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The Stack Overflow Podcast on Smash Notes

The Stack Overflow Podcast podcast.

January 09, 2020

The Stack Overflow podcast is a weekly conversation about working in software development, learning to code, and the art and culture of computer programming. Hosted by Sara Chipps, Paul Ford, and Ben Popper, the series will feature questions from our community, interviews with fascinating guests, and hot takes on what’s happening in tech.
About Stack Overflow
Founded in 2008, Stack Overflow is the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers. More than 50 million professional and aspiring programmers visit Stack Overflow each month to help solve coding problems, develop new skills, and find job opportunities.



Episodes with Smash Notes

On this sponsored episode of the Stack Overflow Podcast, we talk with Greg Leffler of Splunk about the keys to instrumenting an observable system and how the OpenTelemetry standard makes observability easier, even if you aren’t using Splunk’s product.

The home team shares their programming origin stories, from year one, when everyone was bitten by a radioactive microchip, all the way to the present, where we are talking about code on a podcast.

We chat with Isaac Lyman, a developer who wrote a great piece on code quality. Far from premature optimization, focusing on code quality early has huge benefits for the company's bottom line and its developers' mental health.

It's a reunion episode featuring a Stack Overflow classic crew, with Ben Popper, Paul Ford, co-founder of Postlight, and Sara Chipps, engineering manager for flagship architecture at LinkedIn. We talk about Paul getting his first job in software from a footer note on the CSS mailing list. Later we chat about Sara's experience going from a company with hundreds of engineers, to one with thousands.

In this episode, we chat with Eran Shir, CEO of Nexar, a company that provides smart dashcams. Using machine learning and the power of crowdsourcing, Nexar aims to help everyone drive smarter without sacrificing privacy.

In this episode, we chat with Stephen Goldberg and Kyle Bernhardy from HarperDB. Their startup was born from their experience dealing with the firehose of Twitter data during sporting events, and now they have a database designed to scale well for real-time data.

This week, the home team discusses the environmental impact of blockchain technology, especially as it related to art and NFTs. We also explore the tensions around content moderation, and how users will find ways to turn nearly any opening for interaction into an opportunity for...free expression.

We chat with Paul Powers, founder and CEO of Physna, about what it takes to build a 3D search engine that can identify objects found in the real world. He hopes the process of connecting the digital and physical worlds will provide a tremendous boost to the speed of hardware innovation.

On today's episode we talk about Microsoft's big push towards a world without passwords. We also discuss what it's been like to live and work in a world increasingly dominated by two-factor authentication (2FA), and sometimes three-factor authentication. Last but not least we talk a little bit more about our favorite game, Dwarf Fortress, and the joys of procedurally generated worlds.

In this sponsored episode, we chat with Nick Mathison and Sylvan Carbonell from HCL Software DevOps about value stream management and how their product, HCL Accelerate, brings visibility into the entire gamut of the SDLC, from the request coming in from a customer to deploying code to the production servers.

Our April Fools joke was so popular we decided to make it into a real product. You can now purchase a glorious Stack Overflow meme brought to life. The Key is available through the fine folks at Drop. In this episode we chat with Kunal Kumar of Drop about what it took to make our copy-paste keyboard into consumer friendly macropad.

The home team talks out encrypting DNS, the shiny new Apple gear, the ease and pitfalls of no-code/low-code application development, productivity vs. our guilt and self-loathing, and the after effects of the pandemic on our online presence.