeb) who is a GP at MetaStable Capital.

They discuss where stablecoins are now and envision what they could be in the future. They compare and contrast stablecoins and fiat and explain why someone would hold a stablecoin that's indexed to fiat.

They talk about some of the applications for stablecoins and the different kinds of stablecoins. The trio also discuss why you would want to invest in a stablecoin, what the Oracle Problem is and how it could be solved, as well as what kinds of hurdles stand in the way of widespread usage of stablecoins.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global, is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg and is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Saifedean Ammous (@saifedean), the author of The Bitcoin Standard: The Decentralized Alternative to Central Banking, joins Erik for a very interesting and highly quotable interview.

He expands on a number of topics from his book but also gets into a lot that isn’t in the book. He recounts the story of money from an Austrian perspective and describes why the world never really had a complete gold standard. Saif explains how government became addicted to printing money, how Bitcoin could turn out to be a better version of gold and how it might replace central banks entirely.

Saif talks about why Silicon Valley has been and may still be mistaken about Bitcoin and blockchain, and why the analogies of the early days of the internet don’t really apply. He also talks about why the blockchain as a concept has been overhyped and why Bitcoin won’t be as instantaneous and low-fee as you might think.

He also talks about what kinds of threats Bitcoin might face, how the world will change when Bitcoin becomes the new standard, and how personal finance and capitalism might evolve in a Bitcoin world.

(Murray Rothbard is the economist that Saif references early in the episode).

Quotable lines from this episode:

“You can’t omit the fact that you took a sledgehammer to the laptop before complaining that it doesn’t work.”

“Ever since then it’s been a wild ride of governments having discovered this addiction to printing money to finance themselves to do everything.”

“It’s a choice for people to opt-out of the modern nation state with all of its hefty bill that it sends you every year in the form of inflation.”

“Gold’s emergence as a money happens on the market, not because of government decree.”

“You can’t systematize human action and behavior into mathematical equations that allow you do calculations to predict an outcome.”

“The real problem is the fascination with all the buzzwords around all these projects that hang around Bitcoin pretending to be the next big thing, which we’ve been seeing since the beginning of Bitcoin. It’s the same story always and always ends in the same sad way.”

“Everybody wants everything to do everything they’ve ever read in a sci-fi novel.”

“Everybody is not capable of reasoning just beyond an analogy.”

“People think of Bitcoin as a brand… and it’s only natural to think that if it’s Pepsi, it’s going to have its Coca-Cola — but we have the internet, and we don’t have another competitor, because it’s a protocol.”

“All of these other uses that people want to attach to blockchain, I humbly submit the thesis that none of them actually matter.”

“I don’t conduct criminal activity but if I did I would definitely make sure I would not record it on a ledger accessible to millions of people instantaneously around the world.”

“Without a lender of last resort, fractional reserve banking is not going to work.”

“Every cent of investment will have to come from a cent of saving and people think that’s a horrible thing, but that’s a great thing, it’s how any society thrives.”

“The laws of economics don’t stop functioning just because government just said they should stop functioning in that sector.”

“Capital is just a market good like any other, there’s supply and there’s demand.”

“The amount of gold today that is held in global central banks is many times larger than what was held in central banks during the time of the gold standard.”

“If governments want to kill Bitcoin I think the best strategy would be to return to the gold standard and to offer everybody free markets in banking.”

“I know it’s cool to go around on college campuses and talk about destroying capitalism and all of that stuff but really it makes no sense. It’s an insane kind of suicidal death wish.”

-

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Vijay Boyapati (@real_vijay), software engineer, crypto thinker and proponent of Austrian economics, joins Erik on this episode to talk about a number of interesting topics.

They start with a primer on Austrian economics, what makes it different from other schools of economics, and why economics is a unique science with different schools of thought — “there isn’t a Chicago school of physics or a Marxist school of chemistry.”

Vijay speculates on why Austrian economics has become a niche school of economics and analyzes Bitcoin and current economic policy through the lens of Austrian economics. He gives his opinion on the fed, fractional reserve banking and debunks some misconceptions that people have about Bitcoin.

They finish with a lightning round discussing what famous economists like Hayek or Friedman would think about Bitcoin. Vijay also discusses the Bitmain IPO and what Facebook entering the cryptocurrency space might mean for the “incumbents.”

Quotable lines from this episode:

“You look at academia and there’s probably 10 Keynesian economists for every Chicago economist and there’s probably 10 Chicago economists for every Austrian economist.”

“It’s sad that political expediency has trumped the pursuit of truth.”

“There isn’t like a Chicago school of physics or a Marxist school of chemistry.”

“Austrians really believe that an economy grows through investment, capital formation and entrepreneurial activities [rather than through consumption].”

“The monetary premium is the value and purchasing power that it has that isn’t explained by its use value.”

“All monies throughout history are bubbles and the bubbles don’t necessarily need to pop.”

“I think it’s [Bitcoin] the most important innovation in money in a thousand years.”

“The thing that’s exciting about Bitcoin is that it gives you a property right but doesn’t require anyone to enforce that property right.”

-

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by two very exciting guests for this episode — Bill Tai, venture capitalist and director at Bitfury, and Derek Hsue (@derek_hsue), investor at Blockchain Capital.

The three have a very engaging discussion about the mining landscape in cryptocurrencies, the similarities and differences between now and the early growth of the semiconductor industry, as well as the issues, obstacles and misconceptions standing in the way of new entrants to the mining sector.

They get into the details on mining operations, how the architecture of certain coins impacts the equipment that mining can be done on, and how the underlying math is different between Ethereum and Bitcoin.

There are also a number of impromptu history lessons courtesy of Bill, including how Wall Street got its name and went from a place to trade furs to the NYSE of today.

They also discuss the future of exchanges, why buying into an ICO means buying into a community and a belief rather than something immediately valuable, and why we are headed for a massive reset of capitalism.

Quotable lines from this episode:

“In the start it’s kind of like riding a little bicycle and you see a pothole, you just go around it, but pretty soon you’re driving a freight train on a track and you can’t get off.” - BT

“You’re going to have to come up with a check for 50-100 million dollars to be noticed by a semiconductor fab.” - BT

“An upstart two years from now is probably going to have to take down 1000 megawatts just to start.” - BT

“It’s really hard to get a venture type return from a mining operation, unless you’re really early on in a chain, or just extremely, much better than everyone else at producing hardware.” - DH

“It all boiled down to, can you bribe a politician with an empty city in China to give you his power plant for a bit of money every month? …It turns out that Ethereum is a more concentrated mining ecosystem than Bitcoin.” - BT

“Programming in Bitcoin is a bit like programming in assembly or DOS, where Ethereum is like programming in a high-level language that anyone that has done an iPhone app can work with.” - BT

“If you look at the largest asset managers in the world, they don’t have a huge incentive to trade in a peer-to-peer manner.” - DH

“It’s not about creating a product that is tailored to the world’s current behavior, it’s about providing that option for non-custodial and a trustless financial interaction.” - DH

“We’re at that point today where we’re all standing under that buttonwood tree with our virtual assets, trying to figure out where to go.” - BT

“The total of all debt in the world is 275 trillion, which is 3.18 times world GDP, it’s growing at 25 trillion a year, and is growing way faster than world GDP is growing.” - BT

-

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik and his co-host Tony Sheng (@tonysheng) of Decentraland interview Nic Carter (@nic__carter), partner at Castle Island Ventures and co-founder of Coinmetrics.io.

Nic explains why Bitcoin might end up like gold, where everyday people have little day-to-day interaction with it but it has a big influence on the monetary system, and how Bitcoin can be a check on the behavior of central banks.

He explains why he started Castle Island Ventures, explains its philosophy and how they plan to invest. He also explains his take on Bitcoin, Ethereum, and whether any of the altcoins will turn out to be worth anything.

He explains why he is bearish on DAOs in the short-term but in the long-term is very bullish. Nic also talks about how projects can improve their governance structures and how users can spot potential governance problems within projects.

Quotable lines from this episode:

“You don’t need the ‘gold standard’ to be the day to day currency, just like in the era of the gold standard people didn’t transact in units of gold.”

“I eventually think we’ll get to this world where we have the advantages of the cryptocurrency capital raise mechanisms together with the guarantees of equity — we just need to marry those concepts.”

“I’m kind of heretical in that I think there is a really big role for financial institutions to play in the crypto asset story.”

“I think that voting makes people feel more comfortable being governed because they think they have buy-in into the governance system.”

“The highest ROI on these projects is transparency — to be so transparent that it hurts.”

-

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Trent McConaghy (@trentmc0) returns for another interview with Erik. He’s the founder of Ocean Protocol and BigchainDB.

In this episode, he starts by explaining Ocean Protocol’s mission and gives us a history of how the overall philosophy of the web has changed over the years, going from what could be called Web 1 to Web 2.0 to the yet-to-be-written story of Web 3. He explains how the web started out as a tool for democratizing access and how Web 2.0 created some undesirable effects when it comes to the siloing of information, questions about privacy, and the prevalence of advertising. Trent is hopeful though that Web 3 will be a return to the roots of Web 1.

He lays out a compelling case for why several of the web’s biggest names should be tokenized and how that will remedy the current case of misaligned incentives between company and users.

Trent also helps us imagine a world where AI and blockchain are working to amplify each other and what kinds of changes for society that might portend. He explains a number of scenarios related to digitally autonomous organizations, self-driving cars, road infrastructure, medicine and art.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Balaji Srinivasan (@balajis), CTO of Coinbase, joined Erik on stage in San Francisco at the Founders Embassy Borderless Summit in June 2018 for a fascinating conversation about the coming impact of blockchain technology. They discuss how the world will change as work and entertainment — but especially finance — become virtual. Balaji explains why governments will need to compete for the best individuals and explains the new role of government in a “borderless” world.

He also discusses his recent exits and his new role as CTO of Coinbase. Balaji gives his surprising advice for new grads looking to start a company and explains why your “personal burn rate” is one of the most important metrics to track. Erik talks to Balaji about Balaji's lesser known history buff side and they discuss world finance, world history, and China.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Today’s guest is Jimmy Song (@jimmysong), crypto developer and teacher. He is a venture partner at Blockchain Capital and creator of the Programming Blockchain course.

Jimmy has been a crypto developer for a long time now (in crypto terms), teaches programming blockchain, and has written a number of influential posts on crypto. He talks about how he got into crypto and what about it was so appealing to him. He explains how an economic lens, rather than a technical lens, is what brought him to blockchain.

Jimmy and Erik discuss the merits of Bitcoin versus other coins, why Jimmy believes Bitcoin will win, and what misconceptions VCs have about blockchain. They discuss what makes a good store of value, the biological impulse humans have to hoard that which is scarce and the potential impact of Bitcoin 30 years from now. They also discuss a good amount of economic history, what makes a true “hard money” as well as why war led to the gold standard going away.

To apply for a scholarship for Jimmy’s Programming Blockchain course, visit www.programmingblockchain.com.

Quotable lines from this episode:

“Money is strengthened when it doesn’t change whereas tech is strengthened when you iterate and try different things and see what works for the market.”

“The big thing that Bitcoin brings to the market is hard money, which is what disappeared when Roosevelt seized gold and all that other stuff.”

“It’s not just armies against armies, it’s entire countries against entire countries now, very literally speaking, because the government can take away all the money and wealth away from the populace and use that for their war effort.”

“You don’t have to believe that it has value, it’s enough that other people value it. I might not value Bitcoin but as long as other people value Bitcoin I will value Bitcoin.”

“The things that make it a good medium of exchange are totally different than what makes it a store of value.”

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Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In a first-ever two-hour episode for Venture Stories by Village Global, Erik talks to two of the most interesting crypto thinkers around: Arjun Balaji (@arjunblj), crypto investor, trader and incubator, and Murad Mahmudov (@MustStopMurad), crypto analyst and angel investor.

In this wide-ranging and mind-expanding interview, the three discuss a number of topics relating to cryptocurrencies, effects on government, economic history, and predictions for the future, among many other things including:

- The arguments for Bitcoin over other cryptocurrencies and whether Bitcoin can be toppled
- Why Bitcoin is less like digital gold and more like “digital nuclear weapons”
- Whether Bitcoin will be “the MySpace of money”
- A history of the Austrian school of economics
- The impacts of hard forks on a community
- How competition between monies accelerates capitalism
- Whether blockchain as a technology is overrated or underrated
- The parallels between cryptocurrency and the Asian construction bubble
- Institutional movement into cryptocurrencies
- The psyche of crypto hedge fund managers
- How crypto changes how countries compete for tax revenues

Quotable lines from this episode:

“The creation of a non-sovereign sound money system has the potential to be one of the most significant events in our lifetime.” - AB

“I view money as a good, just like anything else, and I don’t believe we have pure capitalism until we have competition among currencies.” - MM

“Cryptocurrencies in general and in particular Bitcoin are a higher quality form of money.” - MM

“Through the fat money lens, all tokens are cryptocurrencies.” - AB

“The whole market is like a prediction market for which one or few coins will be the long term money winner.” - MM

“Bitcoin is the Schelling point of the market”. - MM

“Despite all the fancy bells and whistles that blockchains enable, the fact that nobody can print more Bitcoin is the greatest innovation here.” - MM

“The idea that money has to be continuously in circulation is completely non-sensical.” -MM

“We’re not trying to build another PayPal here, we’re trying to disrupt central banking.” -MM

“Miners don’t control Bitcoin, businesses don’t control bitcoin, users and full nodes control Bitcoin.” - AB

“As time goes on, everyone is going to become a Bitcoin maximalist whether they like it or not.” - MM

“The number one thing that we can learn from economic history is that if there is an actor that can create more money, they will.” - AB

“If there’s free competition around money then the market would never naturally converge around something [the US Dollar] that is expanding at 6% a year. It’s totally irrational.”

“Just as we witnessed the separation of church and state, in the next 20-30 years we are going to witness the separation of money and state.” - MM

“People who say capitalism is dead or that we are entering the end of capitalism don’t know what they are talking about, because capitalism is going to go into overdrive.” -AB

“What previously took a 200-person team in 2000, took a 100-person team in 2007 and takes a 5- or 10-person team now.” - AB

“We’re entering an era where businesses will be able to be built and run on the internet by one person.” - AB

“These tokens suck as money or are absolutely and utterly useless.” -MM

“Almost all of these tokens were unethical fundraising scams by the founders.” - MM

“This whole thing [the ICO boom] was a form of IQ arbitrage, where people took advantage of these overvalued shit tokens… Do you want to walk around New York and use a different form of currency at each store?” - MM

“Erik, if you’re looking to hold your wealth in the equivalent of gift cards to the Gap, I’ve got a bridge to sell you.” - AB

“The hype around blockchain is nothing more than an indicator that Silicon Valley is largely oriented less around the original counterculture movement and much moreso positioned as a form of opportunistic greed behaviours.” - AB

“The monetary premium that is embedded inside [altcoins] is purely psychosocial, it’s purely cognitive. It’s almost like an ongoing hallucination of our collective unconsciousness.” - MM

“The recurring selling of narratives that Murad mentioned is the core business of most crypto hedge funds. They’re not active traders, they’re just early investors that then sell the dream and then sell their bags on many retail investors.” - AB

“One of my favourite things that Murad has ever said is that blockchains don’t create revenues, they destroy revenues.” - AB

“If your product is open source and your rent is too high, you risk getting forked or re-architected by someone else charging less, and it becomes a race to the bottom.” - MM

“Let’s be honest, on-chain governance is essentially the rule of the rich.” - MM

“No governance is the best governance, or at least for neo-gold.” - MM

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Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Joining Erik for this episode are Felix Feng (‪@felix2feng)‬, founder of Set Protocol and Nadav Hollander (@NadavAHollander), founder of Dharma Protocol.

Felix and Nadav explain their respective companies and what they are looking to do for the open financial system. They talk about how the coming wave of decentralization in financial services will bring the same accessibility and ease of use that individuals are accustomed to with Web 2.0 services to financial services as well.

They discuss the opportunities for blockchain and cryptocurrency to scale given that as big as it has gotten over the past few years, they still account for only a minuscule portion of the value of the entire financial system. A lot of attention is focused on venture capital and how that could be disrupted by blockchain, but they talk about how debt financing is many orders of magnitude larger than VC.

Felix and Nadav explore what the implications of everything being tokenized might be and Erik also asks about what they are excited about in terms of products and protocols in the space as well as what they would love to see built in the future.

Quotable lines from this episode:

“If the cost of issuing an asset goes to zero, what happens when everything is traded? Then things get really interesting when you add derivatives and loans on top of that.”

“Imagine you’re in a virtual reality world and you’ve made a virtual piece of art that’s hanging in a digital museum and you get revenue from people visiting it every so often. Now imagine you tokenize it or draw a loan against it, and pay off your mortgage in the real world.”

“If you look back on this podcast in 20 years, it’s probably not going to age well because everything [that will be tokenized] is going to be even weirder because we have had no idea what these things are going to look like.”

“I think that blockchain is going to create new asset classes that will be tremendously more valuable and will look like almost nothing we’ve seen in the traditional world.”

“If there are going to be monoliths that emerge from this in some capacity, they’re going to have to capitalize on some irredeemably scarce resource that can’t be traded or commoditized, and I think it’s likely that resource will be trust.”

“The high end estimate for the value of all derivative contracts is 1.2 quadrillion. I didn’t even know that was the number after a trillion.”

-

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Alan Curtis of Radar Relay, a Village portfolio company, joins Erik to talk about what Radar Relay is working on and to discuss what is needed to get bring the world into the token economy. Alan explains the four main categories of tokens: utility, security, collectible and currency. He then compares and contrasts centralized and decentralized exchanges for those tokens.

Alan gets into what a relay is, why it matters, and what the future of Radar Relay will be. He explains market makers in crypto, why he decided to build on top of 0x and discusses the pros and cons of a business built on another company’s platform.

They also discuss what the bottlenecks to widespread adoption of crypto are, what kinds of moats he hopes to build as well as what kinds of moats the incumbents in the traditional finance have.

Quotable lines from this episode:

“The ethos around blockchain is about self-agency — it’s about efficacy.”

“Talent is evenly distributed but opportunity is not.”

“For any cool project online there will always be those 1000 true fans, but if you’re not thinking deeply about how this crosses the chasm and how you get your next users, your project is probably going nowhere fast.”

“I think most people underestimate the power of brand in the long term and overestimate it in the short term.”

“A decentralized exchange is an imprecise term that people have been using as a noun when in fact it is a verb.”

“We’re moving a world where the centralized exchanges become fiat brokerages.”

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Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Amitt Mahajan (@amittm), co-founder and CTO of Rare Bits and investor at Presence Capital, joins Erik and his guest co-host Tony Sheng of Decentraland for this episode.

They dive into all things non-fungible tokens, explaining how they work, why they matter, and why they have so much potential. They explain why you you really only have tenuous ownership of the virtual goods that you purchase online and how the company that sold it to you can unilaterally take it back. Amitt and Tony get you to imagine the potential use cases if you could take virtual goods purchased in one game and take them to another game, re-sell them, or tokenize them.

The three carry on to discuss the issues around the discussion of crypto more generally and how to get a broader audience to use crypto by ending the fixation on the technology itself and instead focusing on the value to the end-user. They talk about how to solve the supply and distribution problems when it comes to digital goods and discuss how marketing of crypto projects might evolve in the future.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

In this episode, Erik talks to Ryan King (@frothcity), co-founder of FOAM protocol, and Jehan Tremback (@jtremback), founder of Althea Mesh.

They explain how the blockchain makes it possible to know for certain where exactly somebody is at a given time and how that enables new technologies. For example, in the area of smart contracts, if someone bought a train ticket and the train is late, they can prove where they are to request a refund. Ryan has been working at FOAM protocol to make things like this a reality.

Jehan’s work at Althea Mesh allows individuals to create their own decentralized access to the internet, which is also newly enabled by the blockchain. He explains how he hopes to create a platform in the spirit of Airbnb to enable people to become suppliers of internet to others.

Ryan and Jehan discuss how their companies are complimentary to each other and how their respective technologies might work together in the future. They also cover the positive impacts of decentralization, the effects of incumbents, and what they would like to see happen in the space in the future.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

With Erik for this episode are:

- Aaron Batalion (@abatalion), formerly partner at Lightspeed and founder of LivingSocial
- Vinny Lingham (@VinnyLingham), CEO of Civic and GP at Multicoin Capital and Newtown Partners
- David King (@dksf), angel investor and crypto curator

They have a wide-ranging and lively discussion about a number of topics around the state of crypto in 2018 and make some bold predictions for the future. The three cover the geopolitics of cryptocurrency, talk about how digital currency interacts with governments around the world, and the impact of large platforms like Facebook on cryptocurrency.

They debate the merits of various cryptocurrencies and predict which might be able to achieve scale first. They also talk about privacycoins, stablecoins, and the hurdles that each of those forms face. The trio also cover the recent wave of ICOs and speculate on how many of those companies will still be viable years from now.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Josh Stein, CEO of Harbor, Stephen McKeon (@sbmckeon), finance professor at the University of Oregon, and Parker Thompson (@pt), seed-stage investor, partner at AngelList and token skeptic.

The guests give an overview of all things tokenized securities. Josh tells us why he’s so enthusiastic about the rise of the blockchain and recounts the origin story of Harbor. They talk about why it can be so complex to manage compliance with securities rules and regulations that vary around the world and how the blockchain can solve a big part of that problem.

They discuss why liquidity is so important when it comes to any type of security and how the blockchain can turn illiquid assets into liquid ones. For example, in the future, you might be able to own part of a sports team or part of a famous Monet if the owner decides to tokenize those assets.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at www.villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik and guest co-host Tony Sheng (@tonysheng) of Decentraland interview managing partners of Multicoin Capital Tushar Jain (@TusharJain_) and Kyle Samani (@KyleSamani). They explain why many people are underestimating the potential impact of blockchain on the web and on the world in general. In their words, “tokenizing shares of Apple stock and putting it on the blockchain will be akin to PDF’ing a newspaper and putting it online in 1995 — and thinking this is how the internet will change news as an industry.”

They discuss a number of other topics within the crypto universe and cover some of the more interesting recent developments in the crypto world. Tushar and Kyle also break down their recent blog post about the Web3 Stack and discuss the obstacles that crypto and the blockchain are facing and how they can be overcome.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Venture Stories is brought to you by Village Global and is hosted by co-founder and partner, Erik Torenberg. Shawn Xu is our researcher, Colin Campbell is our audio engineer, and the show is produced by Brett Bolkowy.

Erik is joined by Tim Swift and Ariel Poler on this episode of the podcast. Tim Swift is founder and CEO of Roam Robotics and Ariel Poler (@ariel) is an angel investor.

They discuss how the human body could be engineered for the better and discuss a number of ways to do that, including exoskeletons, brain-computer interfaces and nootropics. They fill us in on who the founders and companies are who are currently working on those difficult problems. Erik asks what those companies promise to do and what obstacles they are facing.

Ethics is an important topic when it comes to bioengineering and the trio discuss some of the more important ethical considerations around these issues and how society’s view of what is ethical or not has evolved over time as new inventions have come about.

They also discuss some of the unique challenges when it comes to building a business in an area where it might take ten years for one’s work to come to fruition. They talk about the type of investor who is interested in the space, plans to invest for the long-term and is willing to be patient to see a return.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

This special live episode was recorded at the Atrium offices in San Francisco on June 20 2018. Village Global co-founder Erik Torenberg hosted a fireside chat with Daniel Kan, co-founder and COO of Cruise Automation and Qasar Younis, former COO of YCombinator.

They discussed all things fundraising, providing an inside look into the world of VC funding and exposing some of the subtler points of fundraising for seed and Series A rounds. They discuss topics like dealing with VCs, refining your pitch and the importance of metrics in a Series A round. They also talked about prepping for meetings with VCs, what motivates VCs, how to efficiently backchannel via your network and transitioning from a seed round to a Series A round.

They finished with an enlightening Q&A session, taking questions from the live audience at Atrium.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Simon de la Rouviere (@simondlr), crypto developer and thought leader, and Trent McConaghy (@trentmc0), founder of Ocean Protocol, join Erik for an enlightening discussion of crypto.

They explain the vast societal transformation that will be brought by blockchain, sometimes in ways that are hard to imagine today. They tell us why we are just at the beginning of a new revolution and how it compares to the rise of the web in the 90s.

They promise that “things are going to get weird.” For example, the future your kids inhabit might be one where they earn money as “meme traders” and where cars are not only self-driving but self-owning as well.

They also explain why in the future “if it’s not on the blockchain, it didn’t happen” and why it might become very difficult for us to discern what reality in fact actually is.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Robin Hanson, associate professor of economics at George Mason University, joins Erik for a primer on prediction markets. He explains how prediction markets work and why they are one of the best methods of forecasting the future that we have.
 Robin explains how useful prediction markets can be in a wide variety of fields, including some unexpected ones.

Robin and Erik speculate on why prediction markets haven’t seen widespread adoption yet and what barriers still stand in their way. They also discuss how to mitigate some of the potential pitfalls of prediction markets and how decision-making based on prediction markets can benefit society in general.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Joining Erik for this interview are Joey Krug (@joeykrug) of Augur and Tony Sheng (@tonysheng) of Decentraland. Erik and Tony interview Joey about the process of building Augur, his new startup that launched on July 9 2018.

Joey explains what he envisions for Augur, why it’s “the future of forecasting” and how the process of building it has unfolded over the past two years.

He talks about the wide array of possible uses for prediction markets and why he thinks markets in general are the biggest opportunity in crypto. Joey also explains some common misconceptions about crypto and why he thinks we are not yet in a bubble.

He explains how open source blockchain technology is like NASA giving out the code to control the space shuttle and allowing anyone to write commands for it, and why security and privacy are so important in cryptocurrency. They also have a round of underrated vs. overhyped.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

This is a special live episode that was recorded at Village HQ in San Francisco on June 14 2018. The event was put on in partnership with Xoogler, a network of former Googlers who have come together to help each other with their startup ambitions.

Village Global co-founder Erik Torenberg (@eriktorenberg) chatted with Jo Varshney (@jo_getter), founder and CEO of VeriSIM Life and Kiran Bellubbi (@smalldozes), founder of Keyo, about their experience with the Village Network Catalyst program.

Jo and Kiran explain what it was like to be a founder in the Network Catalyst program, including how the team at Village helped them with their business model, leveraged Village's unique structure as a network to their advantage and guided them through the fundraising process.

Joining Erik on this episode are Maia Bittner (@maiab), co-founder of Pinch, and Sheel Mohnot (@pitdesi), FinTech partner at 500 Startups.

They go over the variety of sectors being disrupted by FinTech companies these days, including insurance, credit reporting, personal financial management, capital markets, financial planning, international finance and even banking in the developing world.

Erik asks what kinds of opportunities Sheel and Maia see for founders and entrepreneurs as well as the pitfalls faced by different types of companies in the space. Sheel explains how he subdivides his fund and explains the difference between an “enabler” and a “disruptor.”

They talk about why FinTech startups often have an advantage in distribution as opposed to product, contrasting with the competitive advantage a startup typically has. Of course, they also cover crypto and the opportunities in FinTech that blockchain and tokenization provide — as well as where the crypto hype might be overblown.

Erik is joined by Nicole Quinn (@Nik_Quinn), Investing Partner at Lightspeed and Lee Edwards (@terronk), former CTO of Teespring and active angel investor.

They explain why they’re bullish on consumer packaged goods startups and which industries they see startups disrupting in the future. They also discuss why they think there will be so much growth in the space, especially in e-commerce.

They debate the relative importance of having a technically sophisticated founder in a CPG startup and whether a new CPG startup needs to have a strong brand from Day 1. They also talk about the new forms of marketing that CPG startups are taking advantage of.

Erik asks what kind of advice they would give to new CPG founders and what kinds of pitfalls new founders need to avoid.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favourite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Erik is joined by Eric Klein, partner at Lemnos VC, and Sankarshan Murthy (@sancartion), CEO and co-founder of Bumblebee Homes.

They talk about trends in urbanization, housing and storage in America and why changing attitudes towards consumption present a huge opportunity for investors and founders alike.

Sankarshan explains how what his team is working on at Bumblebee Homes will change how and where people choose to live. Eric talks about why he invested in Bumblebee, the other companies he’s invested in so far, and other investment opportunities he's looking for.

They explain why now is a good time to start a hardware startup and how changes in the market have enabled anyone to build a prototype in their garage with off-the-shelf components and free software publicly available on GitHub.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Tammy Sun (@tammysun), CEO and co-founder of Carrot Fertility and Afton Vechery (@aaffttoonn), CEO and co-founder of Modern Fertility talk with Erik about this rapidly emerging space.

They explain how they got started in the fertility space, give us a rundown of the corporate landscape as it stands at the moment and explain why the market is changing so quickly. They also give us some insight into why it's difficult to build a business in this space and what kinds of opportunities they would be looking for if they were investors or prospective founders.

Erik also asks what the future might hold for their companies, how they aim to change how women think about their health, and what kinds of implications a new perspective on fertility might have for society in general.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Kendrick Nguyen (@kendrickesq), CEO of Republic and Andy Bromberg (@andy_bromberg), CEO and co-founder of CoinList join Erik to talk about the changing landscape of investing in crypto.

They explain how their companies will allow more people to invest in cryptocurrencies, will change how startups are funded, and will impact the broader securities markets.

They discuss some of the challenges of securities regulation and how conventional investing will change with the rise of cryptocurrencies.

They also make some bold predictions about how the form of cryptocurrencies will change in the future and how individuals, companies, and governments might be involved.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favourite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Erik talks to Carolyn Witte (@carolynwitte), co-founder and CEO of asktia.com and Hans Gangeskar (@hansois), co-founder and CEO of Nurx.

Carolyn and Hans explain how their companies are creating a new way for women to find healthcare. They recount how a new way of getting care has changed how women feel about their health.

The two founders explain why their business models are different from one another, even though they are in similar verticals. They also talk about what their future roadmap might look like and where the opportunities are for founders and investors alike in this space.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favourite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Erik talks to Polly Rodriguez (@polly_claire), co-founder of Unbound, Andrea Barrica (@abarrica), founder of O.school, and Gina Gutierrez (@Gina__Gutierrez), founder of Dipsea Stories, about the state of sexual wellness startups.

Just a heads-up — due to the topic of the discussion, there is some adult language in this episode.

These founders are on a mission to serve the half of the population that is currently not well served when it comes to sexual wellness. They explain the quirks of the unique market they’ve chosen to tackle, including little availability of data about the market and the hesitance of investors or partners to work with any company even marginally involved in sexuality.

They discuss how the youth of today are growing up in a very different environment when it comes to sexuality and why more and more have to turn to the private sector for sex-ed when the school system fails them.

The three explain how they reach their customers despite the limitations placed on them by traditional marketing channels, swap fundraising horror stories and explain how they plan to create disruption.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favourite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Host Erik Torenberg talks to Jo Varshney, founder of VeriSIM Life, a Village portfolio company, and Eric Stefanich, director and senior scientist at Genentech.

They explain how VeriSIM is changing drug discovery and development and why more and more drugs are being developed "in silico." They also discuss how startups can work in harmony with big companies and how big pharma has become much more forward-thinking than it is usually given credit for. Erik asks what opportunities they would be looking at if they were a VC in the space right now and how software-as-a-service (SaaS) in pharmaceuticals has evolved. They also discuss dealing with different types of investors when you're starting a biotech company.

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Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Erik talks to Adam Bry (@adampbry), co-founder and CEO of Skydio, a company that designs and manufactures autonomous drones. Adam gives us a rundown on where the company is at right now, how it got there and what we should be expecting in the drone space in the future. Erik asks where Adam would be investing if he was running a venture firm focused on the space and what potential roadblocks to the rise of the drones could be. Adam explains what some of the other companies in the space are working on and how an ordinary consumer’s life might change once autonomous drones become more prevalent.

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favourite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Erik is joined by Will Houghteling (@willhoughteling), founder of Strive, a competency-based marketplace, and Kara Nortman (@karanortman), the first investor in Strive and partner at Upfront Ventures. Will explains why he started Strive and how the educational needs of the middle 50% of American post-secondary students aren’t being met at the moment. Kara and Will discuss the merits of new forms of career-oriented education that have emerged in the past decade, like bootcamps, income-sharing agreements and employer-paid training. They also take a look at what other companies in the space are doing. Finally, they talk about why Will says "the future of work is emotional labor" and discuss the changes to meaning and identity coming with the advent of AI and universal basic income. And of course, "it's not a tech podcast without blockchain!"

Thanks for listening — if you like what you hear, please review us on your favourite podcast platform.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or get in touch with us on Twitter @villageglobal.

Erik talks to Shilpi Kumar (@_shilpikumar), who helps Village Global find hardware investments and Seth Winterroth (@sethwinterroth), partner at Eclipse Venture Capital. They explain how hardware has been changing over the past several years and where they think it's going. They also explain why hardware devices like Amazon Echo and Google Home are being sold at a loss and what might be enabled when machines are able to speak to each other more efficiently. They also talk about some of the coolest companies they've seen recently and how automation will change different industries.

We apologize for the quality of audio in this interview.

If you like what you hear, please review us on your favourite podcast platform. Thanks!

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or on Twitter @villageglobal.

Rebecca Kaden (@rebeccak46) recently joined Union Square Ventures in in her hometown of New York City as a partner. She and Erik (@eriktorenberg) talk about why she joined USV and the three “waves” of investment theses for the firm. They discuss the unique dynamics in a partnership versus a company. She talks about her recent investment in Nurx, a company that specializes in delivery of birth control to women who might otherwise not be able to access it. Rebecca also talks about why network effects apply to more than just social networks and what opportunities are opening up in the consumer healthcare space. They also discuss potential opportunities in fintech and insurance and why now, in the age of Amazon, it’s still a great time to create a consumer brand.

If you like what you hear, please review us on your favourite podcast platform. Thanks!

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or on Twitter @villageglobal.

Erik talks to Keith Rabois (@rabois), Managing Director at Khosla Ventures and Jack Altman (@jaltma), CEO and co-founder of Lattice. Keith and Jack draw on their experience working at high-growth start-ups to explain how to attract the best people to your startup. They discuss how and when to hire and fire when you’re running an early stage company, the parallels between sports and work, and how to pick a co-founder. Jack says that he can tell a lot about a startup just by walking around the office and Keith tells us why a change in floor plan was the beginning of the end for his former company, Slide. Keith and Jack also discuss why “the best way to retain people is to win as a company.”

If you like what you hear, please review us on your favourite podcast platform. Thanks!

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or on Twitter @villageglobal.

Kyle (@kylenakatsuji) talks to Erik about his company, Clearcover, which plans to offer a new way to buy insurance. Kyle has extensive experience in the insurance industry as an employee, investor and founder, and describes the ins and outs of the insurance industry to us. He explains why insurance companies spend such a big percentage of their revenue on advertising and the antiquated way that most insurance is sold these days. That leads to a discussion of how insurance companies and the industry in general might be disrupted. He tells us what a new kind of insurance company might look like and which companies he’s long or short on.

If you like what you hear, please review us on your favorite podcast platform. Thanks!

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast or on Twitter @villageglobal.

Selina Tobaccowala (@selinato) of Gixo and Holly Shelton (@hlshelton) of MoveWith join Erik for a discussion of the state of consumer fitness apps. The Gixo and MoveWith apps bring fitness to you. Selina and Holly break down the successes of a few other companies in the space and talk about what the business models look like for both online and offline fitness. Erik asks why it’s been so difficult to build a business in this space and they discuss the difficulty of behavior change and how to make fitness something you want to come back to again and again. Selina and Holly also talk about how VR/AR might affect fitness and why competition feels so good — even for non-competitive people.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast.

Erik talks to Sara Mauskopf (@sm) and Anne Halsall (@annekate) about Winnie, the “companion app for parents” which Erik calls the “most slept-on consumer social company today.” Sara and Anne tell us about Winnie’s unique combination of a community and a utility. They talk about how they bootstrapped the company to where it is today and their unique approach to company culture. They also discuss how they approach social media and play Long-Short, where Erik names a company and Sara and Anne say whether they’re long or short and why. They end with the advice Sara and Anne have for new founders.

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Erik talks to Tom McLeod (@tmcleod3) and Ryan Delk (@delk) of Omni about the future of access. Omni provides physical storage but is also a marketplace, allowing you to rent what you need on-demand or make extra money renting out the things you’re not using. Tom and Ryan recount their entrepreneurial journey so far and what their plans are for the company in the future. They talk about the changing patterns of consumption by millennials and how those may change consumer goods in the future. Tom explains his theory of the three types of entrepreneurs and why he says in the world of work and entrepreneurship, “everything is like selling t-shirts.”

Disclosure: Erik is an investor in Omni.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast.

Erik and his co-host for this episode, Abie Katz of August Capital, interview Josh Elman (@joshelman), partner at Greylock Partners. Josh recounts the twists and turns of his career and how they led to him becoming a venture capitalist. He talks about the unique approach he takes when working with founders and how that has impacted the outcome of his investments. He tells us why you so infrequently find truly visionary founders and how Greylock thinks about their seed stage Discovery Fund. Josh also explains the candid candid career advice he would give to his younger self.

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Erik interviews Ash Fontana (@ashfontana) of Zetta Venture Partners with his co-host for this episode, Abie Katz of August Capital. They talk about how Ash got his fund started and how and why he structured it the way he did. They discuss how to manage growth in a venture fund and the relative importance of being a recognizable brand in the space. They ask Ash what he looks for in a machine learning startup and Ash explains why sometimes it’s better to stay small. He also talks about how and why to be intellectually honest about your investing decisions.

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Erik and his co-host for this episode, Abie Katz of August Capital, interview Amitt Mahajan (@amittm) of Presence Capital. He talks about the future of both VR and AR, what kinds of companies he’s been investing in and the many novel applications of VR in the enterprise setting. He tells us whether he thinks AR or VR will have a bigger impact on the world and tells us about some of the more interesting advances in the technology as well as what might be coming in the future. He also discusses the possible social implications of VR and AR.

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Erik (@eriktorenberg) sits down with Donnie Dinch (@donnie), Michael Galpert (@msg) and Greg Isenberg (@gregisenberg) to discuss the state of consumer social today. They talk about why people call them crazy to try to build something in this sector today and why it’s like “walking up a downward escalator.” They dissect the uneasy relationship between the big players and the smaller companies in the space and why you need to “build with one eye over your shoulder.” They also discuss the emerging trends in consumer social, particularly as they relate to young people.

Check us out on the web at villageglobal.vc/podcast.

This episode is all about the state of biotech, with Dylan Morris of Charles River Ventures and Cain McClary of KdT Ventures. They discuss the difference in incentives when investing in biotech compared to more traditional venture capital investments and why the timelines for investments in biotech are so different compared to when most venture capitalists expect a return. They explain their respective investing theses and talk about what kinds of opportunities there are for startups in the space. Plus, they speculate on what the future might hold based on what’s happening in biotech today.

Erik talks with Malay Gandhi and Christine Lemke about the state of innovation in healthcare today, why it’s so difficult to build a company in the space, the blind spots that entrepreneurs and investors from outside the sector have, how to truly change behavior and what opportunities in healthcare Malay and Christine see.

Malay Gandhi is an active angel investor in early stage, health-focused startups and advises a number of leading health tech companies. He serves as an EIR at Greylock Partners and is partner with Christine at Ensemble Labs.

Christine Lemke is co-founder and President at Evidation Health, a company that helps individuals and healthcare companies understand and influence the behaviors that create better health outcomes using data. She is also partner with Malay at Ensemble Labs.